Miltiple pressure tanks?

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Awestaway

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Hi everyone, sorry for the long explanation, but trying to be clear in explaining. I am in the process of renovating and reconfiguring some plumbing in my house. Currently it has 2 pressure tanks, a larger (not sure size) fiberglass one, where the pressure switch is, in the basement where the well comes in, and a 2nd tank, on the 3rd floor. The second tank is built into a cabinet and virtually impossible to access. I believe this tank was originally where the pressure switch was, before a prior reconfiguration in 1994.

The house has essentially 2 separate everything, from the original build, and a large addition in the 90's. Yep, 2 hot water heaters, even 2 boilers, but only 1 well. The cold water supplies are seperated juust after the pressure tank in the basement, that's where the plumbing gets interesting. The original side is plumbed in circles, must be 40 feet of extra pipe in the system, that part i can fix.

The newer side has the 3rd floor tank, connected to a standard tank T in a 3/4 inch copper line that then goes on to feed the second water heater, in the basement, as well as 2 bathrooms. I need to move the 3/4 line that feeds that pressure tank, and am wondering if i need it, and if i were to leave it, can i make it so its at the end of a run, about 6 feet from a Tee rather than the way its configured now?
As its currently configured, we have great water pressure throughout the house, but we are rmodeling due to a water issue, and tanks in cabinets that aren't accessible on the 3rd floor make me nervous. I would like to be able to relocate this tank if its needed later, but that can't be part of this project right now.
 

Valveman

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It is not good to have multiple pressure tanks in different locations. They will not fill at the same time and cause the pump to cycle on again to finish filling the second tank. Remove the second tank and make sure the pressure switch is with the first tank. If one tank is not enough and causes the pump to cycle too much, adding another tank in the same location will help. But adding a Cycle Stop Valve instead of another tank will give you much stronger constant pressure in the house, eliminate many more cycles than any number of pressure tanks could achieve, and make the pump and everything in the system last longer as well. If you are "upgrading" your water system, especially if you want better pressure, a CSV is the best way to do that.

 

Awestaway

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Thanks @Valveman ! I was really hoping to just remove every aspect of that second tank from my system for now, really simplifies so much. To do that. Thanks for the quick reply!
 
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