Is this bathroom setup up to snuff?

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I'm planning on tacking a bathroom remodel and would like some pro advice as to whether this is up to snuff or not. I've never done wet venting before, but apparently that is what used to be in the bathroom and I'm planning on slightly modifying. Originally there was a double vanity (on the right) and a tub. I'm converting the tub to a shower and moving one of the vanities to between the tub and toilet. Attached is a diagram.

The shower pipes will be replaced and will be done with 2" with San Tee #3 spliced in horizontally. The one sink will be taken off the original and moved to the new location. I'll splice in san tee #2 horizontally and use 2" PVC to a long sweep 90 to san tee #8. #8 will be 2" down, 1.5" to sink, and 1.5" up. I'll add the 1.5" vent from #8 to #7, with 2 90's along the way. #7 will be spliced in above #5 and #6 which already exist, so that vertical run should be above the drain of all fixtures.

I'm assuming that the toilet is 3" and up to snuff as that was in the original config, along with that random vent that is popping up and tying in to #6 (not exactly sure what it being vented, but it's 2" and our best guess is it's the kitchen sink from down below.

The horizontal from #8 to #7 will slope 1/4/ per ft up and the horizontal to #2 and #3 will slope 1/4 per foot down.

Anything that I'm missing?
 

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Quarter Slope

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So I was wondering about that. I had seen that Sani Tees shouldn't be used in the horizontal installation, but then, low and behold, this is what I see. This is #3 in the diagram above and looking under the floor #2 is the same. I wasn't sure if that was some sort of wet vs dry venting thing or what as presumably this was done to code before....
 

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Jeff H Young

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if t
So I was wondering about that. I had seen that Sani Tees shouldn't be used in the horizontal installation, but then, low and behold, this is what I see. This is #3 in the diagram above and looking under the floor #2 is the same. I wasn't sure if that was some sort of wet vs dry venting thing or what as presumably this was done to code before....
if thats a dry vent for fixtures on floor below and those pipes are horizontal then they are ok the offset though not clean looking wont really hurt a thing .Id leave it alone.
Santees cant be used horizontaly for drainage would be the correct way to look at this
 

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?? As I said, that picture is the picture of Santee #3 - it is laying horizontal in the joist bay with one end going downstream for waste and the other connecting to the vent. #2 is the same way and possibly #1 (burried under the floor so unsure).
 

Jeff H Young

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ok a little confused . Thats all wrong get rid of santees 1, 2, and 3 on side! use wyes or combis
 

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Ugh. I was afraid you were going to say that. I didn't think that was code, but that's what's already there. Looking at the bathroom in another part of the house, they did the same thing. Am I missing something? Did that use to be code? Is that not a santee in the picture?
 

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If I had a home plumbed that way existing and it was exposed acessable I might leave it if it was working ok. but other wise Id replace it
 

wwhitney

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That is a santee -- you can tell because the projection of the side inlet onto the main path is between the two hubs; on a combo it is past the upstream hub. Santees have never been allowed flat for drainage, to my knowledge. Anywhere you see one flat for drainage and have access to it, it should be replaced with a combo.

On your diagram, I take it that is a proposed layout? An existing diagram, along with the locations of the new fixture outlets you need to connect, would be helpful. For the proposed diagram, that wall with 3 san-tees on it connecting vents, what is the vent connect to the middle san-tee? Also, I would think that the bottom san-tee should just be 90, and the pipe between that santee and the shower "combo" should be deleted. Because your diagram implies it's not a drain, and as a dry vent it can't tie into the shower drain flat.

[Of course, you could use it as a drain, e.g. for the sink to the right, if you want to run a horizontal trap arm for that sink in the wall. I think that would likely simplify the work required, although it's hard to tell without an existing diagram.]

Cheers, Wayne
 

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picture has it marked santee 3 I think he is saying its already plumbed this way. santee 1,2,3, and the dry vent for shower a no no
 

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That is a santee -- you can tell because the projection of the side inlet onto the main path is between the two hubs; on a combo it is past the upstream hub. Santees have never been allowed flat for drainage, to my knowledge. Anywhere you see one flat for drainage and have access to it, it should be replaced with a combo.

On your diagram, I take it that is a proposed layout? An existing diagram, along with the locations of the new fixture outlets you need to connect, would be helpful. For the proposed diagram, that wall with 3 san-tees on it connecting vents, what is the vent connect to the middle san-tee? Also, I would think that the bottom san-tee should just be 90, and the pipe between that santee and the shower "combo" should be deleted. Because your diagram implies it's not a drain, and as a dry vent it can't tie into the shower drain flat.

[Of course, you could use it as a drain, e.g. for the sink to the right, if you want to run a horizontal trap arm for that sink in the wall. I think that would likely simplify the work required, although it's hard to tell without an existing diagram.]

Cheers, Wayne

The diagram is of the proposed layout based on modifications to the existing plumbing (see description in original msg). With the existing plumbing, where it is marked shower there used to be a tub, and it is connected to the horizontal drain with a santee (as shown in the posted picture). Where santee #2 is there used to be a shower, and I had planned on just cutting off the p trap and continuing the pipe up the wall to install a santee #8 for the sink plus the dry vent that goes with it.

The sink on the right has it's own drain (I have no idea why, other than it used to be a double vanity, not that it matters), but it ties into the vent stack at santee #5. I'm not exactly sure what is tied into #6, but based on the crazy routing it takes, it could only be venting - I'm guessing for the downstairs kitchen sink. Our guess is they didnt want an ugly vent pipe on the front of the house, so they connected to this one.

I don't really understand why the section from #5 to #3 can't be there as that is how the original toilet/shower/tub were vented. If I were doing this from scratch then I could probably leave that piece out alltogether and just elbow the new shower into the horizontal line and run 2" vent from #8 to #7, but since it's already there it'd be more work to rip it out and it seems like if anything it's providing more venting than just the path from #8 to #7 alone.
 

Jeff H Young

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vent from 3 to 5 flagrant violation [poor workmanship. likely to plug up and cant wash clearin my and many opinions ipc 905.3
 

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905.3 says

905.3 Vent Connection to Drainage System

Every dry vent connecting to a horizontal drain shall connect above the centerline of the horizontal drain pipe​
That is a santee -- you can tell because the projection of the side inlet onto the main path is between the two hubs; on a combo it is past the upstream hub. Santees have never been allowed flat for drainage, to my knowledge. Anywhere you see one flat for drainage and have access to it, it should be replaced with a combo.

On your diagram, I take it that is a proposed layout? An existing diagram, along with the locations of the new fixture outlets you need to connect, would be helpful. For the proposed diagram, that wall with 3 san-tees on it connecting vents, what is the vent connect to the middle san-tee? Also, I would think that the bottom san-tee should just be 90, and the pipe between that santee and the shower "combo" should be deleted. Because your diagram implies it's not a drain, and as a dry vent it can't tie into the shower drain flat.

[Of course, you could use it as a drain, e.g. for the sink to the right, if you want to run a horizontal trap arm for that sink in the wall. I think that would likely simplify the work required, although it's hard to tell without an existing diagram.]

Cheers, Wayne

So here's a question: why would making the sink on the right drain into it all of the sudden make it acceptable? How would never using that sink be any different than not having it connect at all?

 

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So other than swapping the 3 tees for eyes /combos on their side, what else needs to be fixed if I cut off the section from #3 to #5? Would I need to upsize the branch vent (#8 to #7) to 2" to meet standard for toilet? Would tying in to that branch from the shower accomplish anything? I was really hoping to only have to run 1.5 through the studs as running 2" through 2x4 is doable but leaves little room for error,and since those will be tiled shower walls, I don't want to press my luck. They already did a crappy job running the 2" from #4 to #5 - some of the studs almost look like they are notched the pipe is so close to the edge and the didn't even use shoes.
 

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905.3 says

905.3 Vent Connection to Drainage System

Every dry vent connecting to a horizontal drain shall connect above the centerline of the horizontal drain pipe​


So here's a question: why would making the sink on the right drain into it all of the sudden make it acceptable? How would never using that sink be any different than not having it connect at all?

because in my opinion if the vent got plugged up and wasent doing its job your sink wouldnt drain either and presumably you would clear the sink thus repairing the vent in the process. I cant tell you the reason of the code as my code book doesent explain all that this is a guess as to why. this kind of venting wasent legal very long ago in my area .
 

wwhitney

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So other than swapping the 3 tees for eyes /combos on their side, what else needs to be fixed if I cut off the section from #3 to #5?
That's basically it, as long as #5 is 6" above the sink flood rim.

#1 - 3" combo
#2 - 2" combo
#3 - 2" LT 90
#5 - change to 2" 90

If #5 is too low, then move #5 to above #7, and change #6 to 2" 90.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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