Proper Plumbing for Pressure Tank

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thedocia

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Hello,
We've got a 25 year old Pressure tank I'm looking to replace and upsize, however the way it's been installed seems to be different than what I'm seeing as 'typical' installation. It appears that the tank is installed not as a pass-thru with a check valve or any of that, but instead just installed directly onto the system. I can't locate a check valve anywhere in system ( at least in the house), so my assumption is that it's possible that the pump in the well is acting like a valve? Is it better to put in the new tank the same way, or should I change the system to incorporate a pass-through design and a check valve?

Other info: Apparently the well is shallow at 25 ft, however it's still a submursed pump. No problems with pressure or pump since we've owned the property.
I'm upgrading from 20 -> 40 gallon tank to cycle less often, and maybe smooth out pressure in house as our kids get bigger.
 

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Reach4

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Pass thru is not needed. Mine does not use pass-thru.

What is important is that there be a good low-resistance path between the input of pressure tank and where the pressure switch tees off.

In making your change, you probably want to add a drain valve that lets you blow sediment out occationally. Maybe annually, unless you get enough sediment to make more frequent flushes to be warranted.

Note your new tank will have a 1-1/4 input, rather than the 1 inch plumbing of your existing. tank.

I would consider the WX-250D. That used to be a premium over the WX-250, but it is the other way now. Those are 22 inches wide and 36 inches tall. https://www.pumpproducts.com/media/amasty/amfile/attach/9c2eb2c020bdaad14943b2012aef0799.pdf page 4 has dimensions on several models.
 
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thedocia

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Thanks for the info, I'm planning on repiping as much as possible from the ingress point of the house throughout the area ( adding new water heater, water softener, etc.

As far as I'm aware, the whole system hasn't ever been blown out, and only just recently did I install some filtration on the input. So my guess is that there is a ton of sediment in system right now, part of the reason for changing everything out. ( water heater is 25 years old as well, ugh )
 

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Precharged Pressure tank flush:
1. Connect a hose to the sediment drain valve, and run that to where you plan to drain the water. I suggest filtering the output through a cloth if you suspect the sediment may include sand.
2. Turn off the pump.
3. Open the drain valve, and let it drain until the water stops. It would be possibly interesting to watch the first water that comes out.
4. Close the valve, and turn the pump back on, and let pressure build.
5. Repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 as needed.

For WH flush, see https://terrylove.com/forums/index....o-flush-a-hot-water-heater.79444/#post-576623 post #7.
 

Valveman

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I'm upgrading from 20 -> 40 gallon tank to cycle less often, and maybe smooth out pressure in house as our kids get bigger.
I know this is going to sound strange to you but the pump would cycle less often and you would have strong constant pressure in the house instead of just "smoothing it out" a bit" by using a smaller, 4.5 gallon size tank and a Cycle Stop Valve.

The PK1A kit has the tank and everything you need to replace the tank if you go inline. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/pk1a-pside-kick

The PK1AM is made for the tank on the stub out end like you have it now. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/pk1am-pside-kick

 

thedocia

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I know this is going to sound strange to you but the pump would cycle less often and you would have strong constant pressure in the house instead of just "smoothing it out" a bit" by using a smaller, 4.5 gallon size tank and a Cycle Stop Valve.

The PK1A kit has the tank and everything you need to replace the tank if you go inline. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/pk1a-pside-kick

The PK1AM is made for the tank on the stub out end like you have it now. https://cyclestopvalves.com/pages/pk1am-pside-kick

I'm a little hesitant to change the system on that level, for a couple of reasons, first the pump is likely also original and i don't know the specs on it, 2nd there is a mix of cpvc, copper and polybutylene up and downstream from the pressure tank, and while I'm going to try and get it switched out as far as possible, not sure how all those various elements would handle things if I change the nominal pressure in the lines, even if they're in spec
 

thedocia

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I'm a little hesitant to change the system on that level, for a couple of reasons, first the pump is likely also original and i don't know the specs on it, 2nd there is a mix of cpvc, copper and polybutylene up and downstream from the pressure tank, and while I'm going to try and get it switched out as far as possible, not sure how all those various elements would handle things if I change the nominal pressure in the lines, even if they're in spec
Should also add I'm willing to look at the CSV I think I just need to be educated ha.

Is is OK to install on an unknown well pump, or more specifically, how would I best prepare to convert over to a csv and small tank with my scenario?
 

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To leave the tank dead ended like that you will need to install the CSV1A part of the PK1AM before the first tee in the line. The manifold with the little tank and switch can go where your tank is now. Only the pipe before the CSV1A will see any higher pressure. The pressure after the CSV1A will still be 40/60 as before. It would be nice to know a little about the pump, which would tell us how much pressure will be on the lines prior to the CSV. But it is rare for any pump to build more pressure than the pipe or CSV can take.

If there is a control box for the pump it will have the horsepower on the tag at the bottom. If there is no control box, that limits it to a 1.5HP or smaller. Clipping an AC amp meter around one of the hot wires would also tell you the horsepower, as 5 amps is 1/2HP, 7 is 3/4HP, and 9 is 1HP. With the amp reading and a bucket test, I can tell the size of the pump and how much pressure it will build. Wide open flow from a 10 GPM series pump would be about 17 GPM, which is what I think you have.

There is nothing the CSV can do about the damage from cycling that has already occurred, but it will stop the cycling and any further damage to the pump/motor. We can talk you through it if you want to call.
 
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