Can tube and shell (pool) heat exchangers be used for potable applications?

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james b

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I have an application where I want to use a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will exchange heat between the boiler return and the water heater inflow. I want to use a shell and tube heat exchanger also known as a pool heat exchanger because of the lower psi loss and because I can spare the space. I realize that brazed plate heat exchangers are more commonly used for this application. I have not been able to get a definitive answer regarding weather or not shell and tube heat exchangers are rated for potable water.

Does anyone have any information regarding pool heat exchangers and potable water?

http://www.brazetek.com/


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James
Seattle, WA
 

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I have an application where I want to use a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will exchange heat between the boiler return and the water heater inflow. I want to use a shell and tube heat exchanger also known as a pool heat exchanger because of the lower psi loss and because I can spare the space. I realize that brazed plate heat exchangers are more commonly used for this application. I have not been able to get a definitive answer regarding weather or not shell and tube heat exchangers are rated for potable water.

Does anyone have any information regarding pool heat exchangers and potable water?

http://www.brazetek.com/


Regards
James
Seattle, WA
I don't believe so since it's considered a cross connection with non potable water. In addition the system will need a rpba backflow assembly which will drop your pressure.
 

hj

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quote; I don't believe so since it's considered a cross connection with non potable water. In addition the system will need a rpba backflow assembly which will drop your pressure.

What does ANY of this have to do with the question? He is merely asking if a "pool type" heater can be used for heating domestic water, and normally the answer would be yes.
 
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