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Non-flex copper supply riser

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Reach4

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Reach4 submitted a new resource:

Rigid copper supply riser - How to install a rigid chrome-plated copper riser to a toilet or faucet

The flex plumbing lines are the most common way and easier way to connect from a stop valve to a toilet or faucet. However the chrome-plated rigid "copper riser" lines are not as hard as I used to think... but I admit to having not yet attemped one. I am looking forward to trying if I ever replace at toilet fill valve in the future. If somebody notes some error for me to correct or suggest a good improvement, I will edit this. This is also my first "resource" posting. I am not a plumber.
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Sylvan

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Personally I like using a 3/8 CP brass nipple and setting the tank down on it . This is not for the non skilled
 

Reach4

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Personally I like using a 3/8 CP brass nipple and setting the tank down on it . This is not for the non skilled
Is my concept wrong, or is it that your way is better because more of the tubing extends into the valve?
 

Terry

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Using 3/8 plated soft copper is how most of us did it. You can measure a little long to make sure the tubing fits all the way into the stop.
That being said, the first tightening is where it meets the fixture, either the fill valve on a toilet or the 1/2" threads for a faucet.
The last thing you do, as you mention, is to tighten the nut with sleeve at the stop.

For the toilet, it's important that the 7/8" end meets the fill valve at a flush angle. That must mate up perfectly.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Would be interesting to see a "how to" follow up to this on how to properly, skillfully and aesthetically bend and install tubular supply lines. Prior to '97 that is how I did all my supplies with a tubing bender. Now we only do them on pedestal sinks and certain toilets if requested.
 

Myhouse

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Here's how the chromed brass/copper line looks at my house. The toilet it connects to is a 3 GPF unit, so it's at least 30 years old.

The tank-side of the line is T-shaped. Slides out of the way very easily. In this picture, I pulled the yellow rubber gasket up a bit:

20210503_183243.jpg

The valve-end of the line is your normal compression fitting:

20210503_183254.jpg
 

Sylvan

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Is my concept wrong, or is it that your way is better because more of the tubing extends into the valve?


Your way is not wrong

The reason I like using a 3/8 FIPS X FIPS angle stop and CP 3/8 brass nipple is it helps secure the tank better, allows for a much faster and quieter fill, and less chance of a leak
 

Jadnashua

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A solid supply tube isn't as likely to crack as a flexible one, but takes a bit more skill to install. You may need to cut it to length, and make bends in it to make it fit properly. None is all that hard, but it takes more skill and tools and time, so when time is money, a hose gets used.
 

Sylvan

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A solid supply tube isn't as likely to crack as a flexible one, but takes a bit more skill to install. You may need to cut it to length, and make bends in it to make it fit properly. None is all that hard, but it takes more skill and tools and time, so when time is money, a hose gets used.

A solid tube can kink more readily than a flexible one and is harder to make tight bends
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I stopped using solid chrome plated risers when the chrome was causing leaks under the ferrule by splintering off. Chrome plated risers are definately harder to set up and harder to have not leak because their tolerances are much tighter. Flex tubes are all soft rubber so they can conform to lots of imperfection.
 

Jadnashua

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A solid tube can kink more readily than a flexible one and is harder to make tight bends
Quality control on lots of things can be spotty since we've outsourced so much of our production to overseas. This can apply to both the hoses and the solid chromed tubing.

Like I said, it takes more skill and tools. There are various tubing benders that can be used if you need to make more than a very gentle bend, including spring benders and special pliers that the average homeowner may not have. Certainly, if you try to bend it beyond just a little without the right tools, you can easily kink or collapse the rigid tubing. But, you're more likely to have a leak from a poorly crimped fitting on the hose or to have the hose give way if it is hit and you can kink one of them, too, if you try to bend it in too tight of a curve. On a hose, it may not be catastrophic and require a replacement, though...kink a solid riser, and it's time for a new one.

For decades, plastics weren't available, and the supply as always done with rigid tubing. Personally, I like the chromed finish on the tubing over the hoses, but use both depending on the circumstances. The hoses are quicker and easier to install, and don't take any special tools...they work. There are millions of them out there. They fail once in awhile.
 
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