Joining Copper to PVC

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We recently had our 1/2" copper line vandalized as it runs about 15' against our building, ground level.
This copper line comes out of the main supply line and runs over to a buried irrigation valve. I am assuming they initially used copper as it is outside, this portion is not buried, it does not get hit with UV rays all day as it is in the shade, but when they installed it I am sure it made sense to use copper at that time.
I am concerned about simply sweating in a brand-new copper line there to only have it vandalized again. (BTW, they twisted it all up, tried to break it off, bent it, some portions were bent and broken off and some portions were not taken. They did not seem to have tools so it was brute force.)
When we go to fix this, we can still tie into uncompromised 1/2" copper line near the main, but for the portion that was vandalized, are there some alternative materials I could use instead to span that straight stretch of about 15' above ground pipe? Schedule 80 was something I began to research. I am seeing there are 3 or 4 reasonable ways to connect PVC to Copper but I need some more direction and advice as to specifically using an "Alternative material" to copper and "how" to join the two. I was trying to find a sharkbite coupling, I also see there is a product called Metalhead, then one plumber gave an example of a compression fitting where he threaded male PVC, with sealant tape into a female brass compression fitting. I am just beginning on this project so I am open to any suggestions. Thanks so much!
 

wwhitney

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How about sticking with copper and covering it up with a plastic channel? Similar to what is used for HVAC line sets, although I imagine you'd want something of smaller cross section.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Jeff H Young

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Galvanized, Rugged as all hell ! or I suppose shove pvc through some conduit , might not be legal technicaly or it might be legal but Id be comfortable with the plastic inside a length of conduit.
 
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Galvanized, Rugged as all hell ! or I suppose shove pvc through some conduit , might not be legal technicaly or it might be legal but Id be comfortable with the plastic inside a length of conduit.
I never did consider Galvined, only because our entire underground irrigation system is galvanized and is all rotting and breaking so I have a hate hate relationship with it. But in this case, that is not a bad idea. So I need like a half-foot brass nipple to join steel an copper right? Or longer? I have some black spray for steel I could even paint it so it blends in. OK I am so glad I asked. Never would have ever considered galvanized. Everyone knows how much I hate galvanized steel so when they hear this from me, going to be comical. But it is a perfect fit for this. Thanks again.
 

Jeff H Young

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If you paint the pvc its probebly ok I dont like it though. The Galvinised isnt my top pick for rust but certainly withstands a beating
 

Reach4

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What is your problem with the SharkBite converter?

By vandalized, do you mean just damaged, or did they try to steal copper? Potential thieves are a real downside of copper.
 
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What is your problem with the SharkBite converter?

By vandalized, do you mean just damaged, or did they try to steal copper? Potential thieves are a real downside of copper.
I am not as familiar with the sharkbite coupling and I needed some clarification that it works with schedule 80. Maybe shoot me a link to one. The galvanized steel will rust indeed, so I have some doubts creeping in now. They vandalized this section of pipe and then stole pipe from another neighbor. The section they ended up stealing was 1/2" copper down the way, it was just under 6 feet of old 1/2" copper. They did a ton of damage to the fittings and pipe as they twisted and bent them all up. They must have not had tools as they just bent it back and forth until it weakened and snapped off. It was amateur hour for sure. What can you get for 6 feet of 25-year-old used 1/2" copper? I think they were stealing it to use for their own needs and not to sell it. They did turn all the water off first before they destroyed everything, so they were not totally high I suppose.
 

Reach4

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I would add SIDR polyethelene pipe to my consideration.

In plastic pipe, there is PVC and CPVC. PVC is larger inside -- same size as galvanized. CPVC is the same OD as copper, but smaller ID.

Most Sharkbite fit push connectors/adapters fit onto copper, CPVC or PEX. They do make special transition units to transition between PVC and one of the others.
https://www.sharkbite.com/us/en/bra...lings/push-to-connect-pvc-transition-coupling Says "the white collar end is compatible with schedule 40, 80 and 120 PVC pipe"

Plastic pipe has the advantage of not being attractive to steal.

Schedule 80 has the same OD as schedule 40, but it is thicker.

Irrigation supply does not often use 1/2 inch pipe. So you could consider upping that section to 3/4, especially if you go with PEX or CPVC.
 

Jeff H Young

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Such a shame the destruction over 2 dollars of scrap.
We have been having street lamp lighting underground wiring ripped out lately in Anahiem Im sure they arent only ones
 
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So you could consider upping that section to 3/4, especially if you go with PEX or CPVC.
Thank so much, so dumb question, Can I run PEX outside along the ground and then bury it? I always thought it was not great with UV, and just kinda more for in the walls type deal? I also only consider CPVC if I am dealing with Hot water? Is that correct? So if I going to run plastic, I only considered Schedule 80. Is PEX and CPVX something I should consider?
I kinda narrowed it down to tough Galvanized steel, or schedule 80 as the two options for this specific application. But you have brought up PEX and CPVC to consider. You think that is ok to run outside, on asphalt next to the building, cold water, at ground level, and then it dips underground?
 

Reach4

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PEX should be protected from UV and freezing, although it survives freezing better than other plastic.

Regarding PVC vs CPVC for outside use. I know that people say that CPVC tends to get brittle with age. I don't hear people say that about PVC, but I guess there is not a lot of use of PVC with hot water. So I don't have an opinion to offer, but the size difference is clear.
 

WorthFlorida

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For irrigation only, use PVC. It's low cost, easy to work with and Sharkbite does make a copper to pvc fittings. Because it's near the ground, use Schedule 40 for impact protection.
 
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For irrigation only, use PVC. It's low cost, easy to work with and Sharkbite does make a copper to pvc fittings. Because it's near the ground, use Schedule 40 for impact protection.
We were researching impact protection. Schedule 80 was noted as more durable and thicker. However, you are suggesting Schedule 40 instead of 80? Curious if you could explain why you would go with 40 over 80. Thanks
 

WorthFlorida

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We were researching impact protection. Schedule 80 was noted as more durable and thicker. However, you are suggesting Schedule 40 instead of 80? Curious if you could explain why you would go with 40 over 80. Thanks
Schedule 80 is very thick with a smaller inside diameter. Unless the pipe can be run over or subject to impacts like a vehicle, schedule 80 would be needed. It is also hard to find schedule 80. The couplings are usually sch 40.
 

Reach4

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Not plumbing rated, but PVC electrical conduit is schedule 80. I think it may have more plasticizers, and it does have UV inhibitors.
 
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