Can a DIY guy install/replace a water softener?

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Brucelieb

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I need a new water softener and think I can put a good one in myself.
(An education of sorts caused me to delete my original post.)
I am wondering if you all think this is something a handy DIY can accomplish.

There are only two pipes to connect, a manual to read and just plug it into the wall. Seems easy. I just have to find an appropriate Clack or Fleck system and a place to buy it?
After reading posts on this forum I see buying online is not a solution.
I figure 64,000 grains since I want to err to the over use side.

I have a neutralizer setup already and an old Hague maximizer 96 that I will remove.
Our well water is acidic and a little hard.
My pipes developed pin holes and the water left a blue stain in the tub so 25 years ago we had the original system installed. I serviced it myself. Poorly I imagine.

Any advice is welcome
 
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Vietjdmboi

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Absolutely can! I am not a licensed plumber but an engineer and handy man. I added the loop I needed and plumbed everything myself.
 

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bingow

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Fellow DIYer here. If you buy the resin tank and resin separate, it's much easier to handle the empty tank and position it accurately for later connections. But then, loading the resin without spilling is more difficult than you might think, including the cleanup. Try to find some loading tips, starting with the proper funnel. Also, give some thought to adding at least one pressure gage , a spigot to draw water for hardness testing, and a filter of some sort if needed.
 

MaxBlack

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...After reading posts on this forum I see buying online is not a solution...
As a handyman with no prior experience installing water softeners, at our ranch in Texas where water was 120gpg of hardness, I bought a system online from a place in Florida, and it arrived on a pallet in our cul-de-sac and thus the fun begain.

It didn't work properly, and after no small amount of troublehooting I determined that the valve was built wrong--had to take it apart and put it together again. The system worked OK after that but OMG it was not a fun thing to accomplish.

If I recall correctly we were using a bag or more of softener salt PER WEEK! We did shortly thereafter build a rainwater collection system, and abandoned the well and softener altogether. Twenty thousand bucks between the well and the softener, abandoned after maybe a year of use. It didn't kill me, and I think I might be stronger for the experience.
 

John Gayewski

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Yes you can install it yourself but there are more than two connections to make.
 

Smokeykurt

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If you can handle a relatively easy amount of plumbing, you can handle this. I've bought online before without issue (although I suppose folks mileage might vary). I'm a DIY guy (with medium plumbing experience) and it's probably been the easiest plumbing I've ever had to do.

Depending on your plumbing there are a lot of possible options. PVC, CPVC, Copper, PEX, Stainless. If you're not comfortable sweating a pipe, gluing a pipe etc., you could always use quick connects.

Get your water tested (if you haven't) so you can see the exact level of hardness you're dealing with. That will make configuring the system a heck of a lot easier.
 

Brucelieb

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You need the exact level of hardness? A water treatment company did a test and told me it was hard so I was just going to go from there. But why not. I 'll get it tested. Looking at the one I have , I only seeing two pipes to swap out.. and hoses but they just have clamps. The resin issue does freak me out. When you got yours was the resin loaded into it already? I guess it does get heavy but we are pretty strong around here. (Son, friends)

Thanks EVERYONE for the help... keep the advice coming.
 

Brucelieb

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As a handyman with no prior experience installing water softeners, at our ranch in Texas where water was 120gpg of hardness, I bought a system online from a place in Florida, and it arrived on a pallet in our cul-de-sac and thus the fun begain.

It didn't work properly, and after no small amount of troublehooting I determined that the valve was built wrong--had to take it apart and put it together again. The system worked OK after that but OMG it was not a fun thing to accomplish.

If I recall correctly we were using a bag or more of softener salt PER WEEK! We did shortly thereafter build a rainwater collection system, and abandoned the well and softener altogether. Twenty thousand bucks between the well and the softener, abandoned after maybe a year of use. It didn't kill me, and I think I might be stronger for the experience.
That sounds horrible. As I said the resin freaks me out. Funny how it goes easy for some and for others not. Assuming experience level is relatively equal. It is lot about luck and where you buy it from?
 

bingow

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You need specifics to size your system. Hardness, iron, manganese and other water components will be essential for you to get the best help from the pros here. A lab test is best. Also, you need to know gallons per day usage. You can estimate that, or install an inline meter (under $75 DIY). If your water is extremely hard, even half that of @MaxBlack , you may want a twin tank system. My well water hardness is currently 120gpg (it varies a lot), and yep I have twin 2ft3 tanks and currently use 40# salt a week, with regen every second or third day.
 
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