Pipe meets joist x 2. Toilet height?

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Bert Andersen

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Bathroom remodel and not only is the center drain on Schlueter 48 x 48 right on top of double floor joists, the mortar bed had to be removed and now my toilet waste flange (which rotted away) is extraordinarily high and right against the joist with an offset flange. The flange needs to be replaced but the floor also needs to be leveled and I’m not sure what finished height will be. I’m seeking a shower pan with offset drain but seems to be nothing off the shelf and I’m basically stuck at every corner for the moment. Is there a toilet flange option for me to set height after cement board and leveling? Was trying to avoid raising floor up to where mortar bed was, almost 2 inches, but maybe that’s my best option using a repair flange.. New to the forum but thankful to have been here several times via searches.
 

Reach4

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The picture your words paint is not as clear as you hoped. Shower pan? Closet flange?
 

wwhitney

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Shower pan: since you mention Schluter, I take it you are looking for a tiled receptor. Note that if you use a Schluter shower tray, it is critical that the subfloor underneath it be dead level. Assuming you don't want to adjust the size of the shower, you could

(a) use a 48" x 60" shower tray and cut unequal amounts off each end to get a 48" x 48" tray with the drain where you want it. That will let you adjust up to 6" along one axis. If you already have the 48" x 48", you could cut off a couple inches on one side and put the offcut on the opposite side but it won't line up perfectly, so you'd need to use an appropriate filler underneath the waterproofing to restore the sloped surface. Neither of these methods will give you a level perimeter, so the height of the first row of wall tile will vary a little, but I think the effect would be small and so you may find that acceptable.

(b) use a site-made sloped mortar bed, then you can put the drain wherever you want (central is better) and get the perimeter level.

Toilet flange: can you move the toilet an inch or two? Otherwise, if all the subfloor in the bathroom is up, I suggest bringing the tops of the joists into a single plane (and then if using a Schluter tray, further adjusting them within the footprint of the shower to be level, if necessary). That can be done with (limited) shaving, shimming, or sistering straight 2x4s to the side of a joist to define a new top elevation. Then you can design the full vertical buildup underneath the toilet and set a new offset flange at the correct elevation.

Cheers,
Wayne
 

Bert Andersen

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View attachment 64117

The picture your words paint is not as clear as you hoped. Shower pan? Closet flange?

bert-01.jpg
 

Reach4

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What is that black thing in the toilet piping? Soft rubber? ABS?
 

Bert Andersen

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Shower pan: since you mention Schluter, I take it you are looking for a tiled receptor. Note that if you use a Schluter shower tray, it is critical that the subfloor underneath it be dead level. Assuming you don't want to adjust the size of the shower, you could

(a) use a 48" x 60" shower tray and cut unequal amounts off each end to get a 48" x 48" tray with the drain where you want it. That will let you adjust up to 6" along one axis. If you already have the 48" x 48", you could cut off a couple inches on one side and put the offcut on the opposite side but it won't line up perfectly, so you'd need to use an appropriate filler underneath the waterproofing to restore the sloped surface. Neither of these methods will give you a level perimeter, so the height of the first row of wall tile will vary a little, but I think the effect would be small and so you may find that acceptable.

(b) use a site-made sloped mortar bed, then you can put the drain wherever you want (central is better) and get the perimeter level.

Toilet flange: can you move the toilet an inch or two? Otherwise, if all the subfloor in the bathroom is up, I suggest bringing the tops of the joists into a single plane (and then if using a Schluter tray, further adjusting them within the footprint of the shower to be level, if necessary). That can be done with (limited) shaving, shimming, or sistering straight 2x4s to the side of a joist to define a new top elevation. Then you can design the full vertical buildup underneath the toilet and set a new offset flange at the correct elevation.

Cheers,
Wayne
The toilet is already a half inch further from the wall then standard. I suppose I could move it more but should check elongated toilet measurements. My bigger concern is I don’t know what the finished floor height will be because the curb less shower pan and rest of the bathroom all need leveling as they are out at least a quarter inch in 4 feet in various places. Appreciate the responses thus far. Water is presently off so I’ll dig into this a little later thank you!
 

Reach4

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Sorry, my words are jumping between two problems but I also uploaded pictures which didn’t seem to appear and now it looks like they are doubled on my end.
Not doubled at our end.
The toilet is already a half inch further from the wall then standard. I suppose I could move it more but should check elongated toilet measurements.
Would you consider a 14 inch rough-in toilet? Avoid the ones that just put a larger tank to fill the gap. The Toto toilets that use the Unifit adapter are not cheap, but they will be more compact in service.

With a vertical pipe set for a 14 inch offset, you could put in your flooring, and then cut and install the closet flange.

There are many options for the closet flange in that case.

You can even use a 4x3 closet bend/elbow.
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white-nibco-pvc-fittings-c4807clhd43-64_145.jpg


A 4 inch pipe comes straight up, and then there are lots of good choices. Those include compression flanges that don't glue on. You can have a do-over if you need it.
 

Terry

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If you have PVC, then stick with PVC. You can't mix ABS and PVC.
I'm not a fan of offset flanges. The center of the toilet is normally 15" from center to the next object with a 30" minimum space for it.
Does it have to be that close to the floor joist?

If you were coming straight up to it, you can have the pipe come up long, and then cut level with the floor, and use an inside pipe closet flange, then secure that to the floor.
 

Jadnashua

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FWIW, an elongated toilet's flange location is exactly in the same place as a round one. In fact, your knees will be in the same location as well, but you'll have a little more room in front for those hanging things!

Keep in mind that the rough-in is determined from the location of the FINISHED wall, so if you have the wallboard off, you don't really have an extra 1/2".
 

Bert Andersen

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If you have PVC, then stick with PVC. You can't mix ABS and PVC.
I'm not a fan of offset flanges. The center of the toilet is normally 15" from center to the next object with a 30" minimum space for it.
Does it have to be that close to the floor joist?

If you were coming straight up to it, you can have the pipe come up long, and then cut level with the floor, and use an inside pipe closet flange, then secure that to the floor.
Thanks for your response! What will become the shower drain is currently inch and a half from a previous Jacuzzi whirlpool tub. They reduced it from 2 inch. Is there a somewhat painless option for grinding out the reducer to get back to 2 inch or can I leave it inch and a half?
 

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