Triangle Tube Prestige Boiler Problems, Solutions & Question

Users who are viewing this thread

boulderbri

New Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Granby, CO
Hi - I have a TT Prestige Solo 110 with the TT Phase 3 Indirect Fired Water Heater. I live in Granby, Colorado at around 8600 feet altitude. The night temps get down to around 0*.

I've been trying to figure out why we aren't getting the same heat as before (a little chilly in the morning). By early day, things have caught up. Settings are all factory default except for the CH Target Temp is 170* instead of the 186* and the pressure is 12 PSI, which is recommended in the manual for residential.

In the morning, when several zones are requesting heat, the measured supply temp never goes above 125*. I guess I expected it to be much higher since the CH Target Temp is 170*. Is this right or does it sound like there is a problem

There are no error codes or lockout. The only issue I see is that the domestic water temp sensor from the side arm water heater shows -22 but if I turn the hot water on in the house and the TT heats the water heater, the domestic water temp sensor shows 240 (which the manual shows as a short).

So, in short, things seem to work fine for the most part except in the morning, the house is at 65* when all the zones are set for 69*. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
Brian
 
Messages
64
Reaction score
0
Points
6
Location
Stonewall Colorado
Boulderbri,
What does your "before" mean?

In morning, step mode from standby to info, 1st display is boiler output (supply) temp.
Step to 2nd, which is boiler return temp.
If they are close to the same temp. then your heat emitters are undersized,
adjust your 4 ODR parameters, as Dana suggests, you need installation manual
& set the MCB access code 1st.
if they are wide apart, then your boiler is undersized and can't keep up with your load.
If it can't keep up, about all you can do is maximize your target temp. parameter OR pump with higher head.

Add insulation, storm windows, air seal, etc.

BTW, your indirect works fine? There is parameter for DHW sensor type or some such.
 
Last edited:

boulderbri

New Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Granby, CO
Thanks for the response. I say "before" because I don't recall this problem happening the first year or two after the TT was installed. But, I also started seeing this after adjusting the CH Target Temp to lower over the summer. I put it back up to the default 186* and I haven't seen the problem since.

What would be considered wide for determining undersized or oversized? I just looked and it is a ~20* difference this morning.

I do think I need to look at the DHW sensor. I'll check out the installation manual on the DHW sensor type. Thanks for the help!
 
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
BC
I have just got my hands dirty with this delayed ignition problem with a prestige solo 250. Triangle tube's fan during ignition starts off at around 50% and apparently the "thud" or "boom" you are hearing is normal... So says everyone at triangle tube. My experience is mostly with other boiler brands. With the high efficiency boilers I typically install all you can hear if anything during ignition is a very low blowing noise from the blower. You don't actually hear them igniter with a thud or boom. Going over the unit with my combustion analyzer I found the original contractor had set the unit to run too rich. The O level was only 3.2 and the CO was well over 100 (130) and well out of spec. They also installed a 20' length of 1" gaslight after the reg (done so at the recommendation of Triangle tube head office support techs) to act as a buffer? We were getting a pretty serious pressure drop of over 4" between not running and running at 100%. The drop shouldn't be more then around 1". It was so bad the unit at high fire was dropping below the min of 5" to 4.9" from 9" standing. I replaced the gas regulator to a green cap specifically designed to work with high efficiency appliances and re-piped the unit with only a couple of feet of gas pipe which helped to reduce the drop to 2". Still not what I would like to see but a huge improvement. After all this I replaced the ignitor and control board at the recommendation of Triangle tube's support line. The thought was the board was not providing enough voltage to generate a hot enough spark. This didn't solve the problem of the "thud / boom" either. I adjusted my O level to 4% which is right on the money and my CO level came down to 80 which is great. The "thud" is now much less then it was when I first came to site, but in my humble opinion still unacceptable. I feel the best solution to this delayed ignition problem would be to lower the fan's rate during ignition to 20-30% but it is impossible with Triangle tube boilers software to adjust this setting. So in other words, not a unit I would recommend unless you are installing it in a bunker where noise is not an issue and a must would be to get the extended warranty. That being said, TT boilers are rated by others as a high end boiler so perhaps I am missing something. I would only recommend a Locinvar / Knight boiler as they seem to have a much better product.
 

BadgerBoilerMN

Hydronic Heating Designer
Messages
485
Reaction score
10
Points
18
Location
Minneapolis
Website
www.badgerboilerservice.com
Perhaps an experienced Triangle Tube technician could help? We set most up on pressure and verify with a calibrated analyser in the hands of a trained technician. You describe a delayed ignition and it can be corrected. We have found some condensing boiler more reliable than others at high altitude and propane.

We tell our clients if they have a hard lock-out they should record the error code, if there is one, and send us an email.

I know you can find a competent technician and the cost of a factory setup (most important item after sizing) can't be as much as a quality combustion analyser.

Automated reset is creative, but not very smart. This in effect, bypasses a safety circuit. Bad things can happen and often do.
 

mwnitz

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
New York
Violent Ignition

I posted this on another forum already. I'm just trying to get many people to try to think this through...

"I have a high efficient boiler /domestic hot water heater by Triangle Tube, model: Prestige Excellence 110. It's been an awesome unit, and trouble free for 4 years.

All of a sudden I was hearing a bang on ignition, kind of like a violent ignition. I opened up the unit and removed the ignitor, the most common item that goes. It was indeed dirty, and the gap had widened, probably from the violent ignition.

I installed a new ignitor and it ignited like it was brand new. After 2 weeks, I started to hear the delayed violent ignition again. I removed the ignitor and lo and behold it was dirty again. The gap was fine though. I cleaned the ignitor and reinstalled it. It now works like it's brand new again.

I plan on calling the utility company and having them check for excess moisture in the supply, as well as testing the supply water column pressure. If I can talk the tech into it, I'll have him remove the plug on the gas valve and check my manifold pressure (I don't have working manometer at the moment).

Am I missing something painfully obvious here? The air intake and the cone inside of it looks good, there is no restriction on the exhaust or intake, no lockout codes displayed on the self diagnostic screen. I pulled off the cap of the gas drip leg and it looks clean as a whistle."

Second post a month later...

"More info on my problem. I did find the heat exchanger to be moderately dirty. I found debris that resembles sand inside the combustion chamber. I cleaned it out per the manufacturer's recommendation. I vacuumed the heat exchanger narrow air tubes, and I could see the debris in the shop vac. Then I poured water into the heat exchanger. Some of that sand came out of the condensate drain. I had the feeling that I really nailed it, and the combustion of natural gas must have been inhibited from properly exhausting. I sanded off the electrodes, and lo-and-behold it worked fine.... for 3 weeks.

After 3 weeks I heard the intermittent violent initial combustion. It does not do it on every ignition. I found the tips of the ignitor to have red residue on them. After I sand off the electrodes and reinstall, it runs fine with no violent ignition.

I grabbed my combustion analyzer and performed tests 3 times on high fire, and 3 times on low fire. Here are the results:

High fire:

Efficiency: 89%, 88.5%, 88%
O2: 4.5, 4, 3.9
Temp rise: 50, 70, 75

Low fire:

Efficiency: 88, 88, 88
O2: 4.2, 4.25, 4.25
Temp rise: 70, 70, 70

The supply water temperature is well within manufacturer specs of having a clean heat exchanger.

I had the natural gas supply checked for WC. The house is supplied with over 8 WC, great according to my utility company. I asked them to check for moisture in the gas. The way they check for this is have a gas pipe wide open, and place their hand over the hole in the pipe, then release their hand and listen for gurgling. This souunds like the most un-scientific way to check for moisture, but this is how they say they do it.

I do not have a working manometer at the moment to check manifold gas pressure, but I have one coming.

I checked for spark after I cleaned the electrode, and I see a good consistent blue spark at the electrodes.

My serial number does not fall in that engineering bulletin from TriangleTube for a faulty ignition transformer.

What could possible be methodically coating the ignitor electrodes with red material that inhibits the spark? What else could be causing a voilent initial ignition? Or is red material on the ignitor perfectly normal?"

I know it's alot of information. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I find this "thud" to be unacceptable, and never heard it before unitl recently.

Thanks.

-Mark
 

EmmaUtah

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Utah
Horn like sound

I have the same boiler and it made sounds like yours. We fixed it. The fix was very simple but is was the right way to go.

What happened was that clean air and burned air were mixing in the intake air pipe. We noticed that the end of the Prestige Concentric Vent Kit was missing. We put it back in place and the air quality was good again.

Try taking a look at the vent.

Good luck





(1) I have a Solo 110 that makes a horn-like sound just after firing, goes away after about 15 seconds as boiler moves to "high fire". (2) Also, I smell raw gas coming from the intake elbow that connects to the venturi when in standby. TT told me that there should not be a gas smell anywhere! So they arranged to have a guy put in a new gas valve. That didn't fix it. Sometimes I smell gas in the room. Anybody have trouble like this?
Jack
 

Remremrem

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Alaska
Greetings
I am looking for help troubleshooting an issue with my Triangle Tube Prestige Excellence boiler.
As of yesterday it suddenly quit heating the Domestic Hot Water supply.
It still runs the Central Heating flawlessly.
Currently the TriMax interface status is "DHW Priority" meaning it is attempting to heat the DHW but the temperature of the internal DHW storage never increases beyond 62F.
The Boiler fires on to try and heat the DHW until the supply and return temperatures reach about 185F.

I appreciate any info
Thanks!

-Remy in Alaska
 

Remremrem

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Alaska
In an effort to test if the pump works, I measured the temperature of the pump housing at the inlet and outlet and also the temperature at the valve union.

First I measured it after the DHW had been deactivated for over an hour. The pump housing was about 150F at both ends. The valve was about 135F

Then I reactivated the DHW and watched the pump temperature climb to about 190F on both ends.
The valve remained steady at about 135F

It seems like if the pump wasn't working, it would not have heated both ends of the pump housing so quickly, but I am not sure how else I can test the pump.
Is it possible the valve is not functioning?

tt-temps.jpg
 

Splashoil

Retired!
Messages
20
Reaction score
4
Points
3
Location
Bellingham, WA
Larry,
yes I put in new control board with green dot, would not fire off even once, I returned it to TT, now using original board that fires off most of the time.
I also get a variable delayed ignition noise.

I engineered & installed a solonoid that automatically pushes the reset button when E02 happens, this way I can leave house for extended time when its cold outside.

Implementation:
When an E02 happens, either the DHW or the CH pump remains on. I use this to pick a relay (one for each pump) the relay N/O points isolate the 2 pumps from each other & provide 120vac to an adjustable Fenwal thermal switch (break on temp rise) I mounted this on the boiler supply pipe & set it to 110*
If the thermal switch is cooler than 110* the 120vac is sent to a 10 minute Time Delay Relay (delay on make) (TDR)
If 10 minutes expire & the boiler is not producing hot water, the 120vac is sent on to a 2 second TDR, this relay passes the 120vac on to a 9vdc mini power supply that energizes the solonoid which pushes the reset button for 2 seconds. A set of N/C points in the 2 sec. TDR opens at 2 sec. & opens the 120vac to the 10 min. TDR which resets its 10 min. cycle. So this will retry every 10 min. if required.
WORKS EVERY TIME!

I have received advice from a different brand factory Tech support guy to open up the gap by 1/16" to about 5/16" & add a better ground wire.

I have adjusted the gas throttle screw from rich to lean ends of spec repeatedly, make no difference on E02. Right now its toward the lean end in order to get CO into spec.
High Fire CO2=11.1, O2=4.0, X-air=23.6, CO=86ppm

Venting is correct, I think, about 20' equivalent of 3" PVC. Both vent & intake go through rim board about 1' below floor which is about 3' below boiler.

Badger, I have exchanged emails with Mark Etherton (sp?) Denver based pro. He said he would have to charge about 1/3 of what I payed for the boiler to come down for a day & troubleshoot it, no guarentees to fix it. I live in BFE, very remote mountain area, no local TT pros.

BBP
I just reread your post. Did TT authorize you to install your vent and combustion air below the boiler? My manual said venting had to slope back to the boiler so that condensate could be drained through the trap assembly.
Improper venting could explain some of your issues. I would fix that and insure the condensate is not polluting your soil around your house and attacking concrete and plants.
 

John Crowley

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Mink Hollow Road, Lake Hill NY 12448
Any TT folks know how to overcome constant E81 "Sensor Drift" readings...such as the case when we have a prolonged outage on a really cold night ? We have an Instinct Solo 155, installed a little over a year ago. Power outages are quite common where we are.
 

Fitter30

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,692
Reaction score
420
Points
83
Location
Peace valley missouri
Hi - I have a TT Prestige Solo 110 with the TT Phase 3 Indirect Fired Water Heater. I live in Granby, Colorado at around 8600 feet altitude. The night temps get down to around 0*.

I've been trying to figure out why we aren't getting the same heat as before (a little chilly in the morning). By early day, things have caught up. Settings are all factory default except for the CH Target Temp is 170* instead of the 186* and the pressure is 12 PSI, which is recommended in the manual for residential.

In the morning, when several zones are requesting heat, the measured supply temp never goes above 125*. I guess I expected it to be much higher since the CH Target Temp is 170*. Is this right or does it sound like there is a problem

There are no error codes or lockout. The only issue I see is that the domestic water temp sensor from the side arm water heater shows -22 but if I turn the hot water on in the house and the TT heats the water heater, the domestic water temp sensor shows 240 (which the manual shows as a short).

So, in short, things seem to work fine for the most part except in the morning, the house is at 65* when all the zones are set for 69*. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
Brian
at 8600 ' your down from 97k input to 80510 btus - another 5% for (95% efficiency) 76,484 btus.
Mornings taking showers if not what is the return water temp and supply? What type of heat emitters? When was the boiler service and induced fan clean??
 

Fitter30

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,692
Reaction score
420
Points
83
Location
Peace valley missouri
Firstly, thanks for all your help.

Second, no, I am not sure about the noise going from the gas line and not the venting. I'll certainly look as it is safer to inspect/look at/monkey with (you know what I mean).

Lastly, I'll be paying attention to the house temps now that some time has passed and the thermal inertia the house had shouldn't be masking the curve changes I made. I'll also consider timing the burns to see if it is short cycling.

You are probably familiar with how toe kick heaters work. They seem to turn the fan on when they sense water temperature is at a certain point and just shut off below that. Ours used to run all the time, which annoyed me because it is not as quiet at I expected (it also isn't in a complete enclosure due to an impending kitchen remodel, so I can't blame it that much). Since I made the change, it hardly runs at all. To me that says, yup -- the system water was consistently too hot, and even when there was no call for heat and the water wasn't being circulated, the heat could travel through the still water and keep that toe kick fan going all the time. It seems like evidence of the curve needing to come WAY down. Do you agree?

Lastly, and I might have to call TT on this one. The display on the boiler seems to hang out a lot at code/status 6 with the water temperature also showing, instead of at code/status ZERO ("standby/no call for heat") like it used to. Any idea why? Is that also evidence of the issue I had/change I made? Seems like it could be:

BEFORE curve change: Curve WAY too high, unit short cycles, water temp very high, takes a long time to drop down due to small house/small BTU emitters, toe kick runs all the time too. Boiler is thinking "Man, they don't need me -- I'm going to sleep".

AFTER curve change: Unit hopefully not short cycling (I'll report back), water temp NOT way too high for the small house/BTU emitters, toe kick only runs when it should, and boiler doesn't go to "full standby" because it sees the system water temp as close to its minimum and it will be needed for a slow burn soon.

Scary but perhaps accurate metaphor: An airplane pilot can take a nap when flying at 20,000 feet, but not at 2,000 feet.
Whenever you make a change in programming take baby steps. Write down all the setting what u have now change one at a time note the change run a minimum of 24 hours. Change more that one then u don't know what fixed what.
 

SB123

New Member
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Maryland
Violent Ignition

I posted this on another forum already. I'm just trying to get many people to try to think this through...

"I have a high efficient boiler /domestic hot water heater by Triangle Tube, model: Prestige Excellence 110. It's been an awesome unit, and trouble free for 4 years.

All of a sudden I was hearing a bang on ignition, kind of like a violent ignition. I opened up the unit and removed the ignitor, the most common item that goes. It was indeed dirty, and the gap had widened, probably from the violent ignition.

I installed a new ignitor and it ignited like it was brand new. After 2 weeks, I started to hear the delayed violent ignition again. I removed the ignitor and lo and behold it was dirty again. The gap was fine though. I cleaned the ignitor and reinstalled it. It now works like it's brand new again.

I plan on calling the utility company and having them check for excess moisture in the supply, as well as testing the supply water column pressure. If I can talk the tech into it, I'll have him remove the plug on the gas valve and check my manifold pressure (I don't have working manometer at the moment).

Am I missing something painfully obvious here? The air intake and the cone inside of it looks good, there is no restriction on the exhaust or intake, no lockout codes displayed on the self diagnostic screen. I pulled off the cap of the gas drip leg and it looks clean as a whistle."

Second post a month later...

"More info on my problem. I did find the heat exchanger to be moderately dirty. I found debris that resembles sand inside the combustion chamber. I cleaned it out per the manufacturer's recommendation. I vacuumed the heat exchanger narrow air tubes, and I could see the debris in the shop vac. Then I poured water into the heat exchanger. Some of that sand came out of the condensate drain. I had the feeling that I really nailed it, and the combustion of natural gas must have been inhibited from properly exhausting. I sanded off the electrodes, and lo-and-behold it worked fine.... for 3 weeks.

After 3 weeks I heard the intermittent violent initial combustion. It does not do it on every ignition. I found the tips of the ignitor to have red residue on them. After I sand off the electrodes and reinstall, it runs fine with no violent ignition.

I grabbed my combustion analyzer and performed tests 3 times on high fire, and 3 times on low fire. Here are the results:

High fire:

Efficiency: 89%, 88.5%, 88%
O2: 4.5, 4, 3.9
Temp rise: 50, 70, 75

Low fire:

Efficiency: 88, 88, 88
O2: 4.2, 4.25, 4.25
Temp rise: 70, 70, 70

The supply water temperature is well within manufacturer specs of having a clean heat exchanger.

I had the natural gas supply checked for WC. The house is supplied with over 8 WC, great according to my utility company. I asked them to check for moisture in the gas. The way they check for this is have a gas pipe wide open, and place their hand over the hole in the pipe, then release their hand and listen for gurgling. This souunds like the most un-scientific way to check for moisture, but this is how they say they do it.

I do not have a working manometer at the moment to check manifold gas pressure, but I have one coming.

I checked for spark after I cleaned the electrode, and I see a good consistent blue spark at the electrodes.

My serial number does not fall in that engineering bulletin from TriangleTube for a faulty ignition transformer.

What could possible be methodically coating the ignitor electrodes with red material that inhibits the spark? What else could be causing a voilent initial ignition? Or is red material on the ignitor perfectly normal?"

I know it's alot of information. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I find this "thud" to be unacceptable, and never heard it before unitl recently.

Thanks.

-Mark
I know this post is several years old, but did you ever solve your issue? We have the exact same problem with the violent ignition (so much force it pushes the vent off at times causing carbon monoxide to leak into the room) and the red residue on the ignitor. The ignitor has been replaced twice in a year and now is getting the red build up in only a couple of weeks.
 

Fitter30

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,692
Reaction score
420
Points
83
Location
Peace valley missouri
I know this post is several years old, but did you ever solve your issue? We have the exact same problem with the violent ignition (so much force it pushes the vent off at times causing carbon monoxide to leak into the room) and the red residue on the ignitor. The ignitor has been replaced twice in a year and now is getting the red build up in only a couple of weeks.
Have u pulled and cleaned the burner? Double checked the gas pressure?
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
2,433
Reaction score
629
Points
113
Location
Iowa
I know this post is several years old, but did you ever solve your issue? We have the exact same problem with the violent ignition (so much force it pushes the vent off at times causing carbon monoxide to leak into the room) and the red residue on the ignitor. The ignitor has been replaced twice in a year and now is getting the red build up in only a couple of weeks.
Is this a triangle tube?
 

Fitter30

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,692
Reaction score
420
Points
83
Location
Peace valley missouri
Violent Ignition

I posted this on another forum already. I'm just trying to get many people to try to think this through...

"I have a high efficient boiler /domestic hot water heater by Triangle Tube, model: Prestige Excellence 110. It's been an awesome unit, and trouble free for 4 years.

All of a sudden I was hearing a bang on ignition, kind of like a violent ignition. I opened up the unit and removed the ignitor, the most common item that goes. It was indeed dirty, and the gap had widened, probably from the violent ignition.

I installed a new ignitor and it ignited like it was brand new. After 2 weeks, I started to hear the delayed violent ignition again. I removed the ignitor and lo and behold it was dirty again. The gap was fine though. I cleaned the ignitor and reinstalled it. It now works like it's brand new again.

I plan on calling the utility company and having them check for excess moisture in the supply, as well as testing the supply water column pressure. If I can talk the tech into it, I'll have him remove the plug on the gas valve and check my manifold pressure (I don't have working manometer at the moment).

Am I missing something painfully obvious here? The air intake and the cone inside of it looks good, there is no restriction on the exhaust or intake, no lockout codes displayed on the self diagnostic screen. I pulled off the cap of the gas drip leg and it looks clean as a whistle."

Second post a month later...

"More info on my problem. I did find the heat exchanger to be moderately dirty. I found debris that resembles sand inside the combustion chamber. I cleaned it out per the manufacturer's recommendation. I vacuumed the heat exchanger narrow air tubes, and I could see the debris in the shop vac. Then I poured water into the heat exchanger. Some of that sand came out of the condensate drain. I had the feeling that I really nailed it, and the combustion of natural gas must have been inhibited from properly exhausting. I sanded off the electrodes, and lo-and-behold it worked fine.... for 3 weeks.

After 3 weeks I heard the intermittent violent initial combustion. It does not do it on every ignition. I found the tips of the ignitor to have red residue on them. After I sand off the electrodes and reinstall, it runs fine with no violent ignition.

I grabbed my combustion analyzer and performed tests 3 times on high fire, and 3 times on low fire. Here are the results:

High fire:

Efficiency: 89%, 88.5%, 88%
O2: 4.5, 4, 3.9
Temp rise: 50, 70, 75

Low fire:

Efficiency: 88, 88, 88
O2: 4.2, 4.25, 4.25
Temp rise: 70, 70, 70

The supply water temperature is well within manufacturer specs of having a clean heat exchanger.

I had the natural gas supply checked for WC. The house is supplied with over 8 WC, great according to my utility company. I asked them to check for moisture in the gas. The way they check for this is have a gas pipe wide open, and place their hand over the hole in the pipe, then release their hand and listen for gurgling. This souunds like the most un-scientific way to check for moisture, but this is how they say they do it.

I do not have a working manometer at the moment to check manifold gas pressure, but I have one coming.

I checked for spark after I cleaned the electrode, and I see a good consistent blue spark at the electrodes.

My serial number does not fall in that engineering bulletin from TriangleTube for a faulty ignition transformer.

What could possible be methodically coating the ignitor electrodes with red material that inhibits the spark? What else could be causing a voilent initial ignition? Or is red material on the ignitor perfectly normal?"

I know it's alot of information. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I find this "thud" to be unacceptable, and never heard it before unitl recently.

Thanks.

-Mark
Where is all the reading o2 is only one. CO, flue temp and without gas pressure any reading how can you compare from this reading to another one this year or next
 

SB123

New Member
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Maryland
Have u pulled and cleaned the burner? Double checked the gas pressure?
Yes. Just about the entire system has been cleaned or replaced at this point. Gas pressure has been normal every time it's been checked. Technician suspects it's something in the composition of the gas that is causing the residue? Does anyone have any insight to that? We have been trouble shooting this issue for more than a year and only finally got to the bottom of the cause of the loud "bang" that takes place and the repeated (but intermittent) ignition issues -- something is causing this red residue which causes the ignitor to fail or "bang". (Prior to the violent ignition we would regularly get an error that the boiler had failed to ignite after 5 attempts). The issue seems exactly the same as the post in 2014, but I don't see any solution.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks