Hose spigot leak in concrete slab!

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Shannyshields

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Hello all,
I'm new to this so please bare with me. My rental property in Sparks NV. Has a front water spigot that has not been used in years. We are looking to sell the house soon and want to fix it up. A couple years ago, I went to use the front hose and no water came out. I was in a hurry and low on money, so we just never used it again and just used a hose from the backyard spout. I recently had a plumber take a look and once he turned the spout on with the hose connected, it sprayed water out of the concrete slab. He informed me that the spout most likely had a crack and I would have to go through the flooring inside the house. We noticed that the concrete around the spout looks like it's been patched before. I have another plumber coming out wed and said he can chip away around the spout and fix it that way. I would prefer this rather than tearing up the floor inside the house. He couldn't give me an estimate and said they basically have to just start in and see how it goes. My question is "has anyone had this done before? And was it an extensive job?" My husband and I live in AZ so we can't be there to see it ourselves. The house is on a slab, so there are no crawl spaces to get to the pipe. Only concrete. Any advice would be appreciated! I've attached a photo of the spout. Thanks!

image.jpeg
 
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Terry

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hosebib_split.jpg


A frostfree faucet can split between the washer and the hose outlet.
Typically, you would need to access the pipe behind the faucet for the repair. Normally these are installed inside a wall, or sometimes a crawlspace.
Installing in the slab floor is something I haven't seen yet.
 

Gary Swart

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A frost free valve is not frost free if it can not drain when it is shut off. If you leave a hose connected, it will freeze. If the pipe is split inside the house, replacement is not too hard although the valve must have a downward pitch. If the split is in the concrete, you will have to break out the concrete, if you just replace what's there, it will break again when it freezes.
 

Dj2

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Mistake 1: you are an absentee landlord.

To fix it, you will need to cut the concrete.
 
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