Pressure loss

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Shad

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I live on top of a hill and my water pump is at the lower street level by the city water line. When we use our water the pressure will drop and the water will stop running for a minute until the pump turns on. Once the pump turns on we have full water pressure. How can I get the pump to start before we lose pressure?

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LLigetfa

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Assuming there is a captive air pressure tank and pressure switch, try raising the cut-in pressure on the pressure switch or reduce the air precharge.
 

EnglishPlumber

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Assuming there is a captive air pressure tank and pressure switch, try raising the cut-in pressure on the pressure switch or reduce the air precharge.
this is some solid advice, ideally get a local plumber out to check it as it will save you hours of trying to troubleshoot yourself.
 

LLigetfa

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Prepping for spam.
I doubt it.

The problem is that the precharge pressure is likely too high (or inversely the pressure switch kick-in too low) so the tank is completely empty before the pump turns on resulting in an interruption in flow.

The pressure switch setting likely drifted over time or there is a small leak in the tank diaphragm causing water to cross over to the air side increasing the air pressure. A small leak can be one-way, so as to jack up the precharge.
 

Valveman

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If the water is off for a minute or so the air pressure in the tank is not the problem. Most likely the overload in the motor is tripping, which they do before the pump is completely dead from cycling on and off too much.
 

Fitter30

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First replace gauge. That time delay is easy to diagnose. Pull cover off pressure switch. Turn water on pressure drops note the switch closer and pressure. Does it start gaining pressure when pump starts or stays even. Does it gain ? Shut water off does it take a minute or stays running gaining pressure steadily?
 

Shad

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Assuming there is a captive air pressure tank and pressure switch, try raising the cut-in pressure on the pressure switch or reduce the air precharge.
There is no pressure tank that I can see and the pressure switch is down by the pump. I am assuming the head pressure from the hill causes the delay in the switch knowing the pressure drop. Will look at the switch today to see if I can turn it up.
 

Shad

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Picture please

Top of the hill. The pump box is in the bottom corner of the driveway. Don’t know why it rotated the pic sideway.

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F68E6A67-4929-44CF-9CD0-A75EE4B833B4.jpeg

close up of the pump box.

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The boost pump

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Valveman

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"City Pressure Booster Pump" LOL! I wish I had a multi-million dollar marketing division who could make people think it is possible to get a silk purse from a sow's ear. All I have is a pump control that has been working flawlessly for over 30 years, doesn't cost very much, and lasts a long, long time. It is hard to get rich selling something like that. So, my marketing consist of hundreds and hundreds of 5 star reviews from happy customers. The high dollar marketing divisions can make things sound really attractive. "Soft starts, variable speed, constant pressure, saves energy, no pressure tank needed, etc., etc." You end up paying way more for one of those "fancy devices", having lots of problems, and having to replace the pump all too often, which is the main goal of the manufacturer.

The "mushroom" looking device is a pressure reducing valve, which is what is really controlling the pressure to the house, because the fancy variable speed and electronics are not doing the job. When you see one of those you know the pump is not capable of maintaining a constant pressure even though that is what is advertised.

Without a pressure tank there is no water until the pump comes on. I am sure the pump has a soft start, which means it takes a short time for it to get up to speed. When you open a tap the pressure drops and triggers the pump to start. But by the time it gets up to speed you have been out of water for several seconds. These negative/positive pressures are not only annoying, but very hard on water lines and equipment.

A regular jet pump with a PK1A to control it is much less expensive, just as efficient, and will last many times longer. But you won't see any multi-million dollar ad campaigns for the CSV, as it costs so little and last so long you will need to just do a little research to understand it it the best pump control available.

In the mean time, call F&W, tell them about the problem. Make them make it right or give you a refund. It is funny but pump manufacturers really like having problems, because that means you are going to need to purchase another pump soon.

You purchase a regular jet pump with a PK1A and I don't expect to hear from you for at least 30 years.

Jet pump and PK1A.jpeg
 

EnglishPlumber

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You do realize that this is a forum that helps people do their own repairs, right?
You want them to just give up?
no but if they are not able to do it themselves then there is no point wasting time and they should get someone qualified to get the job done
 

Terry

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no but if they are not able to do it themselves then there is no point wasting time and they should get someone qualified to get the job done
English Plumber, in North America we have forums where we share information for those brave enough to try new things. Many our our ancestors hopped aboard boats and went to the "New World" as they were tired of being told what their place was, and just do what has always been done. The ones that wanted the opportunity of try their new ideas, came here.
We are people that think we are smart, we can learn, and we are tough. Can you imagine what it would have been like on the Mayflower and how long that took to cross the ocean? Right away we had to learn new ways of doing things. We made friends with groups of people, not knowing much about their customs and found ways of getting along. In the America's, we are tough people. I do understand though, that the English that were afraid of the new world, don't do much.

What we have here in the US.
IBM
Oracle
Apple
Alphabet (Google)
Boeing
Lockheed
Microsoft
Amazon
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Meta (Facebook)
 
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Valveman

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Educating themselves on how a their pump system works is never a waste of time. Most people are here asking questions because they have had and paid for several "professionals" to fix the problem, yet the problem persist. With a little education they realize many "professionals" are not "qualified" to do the job. Because of this forum there are many homeowners who are more qualified than the professionals they have available. Contractors only have themselves to blame for not becoming educated on how pumps work, and it is even worse when they act like they know and don't. Many systems like this are installed by a contractor at an exorbitant price, yet the homeowner has to figure out why it isn't working and make the changes needed to have an adequate water supply. A pump installer who knows what he is doing is worth his weight in gold, but they are few and far between.
 

Shad

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Thanks everyone for you time and answers. I suspected that it was the pump, but wanted to make sure.
 

Shad

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no but if they are not able to do it themselves then there is no point wasting time and they should get someone qualified to get the job done
I more the capable of doing this myself. It is never a waste of time trying something new. If you fail or succeed you still learn something. I would hate to be the guy that always has to call someone because I am afraid to try. If they can do it I can do it.
 
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