New bathroom in basement, how to vent?

Users who are viewing this thread

Philip6218

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Indiana
Good Morning everyone,

I've been reading up on venting for a while, found some useful info on basement bathrooms. The combination of venting the bathroom as well as the sewage pump has me unsure. I have added some pictures of the plumbing that is in place. Pictures are from a couple years ago, this is all under slab currently.

From left to right I have a shower, a toilet, and a lav. Then down the wall I have another lav for a wet bar. All of the drains lead into the ejector pit. Directly above the ejector pit there is a capped drain line and vent line. The drain line is tied into the house main sewer line, and the vent goes up through the house and out. The vent does have a wye that allows for two tie-ins.

The pit is pretty straight forward I think, it will vent through the dedicated vent line directly above it. Can all of the drains be vented off of one lav, which would tie into one of the vent connections above the pit?

Any help or advice would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Philip

Labeled image A.jpgLabeled image B.jpg
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,665
Reaction score
1,469
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Your lav, bar sink, and ejector basin will all need dry vents. It looks like the under slab plumbing is correct for the lav to wet vent the shower and WC. [The combined shower/lav drain should join the WC drain before the bar sink comes in, but if that's not the case, I'd say that's a fairly minor issue.]

So best practice would be run a vent for the bar sink up to the ceiling and over to your vent stub, and join all 3 vents to your vent stub.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Philip6218

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Indiana
Your lav, bar sink, and ejector basin will all need dry vents. It looks like the under slab plumbing is correct for the lav to wet vent the shower and WC. [The combined shower/lav drain should join the WC drain before the bar sink comes in, but if that's not the case, I'd say that's a fairly minor issue.]

So best practice would be run a vent for the bar sink up to the ceiling and over to your vent stub, and join all 3 vents to your vent stub.

Cheers, Wayne

Thanks Wayne, I appreciate the input!Vent layout.jpg

So if the underground stuff is correct for wet venting, does this seem correct for the above ground layout?
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,055
Reaction score
3,780
Points
113
Location
IL
Thanks Wayne, I appreciate the input!View attachment 80329

So if the underground stuff is correct for wet venting, does this seem correct for the above ground layout?
Ideal. Vent to roof is necessary for the pit. That may need to be 2 inch, but I am not sure. AAVs could work for sink and lav_shower under IPC, but since a real vent is available, that is superior.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,665
Reaction score
1,469
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
So if the underground stuff is correct for wet venting, does this seem correct for the above ground layout?
Yes on the venting and the lav drains.

It is possible that the horizontal vents should be kept above the horizontal drain into which the sewage ejector pumps. I'm not sure if that's really an issue or not, not super familiar with ejector pumps. It's a question of what happens in various failure modes and where things overflow first, you don't want them spilling into the horizontal vents. But I think I may be mistaken that it matters.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Philip6218

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Indiana
Ideal. Vent to roof is necessary for the pit. That may need to be 2 inch, but I am not sure. AAVs could work for sink and lav_shower under IPC, but since a real vent is available, that is superior.
Perfect, Thank you for the confirmation!
 

Philip6218

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Indiana
Yes on the venting and the lav drains.

It is possible that the horizontal vents should be kept above the horizontal drain into which the sewage ejector pumps. I'm not sure if that's really an issue or not, not super familiar with ejector pumps. It's a question of what happens in various failure modes and where things overflow first, you don't want them spilling into the horizontal vents. But I think I may be mistaken that it matters.

Cheers, Wayne
I don’t think it’s an issue but I could be wrong. This is my first time messing with a pump in a basement. I don’t think it would be an issue since the pump line and the vent line are isolated from each other. If the pump failed I guess the pit would fill and my basement fixtures wouldn’t flush/drain. I think I’m safe with the horizontal vents up near the ceiling, with any back up happening at my toilet or shower first.

I could be missing a scenario though…
Thanks!
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks