Water boiler replacement advice

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am0

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Hi, we recently purchased a 20-year-old home with a radiant heat system. The inspector who conducted the inspection for us three months ago didn't find any issues with the system. Unfortunately, that's not the case now. When we decided to test the heating system recently, it became apparent that some rooms are not heating. So, we called a heating company to inspect the system. They presented us with two options:

Option 1: Replace the current system with a Navien Combi Boiler, 199k BTU tankless. Cost: $22,000.
cost include the following:
* New Navien Combi Boiler 199k btu tankless with stainless steel heat exchanger. (Unit will support domestic hot water and heating loop.)
* Removal of old boiler and hot water tank.
* Installation of New Boiler
* Configuration of piping to match new equipment
* Replacement of three pumps
* Set up of controls and communication between thermostats.

Option 2: Replace the broken manifolds for the radiant heat. Cost: $5,000.

This is our first home purchase, and we're somewhat surprised by the cost of these replacements. Is this the typical cost nowadays, or are there more budget-friendly alternatives?

Thank you for reading, and please provide some advice.
 

WorthFlorida

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Is there anything wrong with the current boiler? Rooms not getting heat usually mean it's air bound or a bad circulator. Sure a new boiler maybe more efficient but $22k plus another $5k is tough just getting into a home. As usual get at least three bids.

Is Option 2 to fix the current system?

You'll usually not find price ranges on this forum, just too many variables around the country. I do not know if this is high or low bid. Two problems with old boilers, parts not available or the plenum/heat exchanger has rustEd through thus putting carbon monoxide into the home.
 

Keoni37

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Hi, we recently purchased a 20-year-old home with a radiant heat system. The inspector who conducted the inspection for us three months ago didn't find any issues with the system. Unfortunately, that's not the case now. When we decided to test the heating system recently, it became apparent that some rooms are not heating. So, we called a heating company to inspect the system. They presented us with two options:

Option 1: Replace the current system with a Navien Combi Boiler, 199k BTU tankless. Cost: $22,000.
cost include the following:
* New Navien Combi Boiler 199k btu tankless with stainless steel heat exchanger. (Unit will support domestic hot water and heating loop.)
* Removal of old boiler and hot water tank.
* Installation of New Boiler
* Configuration of piping to match new equipment
* Replacement of three pumps
* Set up of controls and communication between thermostats.

Option 2: Replace the broken manifolds for the radiant heat. Cost: $5,000.

This is our first home purchase, and we're somewhat surprised by the cost of these replacements. Is this the typical cost nowadays, or are there more budget-friendly alternatives?

Thank you for reading, and please provide some advice.
On Oct 28 2023 we purchased an 8 year old home in Whatcom County, WA. The home has a radient heating system with slab foundation. House hot water and radient heat water was provided by an 8 year old large tanked hot water system system. 10 days after move in the hot water tank failed, leaked out onto garage floor. Called the contractor that had a sticker on the old tank and they confirmed that the tank had failed and said that tanks in this area have a liftime of about 9-10 years and this had been confirmed by the home inspector who said that the tank was reaching it end of life due to the hard water in this area. So, we were in our new to us home excited about moving in and getting settled and not wanting to go without hot water and heat for a week or more while obtaining bids which was proving difficult to get someone out right away. The contractor with the sticker on the old tank was the only one to come out the following day which they did, confirmed the dead tank and strongly suggested a new tankless combi boiler system. Presented us with 4 quotes to remove the old tank system and replace with new tankless combi. Bids ranged from $16,000 to a high of $24,000 depending on several configurations, warranties, service levels, etc. Ended up opting for the $22,000 offering of a Navien NCB-240/130H. This is a 3br 2ba 2,000sqft home on one level. Felt the cost was excessive also we are retired seniors 77 and 71and I just couldn't help but feel that we were being taken advantage of because of our situation. Never did get an itemized bid which I am still pestering them for.
 

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WorthFlorida

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It sure is hard to say you were at a disadvantage. As I stated this post two years ago, too many variables around the country.

I see you probably did good. The original contractor was still in business and responded immediately. Contractors of the long term usually go with the most reliable since they do not want return for warranty service calls that does cost them money.

Another way to look at it we are not 27 years olds anymore and it’s the piece of mine that your system should be good for many years. I’m 74 with cancer, the wife is 73. Diagnosed June of last year and she is learning how do a few things when I’m not around anymore like changing the air filters in the air handler. Even learning how to deal with landscapers, etc.

You have a contractor that is reliable for service calls and maintenance. BTY, combined boilers do take maintenance, and parts do fail. Just search this forum you’ll see problems but most are very liable and save on your electric bill.
 

John Gayewski

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It's more effeciant to fix what you have. Unless you're ready to invest (with a very very very long term possible payoff) in a new system it's better to fix current equipment.
 

WorthFlorida

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Take few pics of the system, piping ,boiler and name tag.
It's more effeciant to fix what you have. Unless you're ready to invest (with a very very very long term possible payoff) in a new system it's better to fix current equipment.
This is an old post that new member Keoni37 added to this week. It seems he had a water heater for both heating and domestic hot water. The tank failed and had no hot water.
 
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