Seeking Well Water Treatment Recommendations - Water Softener and more

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Mathelo

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I've been in the same house in Connecticut with the same well for many years and haven't take my well water quality seriously until very recently. I'm spurred into action by what I believe is an iron bacteria problem - red slime on whole house filter - and red stains on sinks, tubs, toilets, etc. So I'll need to sterilize my well before doing much more. And I know I have a high radon problem that needs to be addressed. And a water softener appears to be in order for our hard water.

I've attached a water test performed by simplelab. This sample was taken at the kitchen faucet with no filtering. I was expecting hard water (231 mg/l) (13.96gpg) and iron (1.08) but I was a bit surprised by the lead (0.0192) and uranium (0.081). We are immediately switching to bottled water for drinking and cooking.

So where should I start? I'm thinking a Clack based softener is where I start but will this be able to handle the iron? Will I also need need iron extraction before the softener? I'm also figuring the only way to address the uranium (lead too probably) is with a RO at primary point of use.

Any initial thoughts?

Thanks in advance.

Louis
 

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Mathelo

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Got my Radon report back. Much as I expected. :(
Gross Alpha Activity 37.9 pCi/L
Gross Beta Activity 33.6 pCi/L
 

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Mathelo

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Did I post this in the wrong place? Doesn't look like anyone has even looked at this?
 

Reach4

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I am not a pro. This forum is the right place, but you have a lot to assimilate. So somebody prescribing a treatment solution without also selling you the equipment is unlikely.

For air, there are radon remediation systems. If you have an existing perimeter ground water drain, you can often DIY reduce the air radon by sealing the sump, and sucking on it with a radon fan. Exhaust outdoors. The official blessed systems are big bucks, with collection pipes getting installed under the basement floor.

Your water radon is less than what people propose as MCL. https://extension.psu.edu/reducing-radon-in-drinking-water

Regarding iron, a softener can handle your iron with some extra help. Regular treatment with Iron Out is one type of extra help. This can be added into the salt, and can also be used for periodic catch-up treatments.

You expect to buy your Clack softener from a local installer, I presume. They like to restrict sales to dealers.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index....izing-extra-attention-to-4-inch-casing.65845/ is my sanitizing write-up.

If you do put in an iron treatment system before the softener, that can be good. I think that many pros fail to allow for sufficient backwash of the media. Katalox Light media can reduce lead as well as iron. That is the one that often is insufficiently backwashed. If you do get a backwashing iron filter, I suggest an unpainted tank. That allows you to shine a light through to see the bed expansion.
 
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Mathelo

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I am not a pro. This forum is the right place, but you have a lot to assimilate. So somebody prescribing a treatment solution without also selling you the equipment is unlikely.

For air, there are radon remediation systems. If you have an existing perimeter ground water drain, you can often DIY reduce the air radon by sealing the sump, and sucking on it with a radon fan. Exhaust outdoors. The official blessed systems are big bucks, with collection pipes getting installed under the basement floor.

Your water radon is less than what people propose as MCL. https://extension.psu.edu/reducing-radon-in-drinking-water

Regarding iron, a softener can handle your iron with some extra help. Regular treatment with Iron Out is one type of extra help. This can be added into the salt, and can also be used for periodic catch-up treatments.

You expect to buy your Clack softener from a local installer, I presume. They like to restrict sales to dealers.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index....izing-extra-attention-to-4-inch-casing.65845/ is my sanitizing write-up.

If you do put in an iron treatment system before the softener, that can be good. I think that many pros fail to allow for sufficient backwash of the media. Katalox Light media can reduce lead as well as iron. That is the one that often is insufficiently backwashed. If you do get a backwashing iron filter, I suggest an unpainted tank. That allows you to shine a light through to see the bed expansion.
Thank you for your reply.

First, I'd like to do this myself but I may decide otherwise given all the requirements. Undecided at this point.

I was aware that Clack restricted distribution but I was under the impression that they are available with different brand names as OEM. I guess I need to do more research here but I'm not wedded to Clack. It just seemed to be favored based on what I've read online.

Do you think an iron treatment system before the softener would be worth it? I've read about using Iron Out to "clean" the softener of iron but this sounds more like a hack then an optimal solution. For me, it comes down to whether my iron levels are too high for a softener (1.08 PPM). I'll look into the Katalox.

Regarding my Radon problem and tests, I'm now questioning the veracity of this water test. I've had test performed years ago that ranged between 50,000 and 100,000 pCi/L. This is different from the current test by 1000 times. Also, my air level test of 8.4 pCi/L suggests something over 80,000 pCi/L based on that article you referred me too. Might be a scaling issue. So I need to dig into this a bit further or get another test performed. I've contacted SimpleLab about this.

And I should have noted that I already have a basement floor radon mitigation system in place. Has been operating for 30 plus years. I also have an inoperable radon removal tray style system that hasn't been working for years. Iron in the water just made a mess of it. Clearly the water needs to be treated before reaching the radon mitigation system.

Again, thanks for your input here.

Louis
 

Gsmith22

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did you search for what others have done? i have a number of posts regarding low ph, gross alpha, uranium, radon, and hardness remedation. here is a couple of old ones from me that i found:

https://terrylove.com/forums/index....h-gross-alpha-radium-uranium-and-radon.81450/

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/treatment-suggestions-for-uranium-needed.91929/

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/system-review-and-sourcing-5810.93806/


there are probably others but this is a good start
 

Mathelo

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Regarding my Radon problem and tests, I'm now questioning the veracity of this water test. I've had test performed years ago that ranged between 50,000 and 100,000 pCi/L. This is different from the current test by 1000 times. Also, my air level test of 8.4 pCi/L suggests something over 80,000 pCi/L based on that article you referred me too. Might be a scaling issue. So I need to dig into this a bit further or get another test performed. I've contacted SimpleLab about this.

Turns out I purchased the wrong test (Full Radiation Water Test) for Radon although still useful for knowing Gross Alpha/Beta activity levels, which are high at 37.9/33.6 pCi/L. I've now order a "Radon Water Test". Based on my Radon air test, I'll be surprised if this comes in below 50,000 pCi/L.
 

GReynolds929

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Addressing the high radon levels in your water is crucial for health reasons. Aeration or activated carbon filtration systems are commonly used for radon mitigation in water. Consult with a radon mitigation specialist to determine the best approach for your situation.
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