bleeder valves and weep holes

Users who are viewing this thread

Slugboy6000

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Points
8
Location
Ontario
Hello, I'm looking for a way to drain my plumbing back into my well.
It's a simple setup where I'd like to manually control my submersible well pump so that I can fill an open tank with water in freezing temps and let the plumbing drain itself between uses. I'm assuming that the bleeder type valves used in drain-back systems don't work without pressure and wonder if instead a weep hole in the drop pipe would be appropriate in this situation?

My pitless adapter is only 12" below grade due to bedrock, the supply line is insulated and the outlet emerges 8' away into an uninsulated shed.

Thanks

plumbing .jpg
 
Last edited:

LLigetfa

DIYer, not in the trades
Messages
7,502
Reaction score
577
Points
113
Location
NW Ontario, Canada
I'm assuming that the bleeder type valves used in drain-back systems don't work without pressure
If you constrict the discharge at the top a little or set the bleeder deep enough, then the pressure at the bleeder should get high enough to close the bleeder. Friction loss between the bleeder and the discharge alone would probably be enough for it to close.
 

Slugboy6000

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Points
8
Location
Ontario
That's great, thank you very much LL.

With a 4' frost level, I think my only other question would be how deep a drain-back / bleeder valve should be to avoid freezing.
I really don't know what the temperature is like inside of a 20' steel well casing buried in limestone in the dead of winter.
 

Valveman

Cary Austin
Staff member
Messages
14,620
Reaction score
1,299
Points
113
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Website
cyclestopvalves.com
Heat from the earth will rise in the well casing. Usually pipe in the casing will not freeze. Installing a bleeder orifice too deep will keep it from opening. Just a pound or two will keep it closed, so you don't need a pressurized system to make it work. I would set a brass bleeder about 5' deep and no deeper than 10'.

Brass bleeder orifice.jpg
 

LLigetfa

DIYer, not in the trades
Messages
7,502
Reaction score
577
Points
113
Location
NW Ontario, Canada
Installing a bleeder orifice too deep will keep it from opening. Just a pound or two will keep it closed, so you don't need a pressurized system to make it work.
Some bleeders spec no more than 10 PSI to open and even those may be special order with others requiring less pressure. The pressure needed to close one is not the same as what is needed to open one as flow is a factor. That said, if one opens at a higher pressure, it stands to reason that it might also need a higher pressure to close so I would design the system with some constriction depending on the depth and GPM of flow.
 

Slugboy6000

Member
Messages
33
Reaction score
1
Points
8
Location
Ontario
Lots to learn here, I appreciate the tips.
I do want to constrict the flow down to what will likely be a short length of potable garden hose. Unrestricted flow from my pump is too violent for my needs.
I can't find pressure specs for the two brass bleeders that I've been able to find so far (Boshart BOB07NL & Merrill BBONL75), but I should be sitting at around 4 psi (9' of head) when the pump is off.
I'll keep looking.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks