SST60 Resin

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dkriene

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In the process of purchasing a water softener for our single family residence in Lincoln, NE. Attached photo shows the city water report from 2022 (11.4 gpg). Based on our winter water bills from 2022, we used 1000 CF of water every two months (roughly 125 gal/day). Systems with a Fleck 5600SXT controller appears to be what is most readily available in our area, so that's likely what we going to purchase. I admit I haven't checked the calcs myself yet, but based on our water use and hardness, a 1 CF softener system has been recommended.

My primary question is regarding the resin type. Based on my research, I had requested 10% standard size resin. When I expressed my desire to maximize the salt and water efficiency of the system, the sales rep recommended SST60 resin. Cost for the unit with SST60 resin is $350 more than 10%, but I'm told the salt savings for the SST60 is worth it if we plan to stay in the home for the long run (which we do). I was unable to find a good comparison between 10% resin and SST60. Is it truly worth it, or is the SST60 just a marketing upsell with little added value?


water report.png
 

Reach4

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I don't think SST resin would be better for city water. I think SST resin is supposed to be better with iron, and your resin does not have to deal with iron. Chlorine/chloromine in the city water breaks down resin with time. What you want is 10% crosslinked resin.
 

Bannerman

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SST60 is claimed to regenerate with only 80% - 90% of the salt needed to regenerate the same amount of softening capacity in standard cation softening resin. In practice, most SST60 softeners will be programmed identically to softeners equipped with standard resin.

I have not seen data that suggests SST60 will tolerate constant chlorine exposure better than standard (8% cross link) resin, unlike 10% cross linked resin which is the reason for using 10% with chlorinated water.

Softening resin, regardless of standard,10%, or SST60, will usually have an approx. total softening capacity of 32,000 (32K) grains per cubic foot To regenerate all 32K capacity every cycle will typically require 18-20 lbs salt/ft3 which would be extremely inefficient and wasteful.

For a 1 ft3 system, to improve efficiency while providing good quality soft water and good usable capacity, the usual recommendation will be to program the softener's controller to regenerate when no more than 24K grains usable capacity has been depleted, as only 8 lbs salt would be required to regenerate that capacity, thereby substantially increasing salt efficiency to 3,000 grains/lb.

Salt efficiency maybe further increased, but compromises will be required since higher salt efficiency will mean lower quality soft water (higher hardness leakage), and since programmed capacity will be further reduced, the softener will require more frequent regenerations which will increase the quantity of water consumed for regeneration when considered over 1 year. For example, the same 1 ft3 softener when programmed to regenerate with 6 lbs salt, will regenerate 21K grains capacity, which will further increase salt efficiency to 3,500 gr/lb, but will also increase hardness leakage from 6 ppm to 10 ppm.

When programmed to use 4 lbs salt to regenerate 17K capacity, efficiency = 4,200 gr/lb but hardness leakage will rise to 15 ppm. FYI, 1 grain per gallon = 17.1 ppm.

Most municipal suppliers will usually state the average water hardness from all sources, but average hardness should not be utilized for programming a softener. As your city many obtain water from multiple sources, and since your home maybe located closer to a higher than average hardness water source, your softener may need to be programmed for higher hardness than a resident located in another section of the same city. Always best to test the hardness at your location using a Hach 5B Total Hardness test kit. Even with that, suggest programming your softener for 2-3 grains higher hardness than identified, in anticipation of occasions when your home may be supplied water from other sources which may have higher hardness than you usually receive.

While a 1 ft3 softener with 10% resin should meet your current soft water usage requirements, suggest also considering a 1.5 ft3 unit also programmed for 8 lbs/ft3 salt (12 lbs total) to regenerate 36,000 grains capacity.

With 125 gallons/day usage X 14 GPG anticipated hardness setting = 1,750 grains/day softening load.

For a 1 ft3 softener:

24,000 gr usable capacity / 1750 = 13.7 - 1 day reserve = estimated 12 -13 day regeneration frequency.

For a 1.5 ft3 softener:

36,000 gr usable capacity / 1750 = 20.57 - 1 day reserve = estimated 19 -20 day regeneration frequency.

As your water is chlorinated, it will not contain ferrous iron or manganese so regeneration frequency will be less critical as long as it occurs at least 1X per month.
 
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dkriene

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Went ahead and ordered a 1.25 CF system with 5600SXT controller. I think I've got all the settings correct now, but wouldn't mind someone with more knowledge double-checking. Below is how I've currently got it programmed, which I believe should be 6 lbs salt/CF. RC was set based on our standard water use (125 gal/day) based on our water bills over the winter. I'm especially interested if I've got the BW/BD/RR times set correctly for our water conditions.


DF

Display Format

Gal

VT

Valve Type

dF1b

CT

Control Type

Fd

NT

Number of Tanks

1

UT

Current Tank in Service

U1

C

Capacity (grains x1000)

26

H

Hardness (grains)

11

RS

Reserve

Rc

SF

Safety Factor

n/a

RC

Reserve Capacity (gal)

150

DO

Day Override

30

RT

Regen Time

2:00 AM

BW

Backwash

5 min

BD

Brine Draw

50 min.

RR

Rapid Rinse

5 min

BF

Brine Fill

5 min.

FM

Flow Meter Type

P0.7
 

dkriene

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Thanks for the assistance.

1) Yes, I have the domed paddlewheel meter.

2) I do not know the injector type. I will have to look tonight.
 
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