Compression sleeve removal shrank copper pipe, new compression fittings slide off

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Diwhoops

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tl;dr: Removal of an over-compressed ferrule seems to have deformed copper pipe to a smaller size such that a new compression fitting slides right off, even when tightened down. A temporary Sharkbite cap is holding and not leaking. Can I just put a Sharkbite angle stop on and be done, should I have a plumber come out and sweat on a new pipe, or is there another option?

I recently decided to upgrade the old compression-fit multi-turn angle stop behind my toilet to an angle stop with a quarter-turn ball valve. I got the old compression fitting off but the ferrule was stuck. I tried to attach a new compression-fit BrassCraft angle stop using the existing ferrule and compression nut. Unfortunately, I didn't RTM (no excuses) and cranked the compression fitting pretty tight; when I turned on the water there was a slight leak, so I cranked it down even farther (oof). Since I couldn't get the leak to stop by tightening (duh), I decided to use a sleeve puller from HD to remove the old ferrule.

I was successful in removing the ferrule using the sleeve puller, however it appears that pulling the over-crimped ferrule over the length of the copper pipe has significantly altered the size of the pipe - it's narrower (OD is smaller). So much narrower, in fact, that a brand new compression fitting won't stay on (tried with two different ones). Even if I tighten it down much farther than I should, it still just spins and I can pull right off the pipe. This change in OD is apparent just by looking at or feeling the pipe, and is unfortunately close enough back to the wall that I don't think I can trim the deformed section of pipe and get a new compression fitting on (maaaaybe if I lose the escutcheon). Other than the change in OD, the pipe appears to be in good shape.

Thankfully, I had purchased a Sharkbite 1/2" cap in case things didn't go my way; even more thankfully, it seems to be holding without leaking.

So I am seeking your wisdom, professionals and experienced amateur plumbers of Terry Love Forums: what should I do? Here are the options as I see them:
1) Slap a Sharkbite angle stop on the pipe and call it a day. I plan to do this temporarily since the existing Sharkbite fitting has lasted 12h without leaking, but I don't really like it for long-term.
2) Use some tool (???) to re-shape the existing copper pipe back up to the correct diameter. I don't know what that looks like or if it's possible (or smart).
3) Get a plumber to cut the deformed part out and sweat on an extension. This seems like the best course of action, but the most expensive. If that's what needs to happen then I'll do it, but I'm here to see what y'all think first.

Thanks!
 

Terry

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The simplest fix is to cut back the copper to where it's still full sized, and just have the shutoff closer to the wall, even if that means not having the escutcheon behind or even slightly burying the backing nut into the wall some.
No tape on compression threads, you can use some pipe dope.
 

Jeff H Young

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if sharkbite cap works so will angle stop not crazy about what you describe. Be safer to get on a non deformed pipe
 

John Gayewski

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I've had the sharkbite fittings develope a leak in this situation. According to the person who installed the sharkbite cap it wasn't leaking at first, but it developed a leak after a couple of weeks due to good knows what. Maybe it got bumped. But we ended up using new copper.
 

Diwhoops

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Thanks all, that's helpful. I've temporarily replaced the cap with a (Sharkbite) angle stop so that the toilet is useable, but my long-term plan is to get a plumber to add some new copper pipe, so a compression fitting doesn't have to go behind the escutcheon or into the wall.

I've got one more toilet that "needs" (that's a strong word) a new angle stop, so taking what I've learned through this experience and your thoughts I've got another shot at making a compression fitting work. If that one doesn't go well either, then at least I only have to call out a plumber one time.
 

Terry

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You can cut the copper back and solder on more to extend out further, it's a job for a plumber, with water handy so that you don't burn the structure down. We replace a lot of shutoffs, so for us cutting a small portion off the end, allowing the new shutoff to slide on, makes more sense most of the time. Putting heat close to the wall and adding a coupling rarely looks good.
 
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