Kitchen Drain Pipe and Vent Move

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GoldMaple

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Hello,

I'm renovating my kitchen and I have a few questions. Please refer to the attached pictures for context.

1. I would like to move my drain and hot & cold lines from the floor into the wall. The drain pipe below the floor drops straight to the concrete floor, about 8 feet. Just below the floor it transitions from ABS to galvanized pipe. My plan to move the pipe into the wall is to use two 45 degree elbows as shown in the picture at C. Does anyone see any issues with this approach?

2. As I'm researching how to move the drain pipe I read about vents needing to be 42" off the floor or 6 inches above the sink overflow. My vent is 25 3/8" above the floor. This leads me to a few more questions. (I do have to note that it has worked fine like this for about 60 years.) Anyway.

a. Do I have to raise the horizontal portion of the vent higher?

i. If yes, will the galvanized pipe fall if I cut it at "A"?

b. If the horizontal vent can stay I still have to cut the pipe at B.

i. Is it okay to use a Fernco coupler to an ABS pipe glued to a 45 degree elbow? Like in picture B.


Please advise. Thank you.

Martin
 

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Tuttles Revenge

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Not sure how cold you get in Edmonton, but that may be one reason the piping isn't in the wall. However, if you're confident you can insulate against the cold then I would move the water and the waste as you've proposed. 45's are prefered since they offer the least bend for waste. The vent could easily come out of the roof if you remove its horizontal support. Be prepared by strapping it prior to cutting. A recprocating saw will vibrate that pipe, so very securely strap that pipe.
 

GoldMaple

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Not sure how cold you get in Edmonton, but that may be one reason the piping isn't in the wall. However, if you're confident you can insulate against the cold then I would move the water and the waste as you've proposed. 45's are prefered since they offer the least bend for waste. The vent could easily come out of the roof if you remove its horizontal support. Be prepared by strapping it prior to cutting. A recprocating saw will vibrate that pipe, so very securely strap that pipe.
It can get very cold but I think given the short length it will be okay. Is there a method of strapping that pipe to prevent it from falling?

Also, given the vent has been in that location for decades and for the time I've lived here I have not experienced any drainage issues would you even attempt raising the vent?
 

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Depending on how close it is to a stud, I would add a block of wood to that stud then use metal strapping to secure it.. or if its a ways away, then I would add blocking from stud to stud and strap to that.
 

GoldMaple

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  1. Moving the drain and hot & cold lines from the floor to the wall is a common practice in kitchen renovations. Using two 45 degree elbows to transition from the floor to the wall should work as long as the slope of the drain is maintained and the pipes are properly supported.
  2. The minimum height for a plumbing vent varies by location and local code, so it's best to consult with a licensed plumber to determine if your vent is up to code. If your vent is too low, it may need to be raised. If you need to cut the galvanized pipe at point A, you'll need to provide proper support to the remaining section of the pipe to prevent it from falling. As for using a Fernco coupler to connect galvanized and ABS pipes, this is generally not recommended because the materials have different expansion and contraction rates, which can cause leaks over time. It's best to use compatible materials for your plumbing connections. Again, consulting with a licensed plumber can help ensure your plumbing changes are up to code and will function properly.
Okay. I'm not sure of the code here but I am going to raise the horizontal vent pipe simply for best practice. I'm going to cut the galvanized pipe off close to the ceiling and then support it with a riser clamp so it does not come crashing down. The length of the galvanized pipe, once I cut it off, will only be a few feet so a riser clamp should support it with no issues. I will then replace the entire vent with ABS.

The only issue to resolve is connecting the galvanized pipe to the ABS. The outside diameter of the galvanized pipe is 1 19/32", so just a little more that 1 9/16". Fernco states their couplers will connect ABS to Steel, cast iron, copper etc. So, I think I'm okay using them, unless there is a better way? Does anyone know the Fernco coupler that will connect this galvanized pipe to a standard 1 1/2" ABS pipe?
 

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A no hub band of any brand is fine to transition from ABS to Galvanized steel. They are the exact same outside diameter. Code typically wants a transition band, but they don't offer any benefit besides compliance.
 
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