Flush Valve to outlet seal leak - 1927 Palmer-Mullen toilet - Part 1

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SRB

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An old, but working, toilet is leaking on the underside of the tank at the flush valve outlet.
See pics. part of leaking area circled in yellow.

I can't tell if the seal/gasket is age hardened rubber or metal.
Anyone know where to get a replacement seal?

Replacement looks like:
Remove tank to bowl pipe via remove 2 nuts
Remove lock ring
Remove nut on bottom of tank
Replace seal and reverse.

The nut on the bottom of the tank could be a problem to loosen if it is frozen.
Would there be another nut on the inside of the tank that needs to be held so it doesn't spin?

Toilet always flushes and never clogs. Would like to see it get to 100 years old : )

Thanks
 

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Part 2 -

The Toilet is hard plumbed to the wall
I would like to be able to shut the water off just to the toilet to work on the seal problem, but the toilet is hard plumbed to the wall with no shut off.
It looks like bronze pipes.
The connections are almost 100 years old, so could be fragile.

I would like to install a shut off valve and flex line to the toilet.
Ideally, it would be good to take it back to the pipe coming out of the wall, but I'm thinking the 90 degree elbows are stronger, so maybe remove the pipe from the toilet to the first elbow, put the shut off there and run the flex line to the toiler.
Does that make sense?

Could I replace the fill valve at the same time, as I'm wondering if the old threads are the same as new ones on a flex line.

Thanks
 

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Peterson

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Beautiful toilet! You need to have a professional plumber tackle this, especially with installing the shut off lines, etc.

Taking the tank off the wall is going to be a challenge, and you will have to install new hanger bolts into the wall when you put it back.

It appears from what you described that the flush valve seal must be leaking. I would replace the entire flush valve with a new brass douglas flush valve and tank ball. That will eliminate any future problems you could have with the existing brass curtain flush valve (which I believe they don't make parts for anymore). I would also put a Korky Quietfill or FluidMaster fill valve in as well.

OR - if this is a very small, occasional drip, you could leave it alone and seal it with a little silicone caulk.
 
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BECplumbing

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Beautiful toilet! You need to have a professional plumber tackle this, especially with installing the shut off lines, etc.

Taking the tank off the wall is going to be a challenge, and you will have to install new hanger bolts into the wall when you put it back.

It appears from what you described that the flush valve seal must be leaking. I would replace the entire flush valve with a new brass douglas flush valve and tank ball. That will eliminate any future problems you could have with the existing brass curtain flush valve (which I believe they don't make parts for anymore). I would also put a Korky Quietfill or FluidMaster fill valve in as well.

OR - if this is a very small, occasional drip, you could leave it alone and seal it with a little silicone caulk.
It appears there is a leak between the flush valve and the tank. The seal will have to be replaced. Those old 1920s toilets in my opinion are better than anything they make today. I would replace the flush valve and flush valve seal.
 
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Thank you to Peterson and BECplumbing for your recommendations and insight.

Why does the tank need to be removed?
Actually, the heads of the screws or bolts holding it to the wall have mostly rusted away, so shouldn't be too hard to remove.
 

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I looked at that Douglas valve.
It looks like something is missing; the part that starts and stops the water flow?

Thanks
 

BECplumbing

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I looked at that Douglas valve.
It looks like something is missing; the part that starts and stops the water flow?

Thanks
Here is a link to a flapper that should work with the flush valve. This is the part you need

 

BECplumbing

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Thank you to Peterson and BECplumbing for your recommendations and insight.

Why does the tank need to be removed?
Actually, the heads of the screws or bolts holding it to the wall have mostly rusted away, so shouldn't be too hard to remove.
The tank actually may not even need to be removed but the flush pipe between the tank and bowl has to come off to remove the flush valve. the flush valve may be difficult to get off due to its age. I would only take the tank off the wall though if the bolts are severely rusted too the point where breaking the bolts is a concern which they usually aren’t that badly rusted.
 
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BECplumbing

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The tank actually may not even need to be removed but the flush pipe between the tank and bowl has to come off to remove the flush valve. the flush valve may be difficult to get off due to its age. I would only take the tank off the wall though if the bolts are severely rusted too the point where breaking the bolts is a concern which they usually aren’t that badly rusted.
But in your case I think removing the tank is a good idea due to the condition of the bolts. I would replace the bolts with new ones. A set of the proper screws or anchors would be needed to secure the tank depending on whether you have wood or drywall.
 
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Update
I tried the silicone seal route to save the original parts.
On the third try, it worked.
Thanks for the advice!
 
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