Reverse osmosis low pressure to refrigerator water dispenser

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Robert Gift

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No room in the kitchen. Reverse osmosis is on the basement floor.
Shall I raise ito the unfinished basement ceiling rafters to increase water pressure to the refrigerator?
(If I could, I'd place it in the attic to increase pressure through the 1/4-inch plastic tube down to the refrigerator.)

Thank you.
 

Fitter30

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2.31' to lb doesn't matter if the water is in a 1/4" tube or 12" pipe
23' = 10lbs
Some ro systems use a pump to increase pressure check with the manufacturer of your system.
 

Robert Gift

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2.31' to lb doesn't matter if the water is in a 1/4" tube or 12" pipe
23' = 10lbs
Some ro systems use a pump to increase pressure check with the manufacturer of your system.
Thank you.
Yes, stagnant pressure isame.
The 1/4-inch tube is long andikely causes some flow resistance.
Don't wanto pay for a pump.
 

Taylorjm

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Install a permeate pump. It made a big difference with ours. No electricity needed. At least until I decided to build my own ro filter system using a procon pump to increase pressure on the membrane to about 110psi and set the outgoing pressure to 60psi. The only downside is the carbonator procon pumps are noisy. It's in the basement and I can still hear it when it runs upstairs and 30' away, but it only runs about 10 seconds, then off for 30 seconds for about 20 minutes total to fill an expansion tank that provides us with about 5 gallons of water.
 

wintonpc

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Robert, did you arrive at a satisfactory solution?

I have a similar problem: iSpring RCC7AK, 1/4" tubing, system and tank on closet floor next to fridge. Filter bypass cap in fridge. City water pressure is 60psi. The system is a few months old; I don't think any of the filters should need replacing yet.

Tank -> post filter -> remineralizer -> 4 ft of 1/4" tubing -> 1/4" push-to-connect to 1/4" compression adapter -> fridge (4 ft of 5/16")

The flow rate out of the tank is 1.2 gal/min.
The flow rate out of the remineralizer is 0.7 gal/min.
The flow rate at the fridge adapter is 0.7 gal/min.
The flow rate out of the refrigerator dispenser is 0.3 gal/min.

The fridge itself seems to be the primary offender, but before installing the RO system, the dispenser flow rate was probably close to 1 gal/min (with fridge filter installed). Any ideas on what might help increase dispenser flow would be appreciated. Raising the tank a few feet off the ground had no effect. Maybe switch everything to 3/8" tubing after the tank? Move the tank after the post filter? Cut the compression fitting off the fridge line and use a push-to-connect 1/4" - 5/16" adapter?

Thanks.
 
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