Bath sink help with vent

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Whale

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This bath sink and drain were here when I bought the house 40 years ago. It has been jery rigged over the years because of rust. I found a replacement sink, same style, hanging, and there is no cabinet under the sink.
The painted 11/2" galvanized drain pipe, draining vertically through the floor, will be replaced with PVC. The horizontal, painted, galvanized 11/2" pipe that goes into the wall is a dedicated vent that goes up to the roof. I am pretty sure if I unscrew the vent arm from the drain pipe it will fall apart.
  1. Without opening up the wall, how to plumb this correctly? Cut the galvanized vent pipe and then how to attach to that?
2. Is there a way to vent the washing machine, on the other side of this wall, into this, or new, under sink configuration by just cutting a hole in the wall for a pipe and connecting the two fixtures to one vent ?
 

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Reach4

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Can you add plumbing in the crawlspace or basement for this work?
 

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So I am thinking that the laundry and lavatory will have separate drain pipes through the floor. For the vents, maybe two separate AAVs.
 

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So I am thinking that the laundry and lavatory will have separate drain pipes through the floor. For the vents, maybe two separate AAVs.
I could do that, they have 2 different drains already. Could this work for the bath sink
 

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In the photo you one drain line into the floor, and one vent line.
So you have another drain line on the other side of the wall for the washing machine?

That should be 2 inch PVC on your new trap and drain upgrade for the washer standpipe. If you share a vent, you would normally want the vents to connect at least 6 inches above the flood level of both the standpipe and the sink.

If you want to make a hole bigger to pass 2 inch PVC, you can put a big-enough hole in a board. Then keeping the hole in position, put the hole saw into the hole in the board. That holds the hole saw in the right position as you turn it with the drill.
 

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In the photo you one drain line into the floor, and one vent line.
?So you have another drain line on the other side of the wall for the washing machine?

That should be 2 inch PVC on your new trap and drain upgrade for the washer standpipe. If you share a vent, you would normally want the vents to connect at least 6 inches above the flood level of both the standpipe and the sink.

If you want to make a hole bigger to pass 2 inch PVC, you can put a big-enough hole in a board. Then keeping the hole in position, put the hole saw into the hole in the board. That holds the hole saw in the right position as you turn it with the drill.
Yes, another drain line on other side of wall for washing machine and I can put two inch pvc on new trap and drain. Without opening the wall how could I get six inches above the flood level of the sink
 

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Without opening the wall how could I get six inches above the flood level of the sink
You could not. So putting an AAV on the laundry standpipe would make sense.

What you do for the lav will be a bit weird, since the vent should stay within 45 degrees of plumb. I would try to adapt to use that vent you have. Alternatively, the lav trap could have its own AAV.

index.php

The AAV can be 4 or more inches above the sanitary tee. I don't know the rules for standpipe height in CO. 30 inches is probably OK. Higher is less likely to suds over.

P3104.1 Connection
Individual branch and circuit vents shall connect to a vent stack, stack vent or extend to the open air.
Exception: Individual, branch and circuit vents shall be permitted to terminate at an air admittance valve in accordance with Section P3114.
 
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Whale

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In the photo you one drain line into the floor, and one vent line.
So you have another drain line on the other side of the wall for the washing machine?

That should be 2 inch PVC on your new trap and drain upgrade for the washer standpipe. If you share a vent, you would normally want the vents to connect at least 6 inches above the flood level of both the standpipe and the sink.

If you want to make a hole bigger to pass 2 inch PVC, you can put a big-enough hole in a board. Then keeping the hole in position, put the hole saw into the hole in the board. That holds the hole saw in the right position as you turn it with the drill.
what if I use an aav vent for the washing machine. Then could I use the vent in the wall, as shown in my picture?
 

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You could not. So putting an AAV on the laundry standpipe would make sense.

What you do for the lav will be a bit weird, since the vent should stay within 45 degrees of plumb. I would try to adapt to use that vent you have. Alternatively, the lav trap could have its own AAV.

index.php

The AAV can be 4 or more inches above the sanitary tee. I don't know the rules for standpipe height in CO. 30 inches is probably OK. Higher is less likely to suds over.

P3104.1 Connection
Individual branch and circuit vents shall connect to a vent stack, stack vent or extend to the open air.
Exception: Individual, branch and circuit vents shall be permitted to terminate at an air admittance valve in accordance with Section P3114.

You could not. So putting an AAV on the laundry standpipe would make sense.

What you do for the lav will be a bit weird, since the vent should stay within 45 degrees of plumb. I would try to adapt to use that vent you have. Alternatively, the lav trap could have its own AAV.

index.php

The AAV can be 4 or more inches above the sanitary tee. I don't know the rules for standpipe height in CO. 30 inches is probably OK. Higher is less likely to suds over.

P3104.1 Connection
Individual branch and circuit vents shall connect to a vent stack, stack vent or extend to the open air.
Exception: Individual, branch and circuit vents shall be permitted to terminate at an air admittance valve in accordance with Section P3114.
thanks for the info. You replied "the vent should stay within 45 degrees of plumb". Could you explain more detail about that? The vent in relationship to the trap, trap arm, drain?
 

Reach4

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The plumbing codes call for the real vent to stay vertical until 6 inches above the flood level of the served fixture.

Vertical, for this purpose is defined as within 45 degrees of plumb.

I think you are asking for more, such as if your picture shows meeting that (no), or if I would worry about the divergence from the rules if it were mine? (no) I am not a plumber.
 
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