Concrete Cistern Connections

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henjj

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I have a 3000 gallon concrete cistern being brought to my property in a few days. I'm looking for advice on how to make the connections into and out of the tank. The tank comes with 2" galvanized fittings for the inlet and the outlet. Here is the diagram of the cistern I have coming: https://www.wilbertprecast.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/1710P_109.pdf. I have 1 1/4" poly from my well to my house. I'm going to cut the line and elbow it into and out of the tank. I had one guy at a hardware store tell me to just use PVC connections. Is this kosher? Or should I use Galvanized or something else?
 

Valveman

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Maybe I don't understand. But you can't just put pipe into and out of a cistern to get water on to the house. You will need to fill the cistern with a pipe from the water well, and install a pump in the cistern to attach the pipe going to the house. I would think with an in ground cistern a submersible well pump would be easiest to install. They will not fit though a 2" fitting so you will need to make a large hole in the manhole cover to fit a 4" or 5" well seal to hold the pump up.

But maybe the 2" fittings are at the bottom of one side and a jet pump could be installed in a pit. Still confused.

Well feeding cistern with sub booster.jpg
Jet pump from cistern.jpg
 

henjj

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I'll have a submersible pump in the cistern. I have one of the hallmark pumps that has been suggested. It will be set up like the first picture. I'll put it in a sleeve like shown here (https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/lets-talk-inducer-sleeves.78342/#post-570428) and just lay it on its side in the bottom of the cistern like shown here (https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/need-some-advise.105832/).

I'm just wondering what kind of connections from the poly pipe to and from the cistern are best? The fittings that come on the concrete tank are galvanized. Should I used galvanized or PVC to make the connections to the poly?
 

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I don't see how you could use the 2" connections with a 3.5" submersible. I usually make a hole in the man hole cover for the pipe and wire from the pump to come through. You can use a regular 5X1 well seal for the pipe and wire to come out of. Since you are laying the pump on its side in a cradle, the well seal will not be holding any weight. I would just use 1" poly in 125 or 160 class and long brass barb fittings. You can run the 1" poly through the well seal and go straight to the PK1A kit. From there you can attach to any kind of pipe that is going to the house.

flow inducer install.jpg
 

henjj

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The 2" fittings on the cistern are at the bottom of the tank one side (see diagram below). I was planning on just using 2" x 1-1/4" reducer couplings along with barb fittings to make the connections into and out of the tank. Is there any reason this wouldn't work? I have a photo attached with an idea of what I'm thinking. The little carboard box represents the cistern. Just want to make sure I'm not way off. Thanks!

IMG_1253.jpeg
Screenshot from 2023-10-12 09-41-20.png
 

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Never seen a tank with threaded fittings on the inside. Wouldn't think they would last long. Also, looks like it would make installing and/or removing the pump very difficult. Since you are laying the pump on its side you really don't even need a 5" hole and well seal. Just use the manhole cover as the well seal. When you pull the cover the pump, pipe, and wire come out as well. Or just leave slack in the wire and poly pipe so you can just move the manhole cover to the side and pull everything up by the pipe.

What you are planning will work, but you also need a place for the wire and will have to get in the tank to make the connections.
 

henjj

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I figured I would post some pictures of what I ended up doing for future reference for people. I'm hooking up all the electrical stuff tomorrow and will post a few pictures of that when it is done. This forum has been helpful. Thanks.

IMG_1309.jpeg

IMG_1301.jpeg
IMG_1302.jpeg
 

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The pitless adapter is pretty ingenious! I think I would leave a pull pipe screwed into the the top of the pitless, as deep under water it will be hard to stab. Also, I would use some good electric tape over the galvanized fittings that are screwed into the brass pipe. Without the tape electrolysis from the two dissimilar metals will eat the galvanized out very quickly.

The flow inducer also looks great. But the insert fittings look like plastic and only have one clamp. That is your weak point. I would have used extra long brass barb fittings and at least two hose clamps. You can't get the hose clamps tight enough on a plastic barb fitting, and having just one clamp leaves a wrinkle under the screw or buckle than can leak. Two clamps with buckles on opposites sides solves that problem.

Then with a PK1A on the outside to control the pump you will have the perfect water system. :)
 

Reach4

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I think I would consider adding a pipe support near the top of the PVC. I am not sure it is needed, since this is not in a position to get bumped.

I was thinking that the silvery stuff was stainless, but if it is not, I like the idea of using the Scotch 33+.
 

henjj

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Thanks for the advice. I put a couple more clamps on the plastic fittings and wrapped the galvanized pipe in electrical tape. Hopefully it holds up. Attached is a picture of the set up in my basement. I had a friend help me with all the electrical. Tank is filling now. The well pump runs for about a minute, then the cycle sensor kicks in and I have it set for a 10 min break. I figure it will take about 2 days to fill the cistern. I went ahead and used one of the cheap hallmark pumps in the cistern. Seems like it is working fine. The cost I was quoted to have someone come and install the cistern was $13k. The cost for me doing it was about $7k ($4k for the cistern, $1.5k for excavation, about $1.5k for fittings, wire, pipe, pump, cycle sensor, etc).

IMG_1310.jpeg
 

Reach4

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You probably ended up with a better system than the $13k one. It would have been better to use brass, bronze, plastic, or copper piping instead of galvanized. I should have piped up earlier when you asked.

Once your tank gets more Should be fine. You will probably need two shielded couplings in addition to what you thought you would need. Those will add thickness. They could be on the jogged section to give clearance.

Follow?

Alternatively, leave the piping as is. Instead screw and glue so some 2x4 or 4x4 blocks to the sides of the existing studs. Attach your new mount into those blocks.Should be fine. You will probably need two shielded couplings in addition to what you thought you would need. Those will add thickness. They could be on the jogged section to give clearance.

Follow?

Alternatively, leave the piping as is. Instead screw and glue so some 2x4 or 4x4 blocks to the sides of the existing studs. Attach your new mount into those blocks.Should be fine. You will probably need two shielded couplings in addition to what you thought you would need. Those will add thickness. They could be on the jogged section to give clearance.

Follow?

Alternatively, leave the piping as is. Instead screw and glue so some 2x4 or 4x4 blocks to the sides of the existing studs. Attach your new mount into those blocks.reserve water, you might compare how things work with a 20 minute off-time rather than 10 minute. It might give almost as much water, and it might give a lot less water. That will depend on the characteristics of the well.
 

Sylvan

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Replace the galvanized with brass and in 20 years you will be thankful.
 
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