Hybrid DHW pros and cons

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Sewer Rat

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It is time to replace my propane fired, indirect hot water maker and I'm seriously considering installing a hybrid heat pump hot water heater. Looking at efficiency specs and the chance to get partially away from propane's expense and price swings, it seems like a hybrid heat pump/electric hot water heater is a no-brainer to me. However, I've often found that my "no-brainers" really just meant that I didn't use mine. Does anybody have experience, good or bad, with the hybrid heaters? More to the point, are the Rheem heaters sold at Homely Depot a good quality heater? I've bought a fair amount of plumbing stuff from Supply House, and don't mind getting an A.O. Smith or Bradford White (I've heard those are both good) from them, but HD is convenient and I get a 10% military break there.

Some basic background:
The heater will be installed in a mostly open basement with well over the recommended 1000 cubic feet to pull heat from.
The basement is heated with in-floor radiant heat and is kept at 70 degrees because of the bar/theater in the basement. I don't like getting chilly sipping scotch and watching movies:)
I have a 240V/30A circuit available.

Any advise is greatly appreciated!
 

WorthFlorida

New Chemotherapy, Enhertu. Started June 20, 2024
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Pros;
It actually cools the space it is in.
It will be less costly per month than propane.
Look up your utility company for any rebates. Florida is $600 but going from propane to hybrid may not apply but the electric company may offer a smaller rebate by going hybrid so not to install a standard WH

Cons;
If the heat pump fails, the entire tank needs to be replaced. May be someday, HVAC tech can fix the heat pump system.
Electronic controls can fail, then no hot water until a replacement is in hand.
You need to use a condensation pump unless you have a drain nearby.

Last Oct I replaced my electric WH (AO Smith Pro from Ferguson Supply) and decided not to go with a hybrid because of the complexity. Standard electric water heater only have four part to fail. 2 thermostats, two heating element. All off the shelf parts used by everyone. AO Smith makes good quality.

I just started chemo and I'm in stage 4, age 73. I did not want the complexity with a failure for the wife to deal with. Same reason not to add solar panels. Twenty years ago it be a different story.
 

Sewer Rat

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Pros;
It actually cools the space it is in.
It will be less costly per month than propane.
Look up your utility company for any rebates. Florida is $600 but going from propane to hybrid may not apply but the electric company may offer a smaller rebate by going hybrid so not to install a standard WH

Cons;
If the heat pump fails, the entire tank needs to be replaced. May be someday, HVAC tech can fix the heat pump system.
Electronic controls can fail, then no hot water until a replacement is in hand.
You need to use a condensation pump unless you have a drain nearby.

Last Oct I replaced my electric WH (AO Smith Pro from Ferguson Supply) and decided not to go with a hybrid because of the complexity. Standard electric water heater only have four part to fail. 2 thermostats, two heating element. All off the shelf parts used by everyone. AO Smith makes good quality.

I just started chemo and I'm in stage 4, age 73. I did not want the complexity with a failure for the wife to deal with. Same reason not to add solar panels. Twenty years ago it be a different story.
Sorry to hear about the cancer, but hang in there. My wife finished chemo a few years ago, and has been doing ok since then.

I had considered that the heat pump will cool the area it's in, but suspect that it won't be much more noticeable than the kitchen getting warmer from the "heat pump" in the fridge. I hadn't thought about the condensate, but do have a drain available; thanks for the pointer! As for longevity, I'm hoping that the compressor used will be at least as good as those used in a good refrigerator, but the electronics are a likely failure point. I'm a retired electronics tech who no longer likes working on electronic stuff, but I can live with it if I have to.

Thanks for the input, and keep fighting that effing cancer!
 

Reach4

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Besides cooling, it is dehumidifying. It has a drain line.
 
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