What parts do I need to replace this toilet cut off valve with a similar ball type 90 turn valve?

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Lee_Leses

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What parts do I need to replace this toilet cut off valve with a similar ball type 90 turn valve?

With the new toilet I want to go with a 90 turn "ball" shut off valve.

Maybe the "Brasscraft" brand?

I'm not 100% sure what I'm looking at here? Is this a chrome sleeve over soldered in 1/2" copper, or what is it please?

A link or a part number or even the correct description of what I need would be great! Thank you everyone!

valve.jpg
 
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Tuttles Revenge

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You're going to need to get behind / under the floor where that soldered on valve chrome bit ends. The chrome bit is a soldered on sleeve over copper pipe. So you will need to extend the copper tube up through the floor to replace the existing valve.

It may be possible to unsweat the existing valve but since I've never actually touched one of those valves before I don't know exactly

Brasscraft and many other manufactures make 1/4turn 5/8th compression x 3/8 compression straight stops.
 

Breplum

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I do so love quarter turn angle stops but in your case, if the valve is soldered on, grab a new multi-turn conventional Brasscraft or brand that matches what you have, and just replace the stem.
Even cheaper rehab, you could pull the valve, grease it and replace the little washer.
 

Jadnashua

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Pull up the escutcheon and see if you can view the copper pipe coming up through the floor. If you can, depending on how much copper might be visible, you might be lucky and just cut it off and still have enough of a stub to attach a new valve after cleaning the pipe up. BUt, you'll probably have to remove the valve attached to that sleeve. You need to get all of the water out of the line, so you'd need to shut the main line off and drain things, or you'll never get it hot enough to melt the solder.

Or, try to rebuild the valve as mentioned above. You can use rigid tubing from the new valve, or use a hose to the toilet.
 

Reach4

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Lift that chrome escutcheon from floor a couple inches.
Then how about a sharp photo showing the area that was at the floor up to the bottom half of the valve. Looking for a couple things.

Would you be looking to keep a 3/8 OD chrome tube up to the toilet, or would you be looking to use an easier flex coupling?

But that fixing the old valve does sound attractive.
 

Lee_Leses

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Lift that chrome escutcheon from floor a couple inches.
Then how about a sharp photo showing the area that was at the floor up to the bottom half of the valve. Looking for a couple things.

Would you be looking to keep a 3/8 OD chrome tube up to the toilet, or would you be looking to use an easier flex coupling?

But that fixing the old valve does sound attractive.

Thank you everyone! The copper for this valve drops two floors and there's a ball valve in the basement just for this toilet line. It would just be easier to give the bowl a good cleaning if I could easily turn off the water upstairs so the bowl would be dry to clean. This toilet was installed roughly 2001, and the valve in the picture will not turn -- I HATE that! I'll try to get a good picture of under that escutcheon. Servicing that valve is starting to look real good. I want to use a flexible supply line on the new toilet. It was also suggested possibly leaving that valve there and adding a second new valve! But who wants to look at that! :)
 

Reach4

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I like those metal lines, but they are more work. Let's hope repairing that valve is easy enough.

If not, and that is a chromed pipe that is 5/8 inch OD, you alternatively saw off that pipe near the valve, dress the cut end, and put on a new compression valve. I was also wondering if that could be a chrome sleeve over a copper pipe.
 

Jadnashua

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Those valves are actually a huge coupler...the copper pipe fits inside and is soldered to the valve. So, a standard compression valve will not fit over it. https://www.homedepot.com/p/BrassCr...MERCH=REC-_-searchViewed-_-NA-_-202047063-_-N

My guess is that after you pull up the bell, you'll see the copper feed line.

The solid tubing from the valve has some advantages when low if it can be knocked with a broom or mop when cleaning the floor...it's more resilient than a hose. But, you may need tubing bender tool(s) to make it fit, and you have to cut it to length, which takes more time and skill, but not all that much more.
 

Lee_Leses

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Reach4, it’s interesting how mostly everything has pros and cons! I see how the metal line can be more durable in some situations! On the other hand, the reason that I don’t like the metal lines is one time I saw it on a two piece toilet where someone sat down and the tank moved just enough to start a leak where there was not a leak before. In that case the toilet was installed with no leaks for like 5 years before the tank moved a tiny bit and started the leak! The flexible line of course can move with the tank a little bit . I recently heard a story also of someone’s cat that bit through their flexible supply toilet line causing a massive leak if you can believe that! So based jadnashua's post (thank you!) I guess what I probably would like to have is this if I can get it.


I’m not sure why it’s so expensive! I feel incredibly foolish that I didn’t think to pull the escutcheon up, which clearly shows what we’re dealing with. Am I right that the flexible supply line would bolt up correctly to the link that I just posted? I believe you just don’t use the compression fitting ring and it gets a washer instead, or something like that?
 

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Lee_Leses

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Reach4

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I’m not sure why it’s so expensive!
Not that expensive, and it is a ball valve.

To unsolder that, I think you would want to somehow drain the water.

Am I right that the flexible supply line would bolt up correctly to the link that I just posted? I believe you just don’t use the compression fitting ring and it gets a washer instead, or something like that?
Yes. You would discard the ferrule and the nut. No washer, because the supply line will have its own seal that presses onto the top of the valve. A bit of silicone grease can help rubber seals and some very light grease on the threads will reduce the torque needed to tighten to a given tightness.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Dahl-51...-Finishing-Valve-w-2-1-2-Ext-Lead-Free-Chrome is a similar valve but connects to copper with compression rather than solder.

However I think soldering on a replacement, if you cannot repair has the advantage of not needing to cut back the copper or to clean all of the residual solder off.
 
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Tuttles Revenge

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To get the water out, Since its a straight valve, you can evacuate the water with a small diameter straw and suck the water out. Or place your thumb over to hold siphon..
 

Reach4

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Take a windex spray bottle (or any spray bottle) and dip the long tube into the pipe after it's cut. Then simply spray the water out. That's a free tip for you.
Nice. So you would saw or cutoff the chrome , and then apply your pumping. Maybe cut 1 inch above the bottom of the chrome?

I was thinking to turn off the water to the house, and open a faucet on a lower floor.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/153476792544 would be the multi-turn version that you might use for parts.
 
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Lee_Leses

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Thanks a million guys!

Reach4 that SupplyHouse ROCKS! They had stock on the one I showed in the link in their Nevada warehouse, with overnight shipping available! WOW!
 

Lee_Leses

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My bad! As the name suggests, these are made of brass -- I'm surprised it's not more than $28 dollars!

Also gold stars -- MADE IN USA!
 

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