SC bathroom fitting 2 back to back 90 degs

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Amanda L Roccia

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We built our home in 2013 here is Fort Mill SC. We've always had issues with an upstairs bathroom. We recently had a plumber come in to figure out what the constant clogging and back filling of the tub was all about. Turns out, the sink, toilet and tub all flowed into 2 back to back 90 deg fittings, a short and long. The original plumber is now telling the builder, nothing was done wrong and that it's within code to do so. All my research is stating otherwise. But I am not able to understand the 2018 0r 2012 South Carolina Plumbing code to have it in black and white that they cannot do this and pass inspections. I am also not sure if this is even an inspection item. Any advise or help would be greatly appreciated. Here are photos to show you the original pipes.
 

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Reach4

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SC uses IPC. I was wondering about that lower bend, that goes from vertical to horizontal. Looks like a medium to me, but I could be wrong. It can be a medium sweep for 3 inch and bigger according to table 706.3. So looks permitted to me, if that is 3 inch. And it has to be 3 inch. I am not a plumber.

https://up.codes/viewer/south_carolina/ipc-2018/chapter/7/sanitary-drainage#7
 
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Amanda L Roccia

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SC uses IPC. I was wondering about that lower bend, that goes from vertical to horizontal. Looks like a medium to me, but I could be wrong. It can be a medium sweep for 3 inch and bigger according to table 706.3. So looks permitted to me, if that is 3 inch. And it has to be 3 inch. I am not a plumber.

https://up.codes/viewer/south_carolina/ipc-2018/chapter/7/sanitary-drainage#7
When you say 3 inch do you mean wide? I have the pipe and it's measures at 3 inch opening for both. But the plumber that came stated you never put back to back 90s as it severely reduces water flow and pressure. Especially using a short 90, everything just hits a brick wall and backs up.
 

Amanda L Roccia

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wwhitney

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The lower bend in the photos looks like a long turn 90 to me: the upper bend is a quarter bend, and the distance between hubs on the upper bend is clearly less than on the lower bend.

I'm not aware of any plumbing code that prohibits the configuration shown. I'm also not experienced enough to know if it is likely to cause performance problems such as you describe.

A more elegant configuration, assuming it wouldn't hit the adjacent I-joist, would have been to roll the lower bend 45 degrees towards the upper pipe, an then use a 45 degree bend to connect the upper pipe and the lower bend. And I expect that would have performed better.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Terry

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That was within code.
Horizontal to vertical can be a medium 90, which is what you have.
Vertical to horizontal is a long turn 90, which is also what you have.

You can plumb as many as three bathrooms into that.
I would think there is something else going on there.
 
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