Brine fill issue

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James Herrin

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I will raise the check valve so the water will be above the grid.

My other question is about the quality of my softened water. I am using 8lbs salt/cu. ft. of resin. My water tested at 45gpg before the softener and 8gpg after the softener. Does that sound right? I was expecting the softened water to test closer to 0. Is my well water too hard to soften it to 0?
 

Bannerman

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After I reduced my BF, which meant the water level was not above the grid, I did not use any salt for 3 weeks and my water felt very hard.
Since it seems, salt was being consumed prior to reducing the BF time, perhaps your 11" high grid is equipped with holes that are too high from the bottom of the beer cup shaped legs, so water was no longer entering/exiting the legs to dissolve salt after the BF setting was reduced.

Suggest removing the salt from the brine tank to inspect where the holes are located, and if the existing holes are too high, drill additional holes through the sides, close to the bottom of each leg.

Although you will be normally utilizing and regenerating only 60K of the total 80K capacity possible for 2.5 ft3 of resin, the additional capacity greater than 60K is utilized to reduce hardness leakage through the resin bed. IOW, all 80K capacity is utilized to remove hardness, but capacity will be regenerated once 60K has been consumed.

Since no capacity had been regenerated for multiple cycles, all 80K grains of the resin's total capacity will have been exhausted. Now 80K grains capacity will need to be regenerated 1X to reduce hardness leakage and allow the softener to provide the softest water possible under normal use.

Because 50 lbs salt would be required to regenerate all 80K capacity, more than 16 gallons water would be needed. As 16 gallons all at once would likely cause the safety float to be lifted and also cause much of the dry salt to become wet and partially dissolved, suggest instead, use a bucket to add an additional 3 gallons water into the brine well, wait ~1 hour to allow additional salt to dissolve, then initiate a manual regeneration cycle. Once the 1st cycle has concluded, wait ~1 hr, then initiate a 2nd manual regeneration using only the water that automatically entered during the 1st cycle.. The 2nd regeneration could be started before you depart for bed.

The two regenerations back-to-back should substantially reduce the amount of hardness leakage that is currently occuring.
 

James Herrin

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Since it seems, salt was being consumed prior to reducing the BF time, perhaps your 11" high grid is equipped with holes that are too high from the bottom of the beer cup shaped legs, so water was no longer entering/exiting the legs to dissolve salt after the BF setting was reduced.

Suggest removing the salt from the brine tank to inspect where the holes are located, and if the existing holes are too high, drill additional holes through the sides, close to the bottom of each leg.

Although you will be normally utilizing and regenerating only 60K of the total 80K capacity possible for 2.5 ft3 of resin, the additional capacity greater than 60K is utilized to reduce hardness leakage through the resin bed. IOW, all 80K capacity is utilized to remove hardness, but capacity will be regenerated once 60K has been consumed.

Since no capacity had been regenerated for multiple cycles, all 80K grains of the resin's total capacity will have been exhausted. Now 80K grains capacity will need to be regenerated 1X to reduce hardness leakage and allow the softener to provide the softest water possible under normal use.

Because 50 lbs salt would be required to regenerate all 80K capacity, more than 16 gallons water would be needed. As 16 gallons all at once would likely cause the safety float to be lifted and also cause much of the dry salt to become wet and partially dissolved, suggest instead, use a bucket to add an additional 3 gallons water into the brine well, wait ~1 hour to allow additional salt to dissolve, then initiate a manual regeneration cycle. Once the 1st cycle has concluded, wait ~1 hr, then initiate a 2nd manual regeneration using only the water that automatically entered during the 1st cycle.. The 2nd regeneration could be started before you depart for bed.

The two regenerations back-to-back should substantially reduce the amount of hardness leakage that is currently occuring.
Sorry, I should have told the whole story. I already tried to revive the resin. Over the weekend, I filled my tank completely full of water, let it sit overnight and did a manual regen the next morning. I then filled the tank again, let it set about 4hrs, then another regen and put it back in service. I had it do 3rd regen that night. Altogether I probably used 3 or 4 bags of salt. I did the water test the next day after the 3rd regen.
 

James Herrin

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Since it seems, salt was being consumed prior to reducing the BF time, perhaps your 11" high grid is equipped with holes that are too high from the bottom of the beer cup shaped legs, so water was no longer entering/exiting the legs to dissolve salt after the BF setting was reduced.

Suggest removing the salt from the brine tank to inspect where the holes are located, and if the existing holes are too high, drill additional holes through the sides, close to the bottom of each leg.

Although you will be normally utilizing and regenerating only 60K of the total 80K capacity possible for 2.5 ft3 of resin, the additional capacity greater than 60K is utilized to reduce hardness leakage through the resin bed. IOW, all 80K capacity is utilized to remove hardness, but capacity will be regenerated once 60K has been consumed.

Since no capacity had been regenerated for multiple cycles, all 80K grains of the resin's total capacity will have been exhausted. Now 80K grains capacity will need to be regenerated 1X to reduce hardness leakage and allow the softener to provide the softest water possible under normal use.

Because 50 lbs salt would be required to regenerate all 80K capacity, more than 16 gallons water would be needed. As 16 gallons all at once would likely cause the safety float to be lifted and also cause much of the dry salt to become wet and partially dissolved, suggest instead, use a bucket to add an additional 3 gallons water into the brine well, wait ~1 hour to allow additional salt to dissolve, then initiate a manual regeneration cycle. Once the 1st cycle has concluded, wait ~1 hr, then initiate a 2nd manual regeneration using only the water that automatically entered during the 1st cycle.. The 2nd regeneration could be started before you depart for bed.

The two regenerations back-to-back should substantially reduce the amount of hardness leakage that is currently occuring.
Sorry, I should have told the whole story. I already tried to revive the resin. Over the weekend, I filled my brine tank completely full of water, let it sit overnight and did a manual regen the next morning. I then filled the tank again, let it set about 4hrs, then another regen and put it back in service. I had it do 3rd regen that night. Altogether I probably used 3 or 4 bags of salt. I did the water test the next day after the 3rd regen. I will inspect the grid next and see if there is a problem.
 

Reach4

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1. With 45 hardness from your H5B test, set H to 55. That is high-hardness compensation.
2.Normally, when you use the H5B to measure hardness higher than 30, test 1 part raw water and 1 part distilled water. Hardness is 2x the number of drops.
3. An alternative to raising the check valve would be to remove the salt grid. Or maybe when you got the salt grid out, you could saw 7 inches off of the legs.

Raising the air check valve is probably easier. Remember I am just saying that the fill water should raise the liquid level higher than the top of the salt grid. I am not saying that the brine has to suck down to a level higher than the top of the salt grid. But note the level in the brine tank will usually be lower than the level in the brine tube. So you maybe want to compensate for that.
 

James Herrin

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Update- I ran multiple manual regens nightly to try and revive my resin. This also used up most of the salt in the tank, so I was able to easily empty the tank and inspect the grid. The grid had 4 hollow legs, but there were no holes in the legs except for one on the bottom, which was sitting on the bottom of the tank, so very little if any water was in contact with the salt in the legs. The grid actually had extensions on the legs which were removable. I removed those legs which lowered the grid about 4 or 5 inches. This makes my water level now 4 inches or so above the grid. After those multiple manual regens, my water was finally testing at 0. I have been running now for about 3 weeks and the water is still nice and soft. Mama is happy. I learned a lot about my system. Thank you to everyone for the help, especially Reach. I would have never been able to fix my water issue on my own. This forum and the experts who take the time to help people like me is priceless.
 
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