Expanding washer hose connections

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DirtyJerz

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Hi,
I currently have 1/2” copper pipe going to a gate valve and standard washer hose connectors for hot and cold water. This is hooked up with regular hoses to a full size washer.

In the near future, I’m going to be adding a bunch of things here: another full size washer, a pedestal washer (LG Sidekick), and a dryer with steam function.

So I’m ultimately going to need 4 cold water connectors and 3 hot water ones.

The sidekick comes with wye connectors, but it seems ridiculous (and risky?) to daisy chain those for everything else.

Garden hose wyes aren’t rated for hot water and probably wouldn’t fit anyway since I need the “expansion” of connectors to happen in opposite directions (left/right) for hot and cold pipes so they don’t collide.

So how do I do this? Was at Lowe’s the other day and nothing came to mind from looking at the various pipe/plumbing components in terms of how I would put this together.

Thanks!
 

Reach4

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Jeff H Young

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Garden hoses? as you say not for hot water , plus assuming this is inside a home or withen the building Why not washing machine hoses?
Its entirely dependant on how good a system you want , budget , etc. 3 washing machines too much on a 1/2 inch line. Draining 3 washing machines where you have 1 now I think need adressing as well. especially if meeting code is a concideration
 

DirtyJerz

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So the odds of all four things (3 washers plus dryer) running at once are pretty close to zero.

Existing piping is all exposed in the basement. Here’s the current setup:
F656E042-E821-49B1-8364-D3AB51DE1AEC.jpeg


So question is, I need to split the hot water line three ways to the left and cold water four ways to the right. What parts do I get at the store and how do I put them together to make it happen? At worst I’d like to split hot and cold at least once at the wall, the rest could be done with wyes if doing a permanent split is too complicated.
 

DirtyJerz

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And in case you’re wondering about the zip-tied moldy plastic tubing, that’s the condensate pump drain tube for the A/C installed by a “licensed contractor” before my time here (about ten years ago).
 

Reach4

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Split with GHT splitters, or split with copper pipe to more valves?

Interesting water hammer arrestors. I have not seen that type before.
 

Jeff H Young

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Its all very simple, If you use hose splitters use ones that don't have individual shut offs as most of those are pretty cheap quality.
depending if you care about meeting code or not the 1/2 inch will work but undersizes as might be drain piping.
You could put additional piping and shut off valves on wall to make it kind of clean (and be able to isolate the machines without shutting them all down).
 

Jeff H Young

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I'd personally run copper and strap to wall , that might be beyond scope for you as a DIY . I'd solder it . No real easy idea for you as a DIY if you don't want to get that involved , I suppose shark bites but I wouldn't go there. I'm sure some other ideas you might want to hire a plumbing contractor?
 

DirtyJerz

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Split with GHT splitters
seems like a bad idea since those aren't rated for hot water
split with copper pipe to more valves
I think this is what I'm looking for
Interesting water hammer arrestors
I think they are just old. You can still get them today but they are more expensive compared to the more standard ones. Apparently you can recharge them! https://riverbendhome.com/products/watts-lf150a-12-hammer-arrestor-sc50223-483158
I'd personally run copper and strap to wall
so the idea here would be —
  • cut off existing pipe right above it comes out from the wall
  • (using cold water as an example) add three tees plus elbow on the end with copper pipe between them. solder the connections, layout will look like this: ├ ┬ ┬ ┐
  • add individual valves on each end
Does that sound right?

What's your opinion of the Viega ProPress system?

I did just find this on HD, so maybe that's an easier option…https://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBi...ort-Closed-Manifold-Fitting-25553LF/302359487
 

DirtyJerz

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In terms of existing pipe topology, here’s what I have:
  • 3/4” pipe splits into two pipes
    • 3/4” for upstairs bathroom (sink, shower, toilet)
    • 1/2” for basement and kitchen
      • hot water splits into kitchen sink, dishwasher, and washing machine hookup
      • cold water splits into kitchen sink, washing machine, and outdoor hose spigot
 

Jeff H Young

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older style arrestors they may still make ones like that. sounds like you may be up for tackling this, the press fittings are good but takes special tools
BTW I see several splitters hot water approved of cource a solid brass without shut offs shouldnt fail either.
 

DirtyJerz

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older style arrestors they may still make ones like that. sounds like you may be up for tackling this, the press fittings are good but takes special tools
BTW I see several splitters hot water approved of cource a solid brass without shut offs shouldnt fail either.
Do you have a link handy?
 

Fitter30

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Most clothes washers use around 4-5 gpm. If two or more might consider 3/4" from the mains to get the best flow. Since you know what your getting can look at the submittals and run piping across the wall with valves close to where there needed to keep hoses short same with the electric having them on separate circuits.
 

DirtyJerz

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same with the electric having them on separate circuits
The outlets you see in the corner of the picture have their own dedicated 20A circuit on which there is nothing else, so I think the existing electrical should suffice.

For the water supply, I'm guessing I should tap the existing 3/4" line just before the reducer and run a new line for the additional loads. So the existing 1/2" can stay for one of the washers and the new 3/4" can supply the second washer + sidekick + steam dryer. Is there a need to have a reducer anywhere at that point?

The current drain is 2” ID.
 
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