Sulfer smell with new water heater

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Ennis Davis

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I installed a new water heater and smell sulfer only on hot water. Its well water but the cold water doesnt smell and it only happened after the
new heater was installed. The plumber said crank the heat up which helped a bit but the smell is still there. From what I have read its what the
anode is made out of. Has anyone heard of this problem?
 

Jeff H Young

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yes its common but not on first day of install when did water heater go in? I remember My florida home and allmost all of the water had the stinkj in 60s and 70s
 

WorthFlorida

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A common problem. Anode rods can be a bear to remove. Rods in three pieces allow one to be installed if the ceiling is too low.


From a google search.
Well water contains bacteria and iron that corrode magnesium anode rods. Titanium or aluminum alloy rods have more resistance to corrosion and bacterial growth. Hence, they don't make hot water smelly. The basic purpose behind installing an anode rod is to protect your water heater from corrosion.
 
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WorthFlorida

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yes its common but not on first day of install when did water heater go in? I remember My florida home and allmost all of the water had the stinkj in 60s and 70s
South Florida does have sulfur water. Well in the 40' range has iron, after that sulfur. I had an irrigation well 83' and stunk to high heave. Palm Beach County.
 

WorthFlorida

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The plumber said crank the heat up which helped a bit but the smell is still there. From what I have read its what the anode is made out of.
The old water heater rod was probably full expended, therefore no smell. Cranking up the heat is to take care of the bacteria. It has to be at least 140 degrees but a mixing valve would be needed to get water down to 120 degrees for safety.
 

Reach4

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Since you are in Florida, I suspect you don't have a drilled well with a submersible pump. If you did, I would suggest sanitizing your well and plumbing, including the WH.

But switching to the aluminum anode would help. Anodes are hard to get out, but not as hard when the WH is new. Can you see a hex head for the anode? If not, the anode is probably incorporated into the nipple for the hot.
 

Ennis Davis

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I bought an aluminum/zinc anode to help with the smell. How hard are they to change out. Any water leakage during the change out?
 

WorthFlorida

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New water heater it will be tough but not as bad with an old unit. You might want to have a friend help hold the WH from turning on you. It can take quite a bit of torque. If you have a 1/2” breaker bar is ideal. Impact wrench is the easiest.
 

Ennis Davis

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I tried to find the anode nut. There is a plastic
Cover, i pulled it off and its filled with some
Type of material. Is this the right area?
 

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Reach4

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Some WHs have their anode attached from the bottom of the hot water nipple, rather than having a 1-1/8 hex-head.

You might call the WH maker for info. Have the model number handy.
 
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Reach4

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How does the hot water nipple screw into the anode. The anode is sold. I dont understand that.
Different anode.

eastman-water-heater-anode-rods-60288-64_100.jpg
Image is a flexible replacement anode integrated with the hot nipple. The flexible version is to accommodate avoiding the ceiling. The original would not be flexible.

water-heater-anode-rods-eb99004-e1_100.jpg
The conventional anode rods would have the hex head.
 

Ennis Davis

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I tried a 1/2 torque wrench and 1 1/16 socket. Annode would not budge and its
A brand new water heater. Is an impact driver safe to use. Didnt know if the vibration could
Crack the glass liner.
 

Reach4

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Impact driver, like the old ones we would hit with a hammer? Or impact wrench? I am not a pro. I would did use an impact wrench with an impact socket. But I don't know if it could damage the lining, but the WH still works fine. I put a powered anode. Unfortunately, the Ceranode unit I put in is no longer offered.

If you get it free, what do you plan to put into the hole?
 
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