Replacement of Cast Iron in Tight Space

Users who are viewing this thread

AndrewME

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Maine
What is the best way to deal with the situation in the photo attached? I'm replacing the 4" cast iron with 4" PVC. The problem is these pipes are near the bottom of the basement stairs so we need headroom as well as space around the stairs when we need to bring items in/out of the basement like a water heater.

Additionally, the drain is directly against an interior foundation wall. It appears that the original cast iron used a sanitary tee in the horizontal direction, which I know I cannot do and keep it up to modern code. I tried to see if a 4"comb wye would fit where the sanitary tee was, but when I lined it up the wall was in the way.

On the picture below, the far left is the stack that serves a upstairs bathrooms, the middle is the first floor toilet.

IMG_20210130_135747099.jpg


IMG_20210130_135812144.jpg
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
9,378
Reaction score
2,367
Points
113
Location
92346
Description is not making sense. Bottom picture not showing much, top pic . so you're saying the santee on back is going up for a w/c ? no vent?
Put a wye against wall and bring 2 separate lines through hole in floor , it will take a few more fittings
 

AndrewME

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Maine
The top picture is the best that I have for now. The second picture was just to show how tight it was with the wall and stairs.

Yes, sanitary tee on it's back is to the water closet. The only vent in the house is up the stack that is the 90 going up on the far left.

I was also thinking I'd be stuck using a wye there, but it would decrease headroom compared to now, but it may the the only good way. Would that reduce the venting compared to the current setup?

I also thought about just replacing the stack above the basement level and just deal with the cast iron in the basement once it starts leaking, but that seems like a time bomb.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
29,942
Reaction score
3,462
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
The vent for the toilet can be on a wye below the toilet and run separately. As it is now, dropping a toilet into a santee on it's back it not a good thing. Better to drop into a 90 and bring the vent up by itself.
If you cut anything, be aware that cast is very heavy and it wants to drop down quickly. Before anything gets cut, it needs to be supported well. Especially the vent going up to the next floor. Are you sure that's just a vent and not the waste for a floor above?


andrewme-01.jpg
 

AndrewME

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Maine
Thanks. Currently, the 4 inch pipe on the left is both the vent all the way to the roof and serves as a drain for the upstairs bathroom.
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
9,378
Reaction score
2,367
Points
113
Location
92346
upstairs drain . I wonder if that work was legal 80 years ago/ Terry sketched What I was thinking but w/c needs a vent perhaps the 2 inch can be vent for w/c. If You got walls open or are doing work makes sence to rework it and do it right /or a little less wr that 2 inch line probebly picks up a lav with vent going to second floor and tie into the stack then out roof
 

Mr tee

In the Trades
Messages
354
Reaction score
145
Points
43
Location
Montana
The rubber coupling where the CI connects to PVC should be a CI X PLASTIC shielded coupling.

mission_bandseal.jpg
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks