Well Pump & Pressure Tank - layout/plumbing advice

Users who are viewing this thread

KBradley

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Connecticut
Need to replace my pressure tank. Going with a larger Pentair WM-14WB (47 gal) fiberglass tank and a conventional tee at the bottom with integral pressure gauge & cut-off switch. Originally wanted to go with the Flex-Lite FL17, but no stock anywhere, unless you want to pay double the price. Anyway, the existing plumbing looks inefficient and sloppy. Figured while I had the piping apart, I would replumb/reroute the lines and move the pump off the blocks.
Currently fitted with a Goulds 1/2hp J5S pump.

- Is there any reason at all to have the pump stacked up on blocks like this? I was thinking of moving the pump down to the concrete pad (which is already about 12" off the basement ground floor), and simply putting a rubber anti-vibration block below it to sit on. Would you agree?
- Was planning to remove the existing cut-off switch from the pump and utilizing the one that comes with the new "tee" assembly, as well as remove the existing pressure gauge.
- Will need to pull the new larger tank "forward" a bit to clear the white PVC drain pipe at the back, as the new tank will be taller and won't clear the pvc drain pipe.
- All lines are currently copper, so I can easily re-configure, as needed
- Would anyone be willing to sketch up how they would ideally plumb this, and layout the pump & tank, if they were starting from scratch?
- Assume you ideally want the pump and tank as close together as possible, with as few 90 deg bends as possible
Thank you for any suggestions. I would like to do this "correctly" while I have it apart, and looking for advice from the guys with more experience. Have never owned a house with a well pump before this one (always had city water).

WM-14WB:
WM-14WB Tank.jpg
Tee Assembly w/gauge & switch:
tee assy1.jpg
Existing layout in basement:

20211122_175023 (Large).jpg20211122_175038 (Large).jpg20211122_175218 (Large).jpg
 

Attachments

  • 20211122_175105 (Large).jpg
    20211122_175105 (Large).jpg
    79.4 KB · Views: 89

Valveman

Cary Austin
Staff member
Messages
13,446
Reaction score
973
Points
113
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Website
cyclestopvalves.com
If you want to do it "correctly" you will use a Cycle Stop Valve and only a 4.5 gallon size tank. Won't have to worry if it will clear the drain pipe or fit where you want. The CSV with a 4.5 gallon tank will do a much better job than just a 47 gallon size tank that will cause the pump to cycle for every 14 gallons used. You would also like the strong constant pressure in the shower compared to the on/off cycling every 14 gallons. Here is a pic of how a J5S looks with a PK1A, and a link for references from people who have done this. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/reviews

And yes you can lower the pump to the floor.

PK1A on jet pump.jpg
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,028
Reaction score
3,777
Points
113
Location
IL
Going with a larger Pentair WM-14WB (47 gal) fiberglass tank
I recommend against that. That tank has a bladder, and you want one with a diaphragm for longer life.

For a good 44 gallon tank, consider the WX-250 or WX-250D. Click Inbox, above.
 
Last edited:

KBradley

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Connecticut
If you want to do it "correctly" you will use a Cycle Stop Valve and only a 4.5 gallon size tank. Won't have to worry if it will clear the drain pipe or fit where you want. The CSV with a 4.5 gallon tank will do a much better job than just a 47 gallon size tank that will cause the pump to cycle for every 14 gallons used. You would also like the strong constant pressure in the shower compared to the on/off cycling every 14 gallons. Here is a pic of how a J5S looks with a PK1A, and a link for references from people who have done this. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/reviews

And yes you can lower the pump to the floor.

View attachment 80391
I had come across this arrangement before, and wondered how well they worked vs. conventional pressure tanks, and was intrigued. Seems as if most people who have installed them have been pleased with the results. Any downsides at all (or things to be aware of) to the CycleStop arrangement vs. a "conventional" pressure tank?
 

Valveman

Cary Austin
Staff member
Messages
13,446
Reaction score
973
Points
113
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Website
cyclestopvalves.com
The small tank will make the pump cycle on/off for small uses of water. The CSV will eliminate all on/off cycles when using water for longer periods of time. But the overall number of on/off cycles is the same as with the large tank. The differences are that with the PK1A you will always have strong constant pressure with less cost, space, and trouble than a large tank. The only downside is if you sell pumps and tanks for a living as it will make the pump last much longer and uses a smaller tank. It is called a disruptive product because it is disruptive to the pump industry, and is also why you won't find any pump manufacturer saying a word about it. They hope you don't find out about it.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks