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Paul E.

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Hey y'all, I am looking for some advice on how best to raise a recessed closet flange.

I releveled the bathroom floors, and need to raise the existing brass closet flange up 3/4" of an inch. Raising it 3/4" of an inch will put the new closet flange on top of the new flooring. The existing brass closet flange looks to have been soldered to a lead sleeve that passes down into a 4" dia. cast iron soil pipe. This vertical stub of cast iron pipe connects into a cast iron hub.

Attached are a few photos of what I'm working with, along with a sketch of what I think the assembly looks like.

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Jeff H Young

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I might use the twist and set ring and place a 1/2 inch shim between the 2 rings and screw to concrete
 

John Gayewski

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Thanks for the advice guys. I'm looking at the hydro seat and twist and set ring.



What would the lot of work option be?
Remove the concrete and either redo the cast iron, or convert it to pvc. You could possibly heat up and raise the flange also, but that might still require breaking up the concrete around the fittings.
 

Jeff H Young

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Thanks for the advice guys. I'm looking at the hydro seat and twist and set ring.



What would the lot of work option be?
chip the floor out put a no hub band below floor with plastic coming up through the floor and glue a new ring. I call that a lotta work couple hours besides all the BS like clean up itll take you most of a day
 

Paul E.

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Are there any benefits to converting it to PVC vs. working with the existing flange?

And would you go with a 4" shielded coupling on the existing soil stack over a Fernco donut in the cast iron hub?

Thinking this through, getting down to the hub would take more digging, but I would avoid cutting the existing soil stack down to height. Since I use an angle grinder to cut cast iron, I would have to open up enough concrete to get access to the cast iron pipe. I imagine there is some risk with the Fernco donut, as I risk damaging the hub in the removal of the existing soil stack and seating of the new pvc pipe.
 

Jeff H Young

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Id rather work with plastic on this its cheaper and lasts well Id get a flange with stainless steel ring not all plastic or painted metal not so good
 

John Gayewski

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Are there any benefits to converting it to PVC vs. working with the existing flange?

And would you go with a 4" shielded coupling on the existing soil stack over a Fernco donut in the cast iron hub?

Thinking this through, getting down to the hub would take more digging, but I would avoid cutting the existing soil stack down to height. Since I use an angle grinder to cut cast iron, I would have to open up enough concrete to get access to the cast iron pipe. I imagine there is some risk with the Fernco donut, as I risk damaging the hub in the removal of the existing soil stack and seating of the new pvc pipe.
This situation I don't think it would be beneficial to change to pvc. A cast iron or brass toilet flange is much stronger than any pvc product that I'm aware of.

Is your going to do the work I'd just two what you have but higher. No hub couplings are no good underground (but they do make an underground version) so I'd use a donut.
 

Jeff H Young

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I never install cast iron flanges on old houses except when like an instaset can be used . If Im putting a band on below the floor the rest is going to be plastic. Maybe just install new ring with lead and oakum no need to bust floor. Out here in my area I dont do that but east coast all those older cities I assume anybody doing any service work at all would still be doing that on regular basis . Agree the Cast iron is stronger than plastic good luck on job lets see how you complete it !
 

Paul E.

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Thanks for the input guys.

I think I will hold off on busting the concrete up and see if I can work with the existing brass flange. It looks like the brass flange is secured with a few concrete screws.

Here's the plan
1. Remove the screws.
2. Carefully raise the existing brass flange + soldered lead sleeve assembly. (Not sure if this will be successful)
3. Place an appropriate thickness spacer underneath the existing brass flange and lead sleeve, so that the flange sets proud of future tile floor.
4. Secure flange + spacer into concrete with tapcons.
 

Paul E.

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Turns out the lead pipe was not soldered to the brass closet flange, it was peened overtop it. The lead is fairly brittle. Can a new lead pipe/sleeve be purchased? I don't think I can pull this one up to my desired flange height without destroying it.

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Paul E.

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Decided to convert to PVC.

The lead sleeve was soldered to a brass coupling, which was leaded into the cast iron hub. All of that is out. I will clean up the hub and install a Fernco donut with PVC.

Does anyone know of a removable closet flange with a stainless steel ring? A push to fit/twist to fit/etc. I would like to use something that isn't glued in so there's future flexibility. The Sioux Chief PushTite 887-GPM fits the bill, but is being discontinued for some reason.

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Jeff H Young

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it looks like the hub ? use a donut with a piece of pvc and then glue a ring on it.
 
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