Horizontal sewage ejector piping before reaching final drain?

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Chris Curtin

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Hi,
How much level horizontal can I use on a sewage ejector setup before reaching the final drain?
The builder's tie in for the basement bathroom is a horizontal stub out, half way into the joist bay, connected to the main drain.
The issue is that where they put the ejector pit and bathroom plumbing, it is impossible to cut holes in the joists to get there on a gravity drain anywhere near the pump. (HVAC runs in a full joist bay about half way from the pump to the tie in the length of the house).

So can I pump up to the bottom of the joists, run horizontal for about 10 feet, then up another 1 foot or so, then tie into that drain? I think I can get some gravity into the stub out, but it is the horizontal I'm worried about.
Top of pit to bottom of joist is 8 1/2 feet, roughly 10 feet to where I can go vertical again. Since this is below the joists, I can use 45s for the transitions if that helps.

Thanks
Chris
 

Breplum

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I have a friend that is at the bottom of a 150' driveway and pumps up to the street. Horizontal distance is not so much of an issue (except for friction) and pump size is based on total height. So we either use mfr's sizing charts or better yet, call the tech desk of the mfr to discuss the matter prior to ordering.
My cousin Stuart lives in Canton.
 

Chris Curtin

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Thanks. I found a sizing chart today from one of the vendors and they talk about increments of 100 feet of pipe in the static head calcs, so I guess 10 isn't an issue. Thanks for the reply.
 

John Gayewski

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Thanks. I found a sizing chart today from one of the vendors and they talk about increments of 100 feet of pipe in the static head calcs, so I guess 10 isn't an issue. Thanks for the reply.
That pipe will be full of whatever godawfulness is pumped into to. Just be aware that you have a pipe filled with sewer water at all times. Generally it would be just the riser that would remain full so when you change the pump you'd drain the riser and then be free and clear. With your setup, when the time comes to change the pump you will be dripped with godawfulness the entire process.
 

wwhitney

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With your setup, when the time comes to change the pump you will be dripped with godawfulness the entire process.
Which would be an argument for installing all the horizontals before the high point pitched back towards the pit.

As to the OP, have you considered the feasibility of rerouting the HVAC? Or maybe dropping a section down below the joists, possibly reconfiguring it as a thinner rectangular cross section at that point? Not sure that's a tradeoff worth making, but you could consider it.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Tuttles Revenge

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That pipe will be full of whatever godawfulness is pumped into to. Just be aware that you have a pipe filled with sewer water at all times. Generally it would be just the riser that would remain full so when you change the pump you'd drain the riser and then be free and clear. With your setup, when the time comes to change the pump you will be dripped with godawfulness the entire process.
That is the reason that a Gate valve is installed after the check valve.. The valve is turned off preventing any of the Gawdawfulness from coming back down the pipe.

Also the sewage ejector should be tied in downstream of all other fixtures and into a 4" drain.
 

John Gayewski

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That is the reason that a Gate valve is installed after the check valve.. The valve is turned off preventing any of the Gawdawfulness from coming back down the pipe.

Also the sewage ejector should be tied in downstream of all other fixtures and into a 4" drain.
A gate valve would be nice and they are technically required here. No one does it though. I'm not sure why but they never have gate valves here. Not are they readily available. What kind do you use? 1.5 and 2"gate valves made of pvc aren't around here for whatever reason. Occasionally a ball valve is there and I've only installed those at different times, mostly commercial.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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We use threaded brass gate valves. The PVC ball valves aren't allowed because they aren't a full 2" in diameter inside.. by 1/8"!

We have to use pressure rated fittings and pipe too.. No ABS or DWV... oh.. except for the no hub bands used to make connections in the sump... I'm sure one day they'll make us upgrade those to some pressure rated fitting that doesn't exist.
 

Chris Curtin

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Thanks, there will be a gate valve for maintenance.
Wayne, I'm going to get up in the joist with the HVAC this weekend to see if there is a way to get above it and have enough of a pitch to the connection the builder left me to make moving the vent worth it.
 
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