Non stop water coming from release valve!!!!!

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Doozy8

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Hello everyone. I am new to the forum. I found this site trying to research an issue I woke up to this morning.....Here we go

Water was releasing from my release valve uncontrollably this morning. Needless to say, my basement flooded. I am on a well, with a Square D pressure valve. Regardless of the valve on the pipes that I tried to shut off, it wouldn't stop the water. I finally realized to shut the power to the well pump and that finally stopped the water. After I was done cleaning up, I turned the breaker back on and the water did not come out the release valve, just whatever was left in the pipe. I don't want to put the breaker back on because I don't know what caused it and I can't predict if/when it's going to happen again. On another note, I have noticed previously that we lose water pressure in the house and a tap of the pressure valve will regain pressure immediately.

Is this just a faulty pressure valve that should be replaced at this time? Or is it or could it be something else.

In the pictures attached, the valve on the right under the pressure gauge is the valve that was spewing out the water.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!

Thank you very much
 

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Doozy8

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I've already changed the switch and added a 4" riser pipe and am in the process of changing the release valve now. Home Depot only had a 1/2" release valve when my old release valve was 3/4", so I had to get a 3/4" to 1/2" reducer and a 2" nipple and a hose connector so I can connect a short hose to run 2 feet away into the sump pit if this ever happens again.
Does this sound ok?

I appreciate the response and for your help. I am glad to know that I got the same answer here and in HD from 2 different people.

Thank you!
 

Masterpumpman

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Your pressure switch didn't turn off the pump. That's the reason the relief valve released the excess pressure to save your water system. Replace the pressure switch (and the 1/4" nipple) beneath and while you are at it replace the pressure guage. Then everything should work normal. If the relief valve leaks a little, replace it. Other than that you should be in business again.
 

DonL

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Doozy8,

Problems like this one are the reason that they make a pressure switch with a low pressure cut off.

They can be a pain to restart, But can be worth the $5 dollar extra cost.

Have a great Day.

DonL
 

Doozy8

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Doozy8,

Problems like this one are the reason that they make a pressure switch with a low pressure cut off.

They can be a pain to restart, But can be worth the $5 dollar extra cost.

Have a great Day.

DonL

Thanks Don! I appreciate that info. My original Square D pressure switch was a 40/60 and so is the new one. Is 40 the low pressure cut off? If not, can you please tell me the difference and give me the Square D model # so I can get that?

When you say it's a pain to restart, how does it get restarted and what is such a pain about it?

This was my first time today with this stuff, so I learned as I went and think I did a good job.

Thank you again
 

DonL

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The low cutoff is around 30 then it operates at 40/60.

If the pressure drops below 30 then it shuts off, and you have to hold a lever on the side of it, until it gets above 30.

If your system has a problem then you have to restart it manually using the lever.

The Model is ; Square D FSG2J24M4CP Water Pump Pressure Switch with Low-Pressure Cutoff


Have a good day.

DonL
 
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Valveman

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I don't think you have a low producing well so you don't need the low pressure cut off switch. Your problem is the nipple to the pressure switch is clogged. It won't let the pump come on when it should, and won't let the pump go off when it should. Which is why sometimes you don't have water in the house, and sometimes the pressure relief valve is blowing off. Even a brass nipple doesn't mean it won't clog up
 
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Doozy8

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I don't think you have a low producing well so you don't need the low pressure cut off switch. Your problem is the nipple to the pressure switch is clogged. It won't let the pump come on when it should, and won't let the pump go off when it should. Which is why sometimes you don't have water in the house, and sometimes the pressure relief valve is blowing off. Even a brass nipple doesn't mean it won't clog up as in this picture.

I had removed the nipple (riser pipe) and it wasn't clogged, but I replaced it anyway with a 4" rather than a 3" nipple. As for previously not having water in the house, it seems that the connectors on the old pressure switch were corroded and worn away. A simple tap of the switch would restore pressure immediately back to the house. When I was at HD picking up my materials, I did talk to a master plumber and he did mention cleaning out the nipple as well because it might be clogged. I figured I was replacing most of the parts, why not replace them all!
I was a great learning experience for me. Thanks for everyones help!
 
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DonL

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Sounds like your switch contacts were pitted.

When they get pitted then sometimes they weld together and cause the pump to keep running.

You can look at your old switch contacts and see if they are bad.

Sounds like you have your project under control.

Enjoy your day.

DonL
 

Valveman

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OK then! If the points on the pressure switch were bad, then you probably have a cycling problem. It is rare for the points to be corroded. They are usually burned away from cycling the pump on and off too much. That being said, burned points will usually keep the pump from coming on when you need it but, it is unusual for them to stick closed and keep the pump from going off and poping the pressure relief. But it is possible.
 

DonL

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Yes valveman, I agree.

But when the points get burnt from so many cycles , They become pitted.

When the points come together , it produces a large spark, and works like a Spot Welder,
Contacts get welded together.

I have seen it many time, on many relays. And a pressure switch is nothing more than a DPST relay, just that it uses pressure rather than voltage as the actuator.

Shit Happens.

Have a great day.

DonL
 

Ballvalve

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Points can burn from over draw of power - a pump going out. Check the amp draw. Or the pump is too big for the switch [unlikely]
 

DonL

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Most of them are rated for 2 HP, but not for outdoor use. Even tho many people use them outside.

Even when in a well house or a basement, they do good to last very long, with all the humidity.

And I agree ballvalve, even a bad start or run cap can burn the contacts, prematurely.


A stuck motor start contact or bad cap, makes smoke happen. In the real world...


Have a great evening.


DonL
 

Valveman

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Cycling on and off causes high amperage, stuck starter contacts, bad start capacitor, burned pressure switch points, and many other things. Smoke happens when these components have had all the cycling they can take.
 

Dimegirl

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I am a girl-and this is what i did when i woke up to my water from my well spewing out of the pressure valve...The 1st thing i did was turn the power off so i do not blow up or ruin my well pump.I knew it had to be my pressure switch since(not the pressure valve the water was coming out from) it had been giving me problems and shutting off every now and again...
(I am going to explain this in girl terms) This is what i did to fix my similar problem...
I went outside turned off the water switch (or the power off )to the well and walked straight to the grey box(it is in a picture above) There is a little plastic looking screw on top that you twist until the grey pressure switch box comes off...
After that you need to figure out what number your pressure switch is-You will need the correct numbers so when you go to the store you buy the right size...
On the inside of the grey box there are a bunch of numbers that are kinda hard to read so if you don't know what it all means- bring the grey pressure switch plastic cover to the hardware store with you.

I did not know what exact switch i needed so i brought the grey top to the hard ware store and the guys up there were able to figure it out for me.Come to find out i have a 40/60 pressure switch.
Then on the install part i did have some help since i have never installed this part on my well before...The next thing to do is find a crescent wrench(a wrench that you can make bigger or smaller by hand)
Go back to your well make SURE the power is still off and unscrew the old one(look underneath you will see where to unscrew it) with the wrench and screw on the new one and you are good to go and take that long over due shower.It really helped having someone out there on my first time but if i had to do it again it would be no problem.
You will be amazed what you can do when your backs against the wall and you put your mind to it. I saved myself a $250.00 service fee if i had to find someone to come out. I would of had to wait- who's going to come out on New Years Eve?
I hope this was helpful...~Marie
 

Boycedrilling

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The pressure relief valve is just that a sFety valve that is usually preset to 75 psi. If for some reason the pressure switch contacts don't open on high pressure, the pressure will continue to build. At the pop-odd pressure of the relief valve, it starts to open and relieve pressure so that you don't blowup and/or deadhead your system.

Many pressure relief valves are not plumbed correctly/completely. Plumbing code (UPC) requires that a pressure relief valve is either plumbed to a floor drain, with an air gap, or plumbed to the exterior of a building, with an insect proof screened outlet. Probably 90% of water system don't have this additional plumbing. Just one more thing a professional SHOULD be doing when they install a system.
 
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