Toilet flange still needs repair or replacement

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Lee_Leses

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I've been watching this flange for quite some time, it mostly has not been leaking.

I know 95% the problem is a bad cement joint between the PVC flange and the PVC 90 that it's connected to.

I'm very dubious of any of the easy to use rubber kits / boots that promise to seal the leak.

It now occurs to me that basically what I need is a new flange installed.

What's the best way to do that? I'm thinking the best way most done is to cut the PVC pipe off and assemble a new PVC flange using a coupler to splice the PVC pipe?

Are the Oakey flange's with metal rings more desirable than the flanges that are all PVC?

Lastly, is replacing a flange best done from upstairs cutting in to the floor with tiles, or downstairs cutting in to the ceiling? Is either recognized as a better method, or is every situation different?

Also, my opinion is that the tapered flange w/o the test cap (see pic) is by far a better choice, it lets the wax seal do it's sealing more reliably, I think.
 

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John Gayewski

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You cut or replace a flange from whichever way is easier or more convenient depending highly on circumstances.

I agree replacing the piping and fittings is better than an add on system.
 

Jeff H Young

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Many times I add blocking from underneath to secure flange to floor Varys job to job.
 

Reach4

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1. Stainless steel rings are better than plastic, although a failed plastic ring can be repaired with a repair ring.
2. Want to redo a floor, or a ceiling?
3. While re-doing, there is another fitting that can be useful: the toilet bend / closet bend. Input 4 inch, and output 3 inch. You can have ends that are spigot (same size as a pipe) or hub.
4. I had always assumed that the bowl of the closet flanges with the knock-out, had a tapered bowel under the knock-out. Regardless, since you will not be pressure testing, if you have a no-knockout version readily available, go with that.

I did look at a Youtube. Note that there are different types: spigot which glues into a hub, hub which glues over a pipe or spigot bend, and 3-4 which goes over 3 inch pipe/spigot like a hub, or it goes into 4 inch pipe like a spigot. I bring that up because I expect those choices might affect the shape of a bowl.

Note that the maker of this video is trying to make the ones that require hammering to be as hard as possible, and the one that his company makes to be the easy one. Give me one with a stainless ring.

Additionally, there are outside compression cast iron flanges, where the connection of flange to plastic is compression, and is removable and adjustable. Lotsa lotsa choices.

Also note this is your chance to repostiton the toilet a bit. There are actually some decent offset closet flanges that let you offset by 1.5 or 1 inch to perfect the location of the ring.
 
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