Late 80's sink faucet with failed plastic tubing - want to repair

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ICanFixThis

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My late 80's faucet uses some plastic (polybutylene?) tubing to connect the handles to the spout. One of the lines developed a crack. I would like to replace the line. One end uses a compression fitting, but the other connection is a mystery to me. I would like advice on how to disconnect the mystery end, and I would also like to know the manufacturer.
Here are pictures of view underneath, showing the mystery connection in the middle, followed by a top view, and then two views of the tubing ...
IMG_0035.JPG
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IMG_0032.JPG
IMG_0033.JPG
 

Marlinman

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Your faucet is Moen 4962. The original water lines were corrugated flex copper. Someone used a bit of ingenuity to replace them. The current PEX tubing should be able to replace the poly.
 

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Jeff H Young

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the pex look like push fit john quest type should be able to replace look at those type fittings they come apart easy . push in on the brass at the end of the tee and pull out the pex easy as pie
 

DirtyJerz

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Can’t tell from the pics the distance between the holes but if it’s 4 inches from the hot to the cold you have even more options in center-set faucets, can get stuff for 30 bucks.
 

Jeff H Young

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Its 45 years old got that patina thing going on, I dont think a new faucet is in the game plan . Just customers wishes to keep the original. its a widespread faucet BTW
 

ICanFixThis

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Thank you all for your help and advice. I am the owner, and prefer to retain the existing hardware (including the patina thing)! I succeeded in removing the Tee from the spout. Reading the marks on the tubing, I see it has PB2110, which I believe indicates this is polybutylene material. I intend to replace both pieces on this fixture, as well as the two pieces on the companion fixture too, before I get any new leaks. I'm considering two approaches:
1) Buy several feet of PEX tubing, and use the existing tee (with its three 34 year old O-rings) to mimic the original setup.
2) Purchase a new 3/8" compression tee, connecting it to the spout via the compression fitting, and using new 3/8" supply hoses to connect the tee to the handle.
3) Other clever idea from y'all?
My priority is reliability & service-ability over price
 

Jeff H Young

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Icanfixthis, Id just repair the one that leaks but if you want to replace that tee with a compression tee and a couple 3/8x 3/8 comp hoses. you have a "push fit" tee on there now you should be able to release the poly lines or replace tee with another push fit those poly lines arent too bad. remember there is no pressure on it especialy when its not running.
I like to see older stuff in use its boring to see all new stuff, From a labor standpoint its not often worth paying for the much repair on less expensive valves but as a DIY its worth it plus you like the faucets enjoy them.
 

John Gayewski

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I don't think compression is a good idea. Try to find sharkbite or push fit fittings that will work. Compression fittings on plastic tubing can blow off of not done specifically and the tubing held and properly supported. When you turn this valve on and off the tubes wiggle and the pressure is on and off suddenly. This isn't great with plastic and compression.
 

Jeff H Young

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I can fix this , option number 2 should be bulet proof . shark bites are even easier should last
 

ICanFixThis

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I went with option 2, and it went very well. Regarding compression fittings and plastic tubing - this is a good point. The only remaining compression fitting in use is on the junction of the Tee and the Spout. The other two "sides" of the Tee are connection to the valve with the new supply lines, so this is a threaded connection.
Thanks again for all your advice.
 
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