Is there a sticky? Newbie questions

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latexyankee

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Still learning after a few days..

How can I tell the cubic ft of the resin in any softener? Most don't state if they are 1cft/q.5/2.0cft etc..Is this apparent with the size of tank?

Apparently this is the most important factor regarding efficiency, sizing and regeneration. Still learning on how the formula works between water hardness, cubic ft of resin, and salt use for regeneration.

Another question is % of crosslinked resin. Where is this stated for any given softener? People with city/municpal (not well) have been advised to go with 10% crosslinked resin on these boards. Is there a way to tell when a softener contains 10%? I've seen mentions of companies stating 8 but really providing 6 etc...how can I get "proof"?

I'm not planning to stay at this house very long, likely 5 years. Do people take these with them or sell the house with softener? Should I buy whirlpool cabinet to get by here for 5 years and invest in something better when I move into my "Im going to die here" home? Not trying to be cheap, but I dont want to pay for something the next homeowner gets to enjoy.

thanks! Im an idiot when it comes to plumbing and home improvement, you guys are so nice here!
 

Reach4

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Yes, apparent from the size of the tank. For example, 10x54 inch tank is generally 1.5 cuft. 12x52 is 2 cuft. 9x48 would be 1 cuft. This is for a normal softener.

Formula... not as simple as it first says. First, if they say 48000 grains of capacity, only take that as code that there is 1.5 cuft of resin. Figure actual capacity is about 2/3 of that number.

If they don't state the cross linked number, assume it is not what you want with city water. An exception might be if you were only interested in 5 years. As to proof, I don't know; you are relying on the seller to be reputable. There is usually a price adder for the 10% option.

Cabinet softener is not a bad idea for 5 years and gone. People seldom take the softener with them. Those units are generally replaced rather than repaired.

In planning, you need to know the hardness. If this is city water, the water department will know, even if they don't publish. If they publish, they usually quote the average hardness. You would like to know the actual hardness. Give them a call. They usually like to talk about their product.
 

latexyankee

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Hey thanks I'm going to buy a test kit today and test the hardness myself.

So cabinet softener may be in play for 5 years and gone. The ONE issue is if we get "stuck" here by the housing market tanking. I guess one could reevaluate at that time. In the whirlpool cabinet style I assume those are always 8% resin? Its harder to find stats on them but I did find a spec sheet. What's your opinion on the 8% vs 10% for city water? the big box offerings that info doesn't seem to be available.

I need to test the water first before even thinking about anything as it may be so hard that a cabinet just wont work well enough. I can tell you its pretty hard, central ohio, on the map were dark red. Our faucets have extreme build up in like a month and it just feels terrible on the skin. Off to the store now to grab a test kit.
 

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Reach4

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Hach 5-B is the normally recommended test. Test strips are not as good.

If the maker/seller don't specify, I would not know what to guess.
 

latexyankee

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Those kits are 6 weeks out. I guess the strips will give me a general idea and I can just assume it's worse than the strip provides? Looks like I'm likely going with fleck 5600xt 1.5 cut, 10% resin if I don't go the cabinet route.

Can you tell me what problems may arise not having the EXACT hardness measurement and just a good ballpark figure? Like say 40-50 instead of a direct 55?

Not sure I want to wait so long, have other projects lingering.
 

Reach4

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Those kits are 6 weeks out. I guess the strips will give me a general idea and I can just assume it's worse than the strip provides? Looks like I'm likely going with fleck 5600xt 1.5 cut, 10% resin if I don't go the cabinet route.

Can you tell me what problems may arise not having the EXACT hardness measurement and just a good ballpark figure? Like say 40-50 instead of a direct 55?

Not sure I want to wait so long, have other projects lingering.
Why not ask the water department?

Anyway, the reading will make sure that the softener size is appropriate. A softener appropriate to 4 people and 20 grains per gallon (GPG) water would probably not be appropriate for 60 GPM water.

That said, 1.5 cuft is appropriate to many applications, and it has a nice form factor.

How many people are normally using the soft water? Typically figure 60 gallons per day per person.

Is there an indication on your water department's web page?
 

latexyankee

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I found a online store with the Hach test in stock.

I'm still scratching my head with the whole GPG/PPM and then flow. Ive read the guide from aquatell and while it is informative it still doesn't give me a formula to use. Ive seen the efficiency chart posted here and I half understand it.

We have 3.5 persons here, one of us is here half the week. So I round up to 4. I'm going to read the guide again but it seems to focus on cubic feet and nothing else like usage or persons when it comes to capacity. I'm sure I'm overcomplicating things but with anything new the acronyms run together it gets overwhelming etc...

The efficiency part is important but with salt being so inexpensive does it matter THAT much if your spending $6-$12 per month on salt VS a few hundered difference up front? Seems like it would take years to even break even.

Edit- No my provider doesnt post anything online, I can call them but I guess the test i better than that, never know where theyre pulling water from

Thanks for all the replies friend
 
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Reach4

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1 GPG is 17.1 mg/l or 17.1 ppm calcium hardness equivalent.

Some water providers take more river water at times (low hardness) and well water at times (higher hardness).
 
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