Drain Box Outlet Layout..

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Rsaybe

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I like to make sure I'm installing these drain lines correctly. I'm including a rough photo basically showing how I planned to put this all together.

Washer Drain Layout 2.b.jpg




Does this look correct? I'm using 2" DSW drain pipes. Studs are a bit on the tight side at 14" so I laid this out while allowing me to have the p-trap within the stud. The washing machine stand pipe is 18" long.

The vent is off to the left about 20" away from the p-trap as noted in the photo.

I noted what each drain is being used for in the photo.

The small white box on the right stud is a gas outlet dryer box.

Does this all look acceptable?
 

wwhitney

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On the vent takeoff, your drawing looks like a san-tee on its back, but it needs to be a combo.

Not really sure of the requirements for having 3 different entries to the same standpipe, but it looks plausible. A couple comments on that:

With the water supplies to the left of washer standpipe, they'll need to cross over the DWV within the stud bay, which could be tight. So you might put the water supplies on the right of the washer standpipe.

Also, you could separate the water supplies from the washer standpipe and use a separate box for the washer standpipe. That would let you put all three standpipe entries in the same stud bay and use a double wye for combining them.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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John Gayewski

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As above, if you are going to keep this layout you should move the right drain to the left so your water can come in from the right otherwise there's not really room.
 

Rsaybe

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On the vent takeoff, your drawing looks like a san-tee on its back, but it needs to be a combo.

Not really sure of the requirements for having 3 different entries to the same standpipe, but it looks plausible. A couple comments on that:

With the water supplies to the left of washer standpipe, they'll need to cross over the DWV within the stud bay, which could be tight. So you might put the water supplies on the right of the washer standpipe.

Also, you could separate the water supplies from the washer standpipe and use a separate box for the washer standpipe. That would let you put all three standpipe entries in the same stud bay and use a double wye for combining them.

Cheers, Wayne

Hi Wayne, thanks for the inspection. :)


About the tee on it's back which I have for the vent takeoff, Is this what your saying I should use instead?

Wye and 45 elbow Combo1.JPG


A wye and 45 degree elbow combo?


My water supplies are all coming from the left side of that wall. The water heater, softener are all on the left side. That is true though, it can get a little tight passing over the DWV pipes, although I was planning on using pex for these washer lines. I figured it's easier to manipulate and bend around as opposed to copper.


However I do like the idea having all three drains in one bay and using the double wye for combining them. One less hole in the stud is a welcoming thought.

Although I may need to move that middle stud over to the right about 1-1/2" to get those drain boxes to fit right. Still preferable than making another hole.

Should I come across the top of the boxes with the water lines, then down into that last bay shown and to the left into the boxes, as opposed to running them across from right to left over the DWV pipes?
 

wwhitney

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About the tee on it's back which I have for the vent takeoff, Is this what your saying I should use instead?
A wye and 45 degree elbow combo?
Yes, although you don't need a 2" vent, so you could use a 2x2x1-1/2" combo or wye.
Should I come across the top of the boxes with the water lines, then down into that last bay shown and to the left into the boxes, as opposed to running them across from right to left over the DWV pipes?
I probably would avoid crossing the supply lines and the DWV if not terribly inconvenient.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rsaybe

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Yes, although you don't need a 2" vent, so you could use a 2x2x1-1/2" combo or wye.
Right, 2x2x1-1/2" combo. Thanks for that. Will go that route.

I probably would avoid crossing the supply lines and the DWV if not terribly inconvenient.

I have no way to avoid crossing over and past the vent pipe as the water lines will be coming from the left side.

However I could run the water lines over to the washer box outlets from above the drain boxes after the vent pipe. Does this make sense?

If you can visualize this.


Although I missed to mention, the studs on the wall are 2x6 so maybe running the water lines over the DWV pipes won't be such a tight fit?
 
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wwhitney

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In a 2x4 wall, I'd say it might be worth going high with the water lines to end up crossing the 1-1/2" vent rather than the 2" drains. But in a 2x6 wall, you could go either way.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rsaybe

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Alright, got it. Thank you so much.

I have one more question. Would like to verify this, I have heard about the setup needing to be a minimum of 6" from the floor. Is this refeering to the stand pipe, p-trap or the center of the 20" pipe I have coming off the p-trap going to the left towards the vent (as shown in the photo)?

What is this minimum of 6" referring to?

Would like to make sure I get this correct.
 

Weekend Handyman

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I like to make sure I'm installing these drain lines correctly. I'm including a rough photo basically showing how I planned to put this all together.

View attachment 81739



Does this look correct? I'm using 2" DSW drain pipes. Studs are a bit on the tight side at 14" so I laid this out while allowing me to have the p-trap within the stud. The washing machine stand pipe is 18" long.

The vent is off to the left about 20" away from the p-trap as noted in the photo.

I noted what each drain is being used for in the photo.

The small white box on the right stud is a gas outlet dryer box.

Does this all look acceptable?
Great diagram. Makes what you are asking very clear.
 

wwhitney

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I have one more question. Would like to verify this, I have heard about the setup needing to be a minimum of 6" from the floor. Is this refeering to the stand pipe, p-trap or the center of the 20" pipe I have coming off the p-trap going to the left towards the vent (as shown in the photo)?

What is this minimum of 6" referring to?
Good question, it's not clear. The relevant section of the UPC is:


which says "No trap for a clothes washer standpipe receptor shall be installed below the floor, but shall be roughed in not less than 6 inches (152 mm) and not more than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor." So the trap is supposed to be 6" above the floor. But 6" to what point on the trap?

Certainly if you put the bottom of the trap at 6" above the floor it will comply, as that is the lowest point you might measure to. And the trap is under 12" tall, so then the highest point you might measure to is under 18". As to whether you could go lower, on the basis that the measuring point should be the mid height of the u-bend, or of the midheight of the outlet, I don't know.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rsaybe

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Height of a trap is measured at the trap weir.


I have never heard of the trap weir. I did find an image showing were this trap weir is.

Trap Weir.jpg


I took a measurement using my p-trap at that given trap weir location, and with a minimum of 6" from the floor this would put the bottom of the trap sitting on top of the sill plate.

P-Trap Minimum.JPG



Perhaps that's were the six inch minimum comes from.


Hmm, It's OK to have the bottom of the p-trap resting on the sill plate?

Would this be considered correct or acceptable? Seems odd.
 

Rsaybe

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Wanted to show another photo with the suggested layout. Will need to move that center stud over 2" to accommodate the three drain outlets in the left bay making the right bay a bit smaller at only 12" spacing.

Washer Drain Layout Using Double Wye1.jpg



I'm thinking of running the water lines from above and around into the box as marked in red and blue lines in the photo.

The one thought I had was, is it best to have the the double wye placed down lower towards the trap or are we OK at it's position as seen in the photo?
 

wwhitney

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Looks like the only reason to move the stud is because you have 3 individual boxes, and you need to leave space between them, so the trim rings won't overlap. On the double wye, you could use street 45s for a more compact arrangement. So if you could find one big box with the proper spacing on the openings (or perhaps a single box and a double box), you could possibly avoid moving the stud.

On the water supplies, you could turn that box upside down to avoid 2 of the 90s.

On the double wye, the lower you put it, the move total volume you'll have before the trap to handle temporary large flows. Perhaps that was the point of John's post, that putting 18" vertical upstream of the double wye for each one is wise, not sure. I would think that it would make sense to put whichever fixture has longest, fastest flow into the middle opening.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rsaybe

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That is true, with this current setup the stud will need to be moved over to accommodate the three individual boxes and still have the trim rings fit right.

I don't mind so much having to do that. It's fairly simple. The entire wall is open with no sheetrock yet. I have full access.


I do have two street 45s that I could use on both left and right drains which would bring the double wye up some. And by placing the trap a little lower I can have a single 18" standpipe (as shown in the photo).

Washer Drain Layout 2a.JPG



And if the 6" minimum from the p-trap is from the trap weir then I'm still within the allowable distance. The photo also shows were that 6" distance puts us with the trap.


I also flipped the washer outlet box upside down to get the water lines running from above as you suggested. The bottom of all the boxes are sitting at 36" from the floor.

Does this all look right? Or would it work better if the double wye was placed down the line sitting over the trap?

Now I don't expect all three drains to ever be running simultaneously. The softener drain only occurs when regeneration and the sediment filter/AC drain does not get used often.

The washing machine will be the most used although I do prefeer having that hose placed into the right drain as to not cross the other hoses. The softener drain hoses will be coming from the left side.


Also, I have a gas dryer box being installed onto that right stud. Does the bottom of this box need to be a certain height from the floor? Does it even matter?
 

John Gayewski

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Gas outlet doesn't have a height. Just what works best for the appliance or if the appliance has a requirement.
 
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