Fleck 5600, twin 1054 tanks and chlorine injection. Valve leak, media replace

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spiro

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Hi everyone. First time posting here and hoping to get some advise from the experts on well water treatment options.
I apologize in advance for the lengthy post but I figured that if I'm gonna take someone's valuable time I should at least present all the facts in order to make their answer more objective and minimize the effort on their part.
I also hope for this post to serve as a complete guide to the next person with similar issues.
I will summarize at the end below the red heading for brevity ...scroll down V

Location: Marlboro NJ. We are on a hill and street level is about 150 ft below the house Well is 315 ft deep drilled in 1989. We are surrounded by some farmland, very little industrial and overall a suburban community setting. 4 people in my family, two little kids that leave the water on and wife that takes half hour long showers and uses the laundry daily. I use untreated water for some of the irrigation on this 5 acre property

We bought this house around 2015 and this is our first house with well water. We did the necessary testing and had the system checked. I noticed orange stains in toilets and sinks but we where told system was functional and might need adjustment. I was also told it was a good system that I should keep. ( I liked the house so I went with it)
I was also told that the system had been serviced regularly and media in the tanks is less than 5 years old.
We did a water test as part of the purchase and then another one about 1.5 years later. both came out the same.
Some of the water test results are as follows: ( I did not include any results with negligible value)
I believe the values are expressed in Micro-grams/liter or ppm
Mercury <.0002
Lead <1.0
Iron <.03
Manganese <.01
PH 7.25
Nitrate <.3
Gross alpha 2.19 pCi/l

water treatment system consists of the following components:

315 ft deep well -Goulds 10gs15 1.5hp 230 volt pump, pressure switch set at ( I think) 70/40, then going through a sentiment filter (I think this is useless because it clogs immediately and has brown and some black and/or colorless slimy stuff inside and bad sewage smell.) I clean it periodically. This was bypassed when we first moved in
It is followed by a pressure tank (I think 40 gallon), then to a
Salt container with twin 10x54 tanks controlled by a Fleck 5600 valve.
Then we have a chlorine injection system with a Steiner pump and a 75 gallon retention tank. (Not sure if this is for bacteria treatment or an oxidation step to remove the iron and magnesium, or both)
This is followed by a 10x54 carbon tank (I guess to remove the chlorine) and finally this goes to the house.
I will try to post pictures on next post but not sure if I can do that as a new member.

The water feel was a shock initially as I did not have experience with "soft" water before _ it added time to my showers as Im trying to wash away the oily/silky residue_ but I researched it and I guess I accepted it.
I immediately noticed the bad egg/sulfur smell on the first morning here but after talking to neighbors and friends I decided it wasn't harmful. (we use a cooler for drinking water)
A few months later after we settled in somewhat I decided to fix the nuisance smell and the staining. I also noticed some other things and searched on the internet for advice. I looked in the toilet tanks and saw some orange settlement but not much. Sometimes I notice a white/clear film if I put the water in a pot to boil it. I also see white foam come out of the spigot on the garden hose spray which goes away after a while.
I brought in several water treatment companies that I paid for consultation and did not like the explanations or absence of explanations or wrong suggestions or the overall absence of attention to detail and it turns out everyone was suggesting what they where selling. I don't blame them but I was bothered by the fact that I would have to depend on them if something were to break or operate out of spec and so I decided to study the system so I can at least make an informed decision in the event of a failure.
I then proceeded to put the inline filter back on line and I clean it every couple of months and change it every six months. I also shortened the time between regeneration on the softener and the carbon tank. This alleviated the orange stains (not sure which action made the difference). A couple of months later I noticed a grey ring around the toilet bowls where the water comes to rest in the tank. This is very hard to clean _I had to use a pumice stone_. I noticed that my salt was being consumed faster (I use about one pallet a year now) Finally the fleck valve started to leak a little and I can see brown water on the shaft that connects to the piston. My assessment is that the piston is bad and this is costly and labor intensive to replace so I started looking to replace the whole valve. THIS IS WHERE IT ALL TOOK A TURN. I brought in a local company who said the grey ring on the toilets was most likely the carbon leaching out from the carbon tank due to deterioration from the chlorine, they said the media on all tanks is probably too old and that the valve repair would be $600.00. The media on all tanks should be replaced at a cost of $1800.00 (3 tanks x 600)
They said technology has changed significantly and my system was outdated. They recommended the EVOLVE EVR TWIN TANK SOFTENER with a built in chlorine generator along with a service contract.
This would be a $7,000.00 installation plus the yearly service contract.
It looks like a good system but its only sold through dealers and I refuse to be a slave to a proprietary system without a warranty unless I take the service contract. It is also very expensive and I cant afford it at the moment. Or ever :(
It made sense to look for a whole new system and so this is where I fell in the "rabbit hole" of endless research and opinions.
In the process of looking I decided that the DIY option would be best. I can handle the installation, I understand chemistry and physics and have an engineering background. I have tools, I have a proven record of DIY and this choice forces me to learn the things that are important to me and my family and allows for flexibility, and so here I am.
It looks like I have 4-5 options
-Air injection system as a pre-filter and repair the rest then maybe do away with the chlorine setup except that this guy at "uswatersystemsdotcom" says it doesnt work 100% unless a lot of time is spent on disassembling and cleaning often cost aprox $800.00 plus replace media and valve
-peroxide injection except for the additional initial cost and cost for peroxide and the maintenance involved cost aprox $3,500.00
-Ozone injection with an ozone generator built in (haven't researched enough)???
- keep existing format/style/technology and purchase a twin tank with a fleck 9100sxt and new media as a package (Fleck WS-96k-91SXT 9100SXT Dual Tank Water Softener 96k, 96,000 Grain with The Digital 9100 sxt Valve, Almond Or Black) cost $1600.00
and add a brand new Fleck 2510 SXT Backwashing Catalytic Carbon Filter $899.00 essentially I would be keeping my existing chlorine injection system.
- Buy the media (I will need to ask what kind) and replace it myself and then either replace or repair existing valve, or upgrade to a better valve.
I will summarize below for clarity.

Existing old fleck 5600 system with chlorine injection valve leaking all media needs replacing


water test

Mercury <.0002
Lead <1.0
Iron <.03
Manganese <.01
PH 7.25
Nitrate <.3
Gross alpha 2.19 pCi/l

choices:

1. keep system and repair or upgrade valve / replace media
2. Air injection: remove chlorine, repair or upgrade valve / replace media
3. Ozone generator: Keep system repair/replace and add ozone instead of chlorine
4. Peroxide injection: remove chlorine repair or upgrade valve / replace media
5. Purchase new: twin tank and media with new 9100sxt valve and new carbon filter with 2510sxt valve

Questions:

1. What type of media is best for my situation? (softener for the twin tanks and de-chlorination-carbon)
2. how much do I need for each softener tank and how much carbon?
3. Can you recommend a vendor in my area or online where I can make all the purchases?
4. Is air injection a choice? does it work? is there one that needs less maintenance?
5. can a evolve EVR system be purchased direct? Is it a good choice? (I guess I like the chlorine generator and the "regeneration as needed" feature)
6. is Ozone a choice? Im not sure I can justify the cost vs benefit and doubt it could work as reliably (ozone production might be slow!)
7. should I buy a twin vortex type of tank where the water enters at the bottom? it makes sense to me that it would work better. can you recommend one?
8. Do you drink the water that comes out of any of these processes or use RO for that purpose? All my neighbors say the water is good to drink as is, as long as it doesn't smell.
9. Is there any new technology that I haven't explored yet?
10. What would you do in this situation for your own house with a budget of $3,000.00 or so?

I really appreciate the time you took to read this and await your advice
Thank you in advance
Spiro
 

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Here is some pictures
 

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spiro

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and the rest
 

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spiro

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Sorry. One more question. I had an idea a few months ago but didn't know if it was possible. I was just educating myself some more on this forum and came across this post by GTOwagon https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/neighbor-drilled-fracked-new-well-yay.82581/. I bought a CSV valve a few months ago but I never installed it. After I bought it I realized that by installing this restriction on the output of the pump I would be pressurizing the pipes (Im not sure if its pvc or copper) all the way down to the pump _315 ft_ and was afraid of them bursting. I instead thought that a safer way to get rid of the pressure tank and maintain constant pressure would be what the OP suggested on post # 4 on that thread. I did think that this would have the beneficial effect of aerating the water but didn't know how I could deal with the stuff settling on the bottom of that tank so I didnt move forward. I still have this valve so now that Im revisiting this do you see any way to incorporate it in my future design/system and have a way to remove the solids settling on the bottom of that tank?
 

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There is info such as the 'hardness' quantity missing from your lab test summary. Suggest posting a scan of the entire report as it is often useful to review all information.

By your description of the system, it sounds if treatment is backwards from usual practice. Although your numbers indicate the iron quantity is relatively low, as there is an iron removal system, the iron is to be addressed before the softener. A water softener is normally the final treatment device before water is sent to the home's fixtures.

A Fleck 5600 is a single tank valve. The valve on the tank beside the chlorine tank is a 5600 Time Clock version. While I would expect that tank to be the carbon filter, the labels on the 5600's rear cover indicate it is a softener programmed to utilize 18lbs of salt. Perhaps the rear cover was damaged or lost and so a replacement cover was obtained from a softener valve without the labels being removed.

A Fleck 5600 is very simple to rebuild yourself, likely for $75 or less.

Chlorine will normally be injected before the inlet to the retention tank to allow chlorine increased contact time to oxidize iron, manganese, sulphur etc, but your injection location appears to be after the retention tank, directly before the inlet to the 5600.

I suspect the twin tank system is a Fleck 9100 valve. If you post photos with the cover removed, that will help to verify the specific valve. To confirm, is the brine tank line only connected to the twin tank valve?
 

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Hi Bannerman. Thank you for your reply. I had the water test scanned some time ago. I might be missing a page. I will look for it tomorrow and post back. I will also look for the rest of the discrepancies also and reply asap .
 

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hmm this is the only thing I have. Unless Im blind I do not see any other info. I will order a new test tomorrow and post back as soon as I have it.
 

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I anticipated the hardness amount would have been specified as it is usually indicated in most well test reports.

How recent was the test performed? Even if you obtain another test, it appears that lab does not report water hardness. If you plan to install and maintain your own equipment, consider obtaining a Hach 5b Total Hardness test kit so you may periodically test the hardness of both of the raw water and the softened to verify the softener's function.

A twin tank softener is not generally utilized for a residential application unless, for some reason, continuous soft water is required 24/7, or the hardness quantity is extreme. In your case, I suspect excessive hardness.

With regard to media quantity, each 10" X 54" tank is appropriate for 1.5 cuft. For a softener, 1.5 cuft of cation resin will provide 30K grains usable softening capacity when regenerated with 9 lbs salt, or 36K grains when regenerated with 12 lbs salt. Those are the usually recommended settings since either will provide a good balance of salt efficiency, usable capacity and water quality. Softening resin will often have a lifespan of 10-20 years, particularly when not constantly exposed to an oxidizer such as chlorine.

For a carbon filter, each 1 cuft of carbon will effectively support up to 3 gpm (4.5 gpm for 1.5 cuft), but if your primary concern is chlorine removal, that flow rate may be exceeded as carbon will easily remove chlorine with minimal contact time. Because your carbon media is ~5 years old, it should be replaced as carbon in a backwashing filter will typically have a lifespan of 3-5 years.

You state your sediment filter clogs immediately. If the problem is actual sediment, you may wish to consider a flushable filter such as shown here: https://view.publitas.com/impact-water-products/2018-catalog-final/page/157

As you also stated 'slimy stuff' and orange accumulation in toilets and sinks, that could be iron-reducing bacteria which along with sulfur odour, could be the reasons for chlorine injection. Although IRB is not a health concern, it is not usually wanted. If the chlorine is being injected directly before the carbon filter, then there will be insufficient opportunity for the chlorine to perform its intended task before being removed by the carbon.
 
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spiro

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Ok I will address some of the knowns and will order a proper water test (last one was done 2017) I will also obtain a Hach 5b Total Hardness test kit as per your suggestion. (I already ordered one this morning)

Chlorine will normally be injected before the inlet to the retention tank to allow chlorine increased contact time to oxidize iron, manganese, sulphur etc, but your injection location appears to be after the retention tank, directly before the inlet to the 5600.


Chlorine is definitely injected before the 75 gallon contact tank. Sorry the pictures did not show that.

...I suspect excessive hardness...
Yes I just realized this particular test water was obtained at the kitchen faucet. I will retest at the well head. I will instruct the lab to test for total hardness. I remember reading somewhere on the test that it was tested raw and untreated as well but cant find that anymore....I should of been more meticulous and organised!

You state your sediment filter clogs immediately. If the problem is actual sediment.......
I misspoke, its not exactly grains or flakes. The filter gets clogged with brown/reddish mud like substance. Its somewhat grainy but feels a lot smaller than grains of sand, almost smooth. At the bottom of the filter I notice black/clear slime, most likely bacteria. I bought one of the filters you recommended (spindown filter). I did not install it because of the maintenance required. After I got it , I realized how small it was and looked like it would probably have to be flushed daily.

I will take pictures of the valve on the twin tank or try to find identifying marks.
The twin tank is certainly desirable but might be there for the excessive hardness as you stated. As I understand it the second tank gets cleaned with clean water that comes off the first one. (am i right?) The softener in my case is the first step in my system. I guess what I need is an extra stage right where the water enters the house (replacing the filter I have now and gets clogged). I also would like to identify the role of the chlorine injection stage. How would I know if its there for sanitation or oxidation of the iron etc. Is it contact time or size of retention tank that matters in each case?
 

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Thanks for the clarification and diagram.

The flow switch located between the retention tank and 5600, does not appear similar to the current switches and may be mistaken for the injection location, especially in photos, it is difficult to distinguish a wire from a hose.

Since the provided test result may refer to treated water, the iron amount to be addressed may actually be much higher than indicated. With the softener as the first treatment device, it is forced to remove iron instead of allowing the chlorine to oxidize ferrous iron into ferric iron (rust) which can then be removed by simple filtration. A softener exposed to ferrous iron will normally utilize additional salt and require ongoing periodic cleaning using citric acid, Iron Out or a similar acid cleaner to remove iron deposits that will accumulate on the resin (iron fouling) and impair its ability to efficiently remove hardness. Once a comprehensive test is obtained, the results should provide a better indication of issues to be addressed.

As I understand it the second tank gets cleaned with clean water that comes off the first one. (am i right?)

A twin tank softener is typically configured to regenerate the depleted tank with soft water obtained from the online tank. Of larger benefit, since a second tank will immediately take over providing soft water when the first tank's programmed capacity becomes depleted, no reserve capacity will be needed as is required with a single tank softener, thereby allowing the entire regenerated capacity in each tank to be fully utilized on an ongoing basis. The reserve allocation is normally 1-day usage capacity so when the hardness quantity is high, the reserve allocation will represent a substantial amount of regenerated capacity which may or may not be fully utilized each cycle in a single tank unit.

At the bottom of the filter I notice black/clear slime, most likely bacteria.
If you place some of that slime into 2 separate containers, what is the reaction if you add a small amount of chlorine bleach to one compared to the other that remains exposed to air? Perhaps a sample of the untreated slime should be sent to the lab for testing.

I did not install it because of the maintenance required. After I got it, I realized how small it was and looked like it would probably have to be flushed daily.
Flushing may be automated in some units.

A larger capacity filter can usually be adapted for use with smaller diameter plumbing. As an alternative, multiple filters could be utilized to stage filtration, with a coarser screen initially, progressing to finer screens in subsequent stages.

How would I know if its there for sanitation or oxidation of the iron etc. Is it contact time or size of retention tank that matters in each case?
The size of the retention tank (aka: contact tank) is to provide contact time. For instance, if the flow to the house is 5 gpm, with a 75-gallon tank, it will take 15 minutes from when the water enters the tank to when it exits. Since the chlorine was injected as the water enters the tank, then the contact time will be considered as 15 minutes. Of further consideration will be the amount of chlorine injected which will be a product of the chlorine's initial strength and dilution factor, and the Stenner pump's settings for the anticipated water flow rate. The bacteria and iron load will determine the injection amount and contact duration needed. To ensure effectiveness, a greater amount of chlorine than needed is often injected leaving the carbon to remove any residual chlorine and oxidized debris.

Edit to add: Perhaps the 'slime' is actually fine silt that feels somewhat slimy due to its consistency. While you stated the well is 315' deep, the elevation of the pump is not specified. If too deep, the pump may be disturbing silt located at the bottom of the well which is being drawn into the pump's inlet.
 
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Reach4

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1. Briefly, what are your symptoms? I think it was that the cartridge filter was clogging too soon. If that is it, maybe remove the cartridge, and let the backwashing tanks deal with what gets through.

2. Is the water tested before or after your water treatment? I presume after.

Some of the water test results are as follows: ( I did not include any results with negligible value)
I believe the values are expressed in Micro-grams/liter or ppm
Mercury <.0002
3. Any result with a < means the number is below the test sensitivity.

4. mg/l is the same as ppm, not micrograms/l.

5. Use the drain valve at your pressure tank (called diaphragm tank in your diagram) to get rid of sediment periodically.

6. A contact tank should have a blowdown valve to let you be rid of what settles out. Having a contact tank with blowdown early in the chain could get rid of a bunch of crud.
 

spiro

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Thanks for the clarification and diagram.

The flow switch located between the retention tank and 5600, does not appear similar to the current switches and may be mistaken for the injection location, especially in photos, it is difficult to distinguish a wire from a hose.

Since the provided test result may refer to treated water, the iron amount to be addressed may actually be much higher than indicated. With the softener as the first treatment device, it is forced to remove iron instead of allowing the chlorine to oxidize ferrous iron into ferric iron (rust) which can then be removed by simple filtration. A softener exposed to ferrous iron will normally utilize additional salt and require ongoing periodic cleaning using citric acid, Iron Out or a similar acid cleaner to remove iron deposits that will accumulate on the resin (iron fouling) and impair its ability to efficiently remove hardness. Once a comprehensive test is obtained, the results should provide a better indication of issues to be addressed.

I was not aware of Iron Out. I will research and pick some up to use in the future. I agree on the comprehensive test and will also send the "slime' for analysis and report back/post the results.

A twin tank softener is typically configured to regenerate the depleted tank with soft water obtained from the online tank. Of larger benefit, since a second tank will immediately take over providing soft water when the first tank's programmed capacity becomes depleted, no reserve capacity will be needed as is required with a single tank softener, thereby allowing the entire regenerated capacity in each tank to be fully utilized on an ongoing basis. The reserve allocation is normally 1-day usage capacity so when the hardness quantity is high, the reserve allocation will represent a substantial amount of regenerated capacity which may or may not be fully utilized each cycle in a single tank unit.


If you place some of that slime into 2 separate containers, what is the reaction if you add a small amount of chlorine bleach to one compared to the other that remains exposed to air? Perhaps a sample of the untreated slime should be sent to the lab for testing.
I did not think of this either, I will perform the test and post results/pictures. That's a great idea and easy to do!

Flushing may be automated in some units.

A larger capacity filter can usually be adapted for use with smaller diameter plumbing. As an alternative, multiple filters could be utilized to stage filtration, with a coarser screen initially, progressing to finer screens in subsequent stages.

I have the same one you linked earlier. Depending on test results and overall design of new system, I will have to look for a different one and plump it to the waste line.

The size of the retention tank (aka: contact tank) is to provide contact time. For instance, if the flow to the house is 5 gpm, with a 75-gallon tank, it will take 15 minutes from when the water enters the tank to when it exits. Since the chlorine was injected as the water enters the tank, then the contact time will be considered as 15 minutes. Of further consideration will be the amount of chlorine injected which will be a product of the chlorine's initial strength and dilution factor, and the Stenner pump's settings for the anticipated water flow rate. The bacteria and iron load will determine the injection amount and contact duration needed. To ensure effectiveness, a greater amount of chlorine than needed is often injected leaving the carbon to remove any residual chlorine and oxidized debris. I think this describes my setup since 5 gpm is what I can draw from my current system and size of contact tank is 75 gallon. I think chlorine is dialed high as well. There is a drain at the bottom of the contact tank. I will take Reach4's suggestion and run it periodically if chlorine stays in my future. Im also puzzled why both of you said it should be at the beginning but in my setup its the last stage!

Edit to add: Perhaps the 'slime' is actually fine silt that feels somewhat slimy due to its consistency. While you stated the well is 315' deep, the elevation of the pump is not specified. If too deep, the pump may be disturbing silt located at the bottom of the well which is being drawn into the pump's inlet.
I don't know the pump depth. Cant think of a way to find out except maybe drop a weight on a string and hope to "feel" the pump
 

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1. Briefly, what are your symptoms?

At the moment Im trying to figure out a re-design. What brought this on was that the _still un-udendifined_ valve leaks and my long term symptoms were/are
important
1.grey line on toilets at the water line
2.sulfur or rotten egg smell

not important
1. pressure varies significantly when cycling. Have not determined yet at which point of the cycle

2. maintenance salt and chlorine use is excessive



I think it was that the cartridge filter was clogging too soon. If that is it, maybe remove the cartridge, and let the backwashing tanks deal with what gets through.
I will incorporate that into the routine as well, Whats stopping me from doing all this now is that I dont have a drain near by. Only the rubber waste line, I have plans to install an ejection pump and put a sink at this location...

2. Is the water tested before or after your water treatment? I presume after.
I just realized it was after


3. Any result with a < means the number is below the test sensitivity.

4. mg/l is the same as ppm, not micrograms/l.

5. Use the drain valve at your pressure tank (called diaphragm tank in your diagram) to get rid of sediment periodically.

6. A contact tank should have a blowdown valve to let you be rid of what settles out. Having a contact tank with blowdown early in the chain could get rid of a bunch of crud.
it does but its the last thing on the chain. It might still make a difference
 

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I don't know the pump depth.
Is the well driller that installed the current pump still around? (Often indicated under the well cap or on a label located nearby to the pump's power switch) If so, he may have kept records for each installation. If he transferred business ownership to someone else, his records may have been also transferred.

Edit to add: Perhaps the company with the label on the side of the twin tank controller, also installed the current submersible pump and would know its depth.
 
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Reach4

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Problem recaps important:
1.grey line on toilets at the water line
2.sulfur or rotten egg smell
I don't know what causes your ring. Pummie brand pumice stick is nice for rubbing out toilet rings. Some toilets warn about using abrasive stuff, but whatever is there is not working for you.

You might see if sanitizing your well helps. https://terrylove.com/forums/index....izing-extra-attention-to-4-inch-casing.65845/ is my write-up.
1. pressure varies significantly when cycling. Have not determined yet at which point of the cycle
2. maintenance salt and chlorine use is excessive

If you do some plumbing changes, I suggest you add some boiler drain valves. Those can be useful for sampling, including sampling for residual chlorine levels. They can also mount a GHT (garden hose thread) pressure gauge, to see where the pressure drops are. The cartridge filter would be a good candidate for pressure drops at higher flows.

For salt use, measuring the hardness of the incoming water would be important to the setup of the softener.
 

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Is the well driller that installed the current pump still around? (Often indicated under the well cap or on a label located nearby to the pump's power switch) If so, he may have records for each installation. If he transferred business ownership to someone else, his records may have also been transferred.
Well driller too busy to look at his records....reached out a couple of years ago. Didn't seem he wanted to help. I even offered a fee for the info he said he would get back to me. He almost seemed bothered that I was wasting his time. I got turned off and didn't bother again. I will look on the equipment for a clue.
 

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Problem recaps important:
I don't know what causes your ring. Pummie brand pumice stick is nice for rubbing out toilet rings. Some toilets warn about using abrasive stuff, but whatever is there is not working for you.
I was cautioned against it too but cant win them all....wife said ring was ugly. I had to make it beautiful :)
You might see if sanitizing your well helps. https://terrylove.com/forums/index....izing-extra-attention-to-4-inch-casing.65845/ is my write-up.


If you do some plumbing changes, I suggest you add some boiler drain valves. Those can be useful for sampling, including sampling for residual chlorine levels. They can also mount a GHT (garden hose thread) pressure gauge, to see where the pressure drops are. The cartridge filter would be a good candidate for pressure drops at higher flows.

For salt use, measuring the hardness of the incoming water would be important to the setup of the softener.
Makes sense. Most important is to wait for the test. Got to feed the kids now, I will go to the basement later for more details and right back.
 

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1. pressure varies significantly when cycling. Have not determined yet at which point of the cycle
Unclear. The pressure of what and when cycling which equipment?

The flow to drain for the water softener, will not be consistent for the entire regeneration cycle. The flow rate to drain during Backwash and Rapid Rinse will be 2.4 gpm for a 10" diameter tank whereas Brine Draw will likely be slightly over 1 gpm for ~15 minutes and less for the remaining cycle time (usually ~45 minutes) depending on the installed injector. Although there will be no flow to drain during Brine Fill, some amount of water as determined by the salt setting will refill the Brine tank at 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 gpm depending on which flow restrictor is installed.

Since a twin tank softener will typically regenerate the depleted tank soon after soft water delivery is transferred to the alternate tank, pressure fluctuation may be noticed at the home's fixtures while regeneration is occurring.

Although the Backwash and Rapid Rinse flow rate for the carbon filter will likely be ~6 gpm, this will usually not be noticed as the process normally occurs during the night when little or no water is being consumed.

2. maintenance salt and chlorine use is excessive
Until the proper lab results are available, we will not know what the appropriate salt or chlorine amounts should be.
 
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