Connecting toilet to 45* soil stack/final design design corrections

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dart131

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Hello Terry,I have slowly come to the conclusion that none of the plumbing in my house was done to code. I am pretty well redoing the entire thing, I have used this forum to discover most mistakes and find solutions just want to make sure that I am understanding everything correctly..

1) My downstairs 3 inch toilet drain connects to a 45* 3 inch soil stack with a sanitary tee ? is this allowed? or does the soil stack need to be 90*, I am curious because this toilet has been disconnected for awhile, I have cleaned the pipe etc, but today i took the pipe off again (the old glue didnt hold at all, I've been tension holding it since) and noticed there was a little bit of sewage in it, most likely from the upstairs toilet connected to the same stack. Could also be coming up from the ejector sump pump, but i doubt it.

2)Neither of the toilets' have vents, they are both less than 6ft away from the soil stack, above the second story the soil stack continues (3 inch pipe all the way) as a dry stack vent. I will be venting both toilets by connecting to the 3 inch stack 6 inches above the highest fixture point in my upstairs closet wall. Though , do I need to vent the upstairs toilet aswell? It is the highest drain line to connect to the main stack, there are no fixtures connected above, and it is all 3 inch dry vent, or do I need to plumb in a separate 2 inch vent? my understanding is I will only need to add vent to downstairs toilet because its currently using a wet vent that runs 2 stories which is a no go, otherwise a toilet connected to the 3 inch stack vent is fine as long as its dry?

3) I have read that a sewage sump needs its own vent line, but I cant find anything on it for the Ontario building code, I will be venting it and also joining in my upstairs closet. It is currently vented with 1 1/2 inch pipe, I will be swaping it with 2 inch, can I tie in a vent for a basement sink and 3 piece bathroom into this 2 inch sewage sump vent? all connections will be done 6" above flood line of highest fixture. I have seen it done, but I have also seen people say that sewage sump pumps need their own vent to roof exit, is this something that has variance from area to area?

4) I will be joining two(or three depending on upstairs toilet) new 2 inch vent pipes into my 3 inch stack, is there a particular way to do this? Because of where the studs and 3 inch dry vent are it will be easiest to join the 2 inch pipes horizontal and then tie into a T off the 3inch pipe, is that too long of a horizontal run (wont be able to put any slope on it as it will be 2 connections, ie T joining 2 inch pipes, connected to another T joining the 3 inch pipe.

5) If you notice anything in the pictures of drawings that makes u worry let me know (though my drawings may be a bit off)


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Red lines are vents I will be adding​

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Reach4

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From a functional point of view, having a vent for the sealed sewer pit is important. Two inch pipe, and from a functional view, joining other 2 inch vent pipes should be fine. 1.5 inch pipe would normally function, but the codes I know want 2 inch. From a functional point of view, having a vent for a toilet line will usually not improve things.

I did not follow your bit about the 45 degrees. Usually having something at 45 degrees is good, but I cannot be sure what you meant. The photos don't clarify that to me.

From a code point of view, I don't think adding an additional vent to the left toilet (in the plan view sketch) improves things. I expect the vented lavatory wet vents the toilet.
 

dart131

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Awesome thanks so much for the reply. Yes I dont think I will add a vent to the left toliet, the total pipe length seems to be just under 6 ft, dry vent above, so I think its good.

For the bit about 45 degrees, hopefully these photos will make it more clear. Simply put the soil stack is vertical, takes a 45 degree towards the septic line out, it is after the 45 degree elbow that the toilet connects to the soil stack (ie where the soil stack is 45 degrees off vertical.)
 

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dart131

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this link here is what got me wondering if that junction is correct

 

dart131

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From a functional point of view, having a vent for the sealed sewer pit is important. Two inch pipe, and from a functional view, joining other 2 inch vent pipes should be fine. 1.5 inch pipe would normally function, but the codes I know want 2 inch. From a functional point of view, having a vent for a toilet line will usually not improve things.

I did not follow your bit about the 45 degrees. Usually having something at 45 degrees is good, but I cannot be sure what you meant. The photos don't clarify that to me.

From a code point of view, I don't think adding an additional vent to the left toilet (in the plan view sketch) improves things. I expect the vented lavatory wet vents the toilet.
My last question is about horizontal vent on the toilet below flood line of toilet. The ontario code says it is allowed as long as the structure limits any other solutions. The attached photo is a design I could do , in order to achieve nothing under 45 degree I either need to increase the wall bump out, or move the HVAC vent and try and squeeze the toilet vent in front, both are rather difficult.
The other option is I give the toilet drain line a 135 degree bend, use a sanitary y 45 to take the vent behind the HVAC vent, it would then be horizontal for about 3 inches(coming off the top of a sanitary Y with the 45 degree putting upward).
I am hesitant to do this method as the increase in bends in the drain could be problematic (though the total drain line is just under 2ft ) and having horizontal in my vent line , however it is horizontal above and off the drain line, so I am not too worried except for code regs.
I assume that a sanitary tee with the vent pipe pointing horizontal, followed by a 90 degree vertical bend cannot be done, as the vent is off the side of the drain and not the top?
The last photo is one I found all over the internet, but i assume this is no up to regulation? any advantages to this design? this would be most convient, but to me it has a lot of horizontal line
 

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Jeff H Young

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I cant tell whats wrong with your current rough? The illustration marked indirect connection no longer flys in the USA that Im aware of , Canada I have no idea
 
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