Bath expansion/contraction noise after renovation

Users who are viewing this thread

Fcrombie

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Hi everyone,

I am seeking advice, can you let me know if the below way of fitting the bath is safe/acceptable and what the fitter should/could be doing to rectify the issues that I am having? Also, should I be using the bath in the meantime? Details are below.

I recently (a week ago) had my bath replaced and when the bath empties there is a strange popping noise in the walls. On researching I have concluded that the issue is expansion/contraction of the bath probably due to insufficient support either from a weak frame or from the base having gaps.
-The previous bath was fitted on a mortar bed, this bath was deeper so he drilled down the mortar bed and filled with foam.
-He dismantled the old frame and built a new one.
-When the foam was setting he left water in the bath overnight but on seeking advice i think he might have left the bath too full thus contracting the foam too much..

The fitter has suggested that the best solution would be to come back and fill with more foam. But to access the bath from the kitchen rather than from the newly tiled panel. Will a couple of holes from the kitchen (only one side of the bath) be enough to make sure the underbath is filled properly.

I am about to send a message to the fitter raising my concerns about the above and also making the following proposal.

-Arrange a time to add more foam.

-If this does not fix the problem, I think we need to open it up and maybe get a second opinion.

I welcome any comments, I want to make sure before going back to the fitter that I am addressing everything I need to.

Thanks
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
9,368
Reaction score
2,367
Points
113
Location
92346
it might work, might not I dont recomend tearing everythinbg out and doing it right but thats one option Id try anything short of that
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
9,368
Reaction score
2,367
Points
113
Location
92346
more than one way to do it , some call for mortar somer call for ledger boards (I like both) but some dont mention a ledger some I see are recomending silicone on a ledger board and underneath on floor. Kohler castr iron calls for metal shims under feet Which I do plus I use a ledger and mortar. you really need to think it through and see best way normaly I say manufacture but I change it up a bit the ledger board is meant to give slight support not to carry the tub and water and 500 pounds of occupants.
foam I think is not to provide full support but help some slight creaking walking around in the tub.
 

Julio Agustin

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
LA
Hi there,

It sounds like you're experiencing some concerning issues with your newly replaced bath, and it's important to address them promptly to ensure safety and longevity of the installation.

Firstly, the strange popping noise you hear when the bath empties could indeed be related to inadequate support or improper installation of the new bath. The use of foam to fill gaps left by drilling into the mortar bed can be a temporary solution, but it seems like more support is needed to prevent the bath from shifting or making noises due to expansion and contraction.

The proposed solution by your fitter to add more foam from access points in the kitchen could help provide additional support, but it's crucial to ensure that the underbath is filled properly and evenly to avoid any further issues.

Before proceeding with additional foam, I recommend discussing your concerns with the fitter and proposing the following:

  1. Arrange a time for the fitter to come back and address the issue by adding more foam under the bath.
  2. Request that the fitter assesses the situation thoroughly, potentially accessing the bath from the kitchen to ensure proper support is provided.
  3. Clearly communicate that if the popping noise persists after this adjustment, further investigation may be necessary, possibly involving opening up the area for a more comprehensive inspection.
In addition, considering a second opinion from another experienced contractor like Evolve Contractors could provide valuable insights and assurance that the issue is resolved correctly.

It's essential to prioritize safety and quality in bathroom installations, and I hope these steps help you address the concerns effectively with your fitter. Best of luck, and I hope your bath installation is rectified soon!

Feel free to reach out for professional advice or assistance with your renovation needs.

Best regards.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks