Pressure Switch dilemma: 2wells 2 outputs

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Reach4

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Ahh... old well and new well.

Is there voltage between terminal 1 and 4 on the left-hand pressure switch?

I suspect arrows at the wall should both be pointing away from the wall.
 

Reach4

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I checked to see if hydrant would pump water once I shut off the valve, and it did not. When I reopened the valve, the hydrant pumped water out.
Interesting. That does not mean that the pipe is not also connected to the old well.
 

Valveman

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The red and blue handled ball valves are both on the outlet side of their respective pressure tanks/switches. You can close either or both as you please. But as long as the check valves in the wells are working you do not have to close them.
 

Dpwells

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Ahh... old well and new well.

Is there voltage between terminal 1 and 4 on the left-hand pressure switch?

I suspect arrows at the wall should both be pointing away from the wall.
The terminals each have a single wire, none are shared.
 

Dpwells

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Interesting. That does not mean that the pipe is not also connected to the old well.
Right,,who knows. So I do need to shut the return valve handle when I run the new well to safely ensure no overload to the old well...assuming all I have done was to merely restrict use of the hydrant in the winter.
 

Dpwells

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The red and blue handled ball valves are both on the outlet side of their respective pressure tanks/switches. You can close either or both as you please. But as long as the check valves in the wells are working you do not have to close them.
Thanks, I was referring to the white handle controlling the line going out to the old well.

As to the red and blue handles, I may need to shut one when running the other well, alternating them weekly.

If I leave them both on with the 40/60 30/50 plan, the new well may never come on as long as there is water in the old well.
 

Reach4

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The terminals each have a single wire, none are shared.
I was interested if power from the breaker was reaching that pressure switch. I suspect the breaker is off.
 

Reach4

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Right,,who knows. So I do need to shut the return valve handle when I run the new well to safely ensure no overload to the old well...assuming all I have done was to merely restrict use of the hydrant in the winter.
Valveman addressed that -- both wells will have a check valve at the pump, so closing the valve is not necessary.

When you run a well pump, you normally don't have a valve between the well and the pressure switch. If you have a valve in that path, that should never be closed if power is being supplied to that well.
 

Dpwells

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Valveman addressed that -- both wells will have a check valve at the pump, so closing the valve is not necessary.

When you run a well pump, you normally don't have a valve between the well and the pressure switch. If you have a valve in that path, that should never be closed if power is being supplied to that well.
 

Dpwells

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I didn't know that the wells also had valves, makes sense thanks.

As to valves between the wells and pressure switches, I don't believe there are any but do appreciate the info.
 

Dpwells

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Valveman addressed that -- both wells will have a check valve at the pump, so closing the valve is not necessary.

When you run a well pump, you normally don't have a valve between the well and the pressure switch. If you have a valve in that path, that should never be closed if power is being supplied to that well.
If you were referring to the valve in the old well return line path, the incoming old well water effectively goes around it and into the house. However, if left open when running the new well, the new well water will travel to the old wel.. not a good thing?.. unless its check valve prevents any unforeseeable problems.
 

Reach4

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I didn't know that the wells also had valves, makes sense thanks.

As to valves between the wells and pressure switches, I don't believe there are any but do appreciate the info.
I think pipe B is from well 1. If that is correct, then valve C is between the well one pump and the pressure switch.
Pipe A is from well 2, and there is no valve between A and pressure switch G.

I presume pressure switch D controls well 1 pump, and I expect the breaker for well 1 is off.
 

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Dpwells

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I think pipe B is from well 1. If that is correct, then valve C is between the well one pump and the pressure switch.
Pipe A is from well 2, and there is no valve between A and pressure switch G.

I presume pressure switch D controls well 1 pump, and I expect the breaker for well 1 is off.
A and B are both old lines from the old well (#1). When I turn C off and on, water from the well hydrant immediately shuts off/turns back on.

The new well(#2) was recently installed. The incoming water is the black piping alongside the right side of blue tank and under D which controls Well 2. Its breaker is always on, as its outdoor hydrant is used daily to clear out the shale water outside. I plan on bringing the water into the house soon to alternate with the old well 1.

IMG_1912.JPG
 

Waterone

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When I inquired at the company that makes them, I was told that hydrants prevented the usage of CSVs in my water treatment room, although I dont see why. So I assumed the same for the Cycle Sensors as well.
Use one of these in the electric circuit of each pump, it will shut off the pump for a designated amount of time once it detects low amp draw, which signals pump running but not pumping. It does not need to be "plumbed" in, totally electronic. https://www.franklinwater.com/produ...devices/pumptec-single-phase-pump-protection/
 
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Dpwells

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Use one of these in the electric circuit of each pump, it will shut off the pump for a designated amount of time once it detects low amp draw, which signals pump running but not pumping. It does not need to be "plumbed" in, totally electronic. https://www.franklinwater.com/produ...devices/pumptec-single-phase-pump-protection/
Thanks for the link, but the 200' well's pump has a tendency of not restarting once turned off electrically unless I go out and shock the well.

This is probably due to all the iron oxide at the base of that particular well. An electrical pump protection shutoff device would otherwise be a great idea.

With winter here, I am manually switching between wells.
 
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