Pressure Switch dilemma: 2wells 2 outputs

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Dpwells

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Our 200' well output @2gpm lasts for around 2 hours before shutting down. It takes up to 24 hours to turn back on.

Our new 600' well output @2gpm lasts continuously. Each well has a new 35 gallon pressure tank and pressure switch.

Which tank gets set to 40/60 vs 30/50 to avoid the weaker well from shutting off?

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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I would set the 200' well to come on first with the 40/60 switch, just because it is only 200' deep. Sounds like it will supply what you need much of the time. Then when the first well is dry the second 600' well will come on using the 30/50 switch. Since this well "last continually" setting it to come on first might mean the 200' well never gets exercised. Make sure to use a good dry well protector like a Cycle Sensor on each pump.
 

Dpwells

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Thanks very much, sounds good. I will order them both today.

The switch is labelled 40/60. Can it be manually adjusted to 30/50 (actually to 28/48?) and if so, how is that done?

Thanks for the help.
 

Reach4

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To move a typical pressure switch 10 psi lower, for both cut-in and cut-out, rotate the nut on the big spring CCW 3.5 turns.
 

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All those pressure switches are the same. Just some come adjusted to 30/50, 40./60, or even 50/70. Get whichever switch is on the shelf and adjust it accordingly.
 

Dpwells

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All those pressure switches are the same. Just some come adjusted to 30/50, 40./60, or even 50/70. Get whichever switch is on the shelf and adjust it accordingly.
Good to know, thanks. I wasn't sure if they were different switches or if they were just preset. Do they automatically cut back or turn on 2 below the settings or doen't that matter?
 

LLigetfa

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Do they automatically cut back or turn on 2 below the settings or doen't that matter?
2 below? I assume you mean 2 PSI above the precharge? The switch cannot know what the precharge is set to so you have set it 2 PSI above what the precharge is. Make sure the air gauge and water gauge both agree on the pressure.
 

Dpwells

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2 below? I assume you mean 2 PSI above the precharge? The switch cannot know what the precharge is set to so you have set it 2 PSI above what the precharge is. Make sure the air gauge and water gauge both agree on the pressure.
I had mistakenly thought 40/60 got set to 38/58 and 30/50 to 28/48. My error. What do you mean to make sure air and water gauges agree on pressure?
 

LLigetfa

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What do you mean to make sure air and water gauges agree on pressure?
since one is normally used to measure air pressure and another gauge is normally used to measure the water pressure, to be sure they are 2 PSI apart, they both need to read accurately. You could of course, use just the air pressure gauge for all the readings but try not to leak out too much air in the process.
 

Dpwells

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since one is normally used to measure air pressure and another gauge is normally used to measure the water pressure, to be sure they are 2 PSI apart, they both need to read accurately. You could of course, use just the air pressure gauge for all the readings but try not to leak out too much air in the process.
Got it, thanks.
 

Dpwells

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Can I also install cycle sensors at both pressure tanks if there are hydrants at both well casings? The productive well has the hydrant teed into a water line off the pitless adaptor. The unproductive well hydrant has a separate water line looping into the wster room and back to the well casing.
 

Reach4

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Can I also install cycle sensors at both pressure tanks if there are hydrants at both well casings? The productive well has the hydrant teed into a water line off the pitless adaptor. The unproductive well hydrant has a separate water line looping into the wster room and back to the well casing.
I would say that you can put a cycle sensor ahead of each pressure switch, but the pressure tank is at the pressure switch. So same thing...

How the water is routed won't matter for this purpose.
 

Dpwells

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I would say that you can put a cycle sensor ahead of each pressure switch, but the pressure tank is at the pressure switch. So same thing...

How the water is routed won't matter for this purpose.
So the pressure tank does essentially the same thing as a cycle sensor?
 

LLigetfa

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So the pressure tank does essentially the same thing as a cycle sensor?
No. A Cycle Sensor is an electronic device that monitors current draw on the pump and cuts the power when the amps drop below the threshold. It also tracks rapid cycling.
 

Dpwells

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When I inquired at the company that makes them, I was told that hydrants prevented the usage of CSVs in my water treatment room, although I dont see why. So I assumed the same for the Cycle Sensors as well.
 

Bannerman

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was told that hydrants prevented the usage of CSVs in my water treatment room, although I dont see why.
When the water consumption flow rate is less than the flow rate the pump is capable of delivering, the CSV device will reduce the flow from the pump to match the consumption rate after the CSV. When flow from the pump is reduced, the pressure will increase so with yard hydrants located before the CSV, the hydrants will experience excessive water pressure which maybe 150 psi when only a small quantity of water is being consumed after the CSV.

For the pressure to the yard hydrants to be identical to the pressure delivered to the home fixtures, the hydrants will need to be plumbed after the CSV. Depending on the diameter and configuration of your well casing and supply piping, it is sometimes possible to install a CSV within the well casing or nearby to the well so every fixture after the CSV including the yard hydrants, will be supplied with constant pressure as controlled by the CSV.


I assumed the same for the Cycle Sensors as well.
A Cycle Sensor monitors the electrical power consumed by the pump. When the pump is moving the maximum amount of water possible, power consumption will be highest and will reduce as the flow rate is reduced or the height of the water within the well rises. If there is insufficient water remaining in the well to cause the pump to draw air, the amps will drop too low which will cause the Cycle Sensor to shut off the pump. Since a Cycle Sensor only monitors power consumption, the location of the yard hydrants will have no bearing on Cycle Sensor operation.
 
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