Bathtub drain seal - Silicon or plumbers putty

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Clutchcargo

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John Gayewski

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Silicone is harder to get back off. Which generally means it's better and holds longer.

We only use silicone because it takes less skill and holds better making ait a more consistent seal.

Go with the silicone. Plumbers putty is fine but it's not as good.
 

Jeff H Young

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I only use putty , I have used silicone on showerdrains and basket strainers but not on cast iron but thinner sheet metal or fiberglas it works well . Im sure if you have good tecnique silicone is good just something I dont like about using silicone that way
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I prefer silicone. One and done.

The issue I have with putty is that a lot of people use too much and after they're done torquing the fitting the putty continues to squish out and loosens the torque... For fixtures that have access that can be retorqued, but if the fitting is covered, then you're out of luck.

Out of curiosity, which duravit tub are you using? I've installed a few. Freestanding and alcove. All of them were good tubs, but had odd quirks about them. The alcove tub was built in such a fashion as to be "water saving" by its shape being narrow at the bottom in the footprint, which the homeowner didn't like. They felt it was constricting.
 

Jeff H Young

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I noticed both john and tuttles mentioned and Im sort of putting it in my words but I get the impression that you both are concerned with it taking skill to use putty on tub drains therefore you prefer silicone. But I also know you guys both have the skills to use putty come on ? what is your issue that you cant use putty, or you are talking about lack of skilled help hard to train a 19 year old to use it.
Ill tell you I personally hyave no issue with tub drains but thin baskets on press steel or stainless yea it can be a issue I also like silicone on shower pans thin ones I see.
So you set a tub come back on a special trip to fill with water or you test imediatly or not at all ?
Im not giving up either Im selective and really dont trust silicone on tubs cant really articulate why but mayybe because it seems like it would take gobs to fill it and you have metal against metal.
 

Clutchcargo

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Thanks all, I think I've gained some confidence for using silicone.
The Duravit tub is a 32" D-Code. Kind of a hybrid between alcove and drop-in. I went with the 32" to clear the joists and make it easier to center the faucet without having to move a stud. The quality is very good and it's big enough for 2 adults or 2 or 3 kids at once.
What I don't like is:
Duravit only included 4 flange clips; I'll augment this with fender washers at each stud location.
Also, there's not a lot of guidance for which drains will work or if something specific is needed. I went with a Westbrass plumbers kit from HD. The optional Duravit branded drain assembly only comes in chrome finish and has mostly negative reviews.

Edit: In my search of putty vs. silicone, there was one mention of putty staining or bleeding into the acrylic. Not sure if this is true or not.
 

Jeff H Young

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looks like a nice tub 4 flange clips cheap sob's lol fender washer good enough get that tub on solid ground with some mortar support youll be great mortar dosent need to be 100 percent some voids actually helps the excess squish and allow it to not get held up too high
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I noticed both john and tuttles mentioned and Im sort of putting it in my words but I get the impression that you both are concerned with it taking skill to use putty on tub drains therefore you prefer silicone. But I also know you guys both have the skills to use putty come on ? what is your issue that you cant use putty, or you are talking about lack of skilled help hard to train a 19 year old to use it.
Ill tell you I personally hyave no issue with tub drains but thin baskets on press steel or stainless yea it can be a issue I also like silicone on shower pans thin ones I see.
So you set a tub come back on a special trip to fill with water or you test imediatly or not at all ?
Im not giving up either Im selective and really dont trust silicone on tubs cant really articulate why but mayybe because it seems like it would take gobs to fill it and you have metal against metal.
I keep putty in my kit, but rarely use it. For a cast iron tub /kit sink I might use putty due to that conical shaped flange area. But definitely not on any fiberglass or acrylic or composite tub/shower/sink. Stainless sinks I always use silicone and especially on disposers.. I've had too many call backs from our guys using putty and the scenario I described above happens and I've got a call back.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Thanks all, I think I've gained some confidence for using silicone.
The Duravit tub is a 32" D-Code. Kind of a hybrid between alcove and drop-in. I went with the 32" to clear the joists and make it easier to center the faucet without having to move a stud. The quality is very good and it's big enough for 2 adults or 2 or 3 kids at once.
What I don't like is:
Duravit only included 4 flange clips; I'll augment this with fender washers at each stud location.
Also, there's not a lot of guidance for which drains will work or if something specific is needed. I went with a Westbrass plumbers kit from HD. The optional Duravit branded drain assembly only comes in chrome finish and has mostly negative reviews.

Edit: In my search of putty vs. silicone, there was one mention of putty staining or bleeding into the acrylic. Not sure if this is true or not.
Looking at their recommended tub drains, any of the westbrass standard tub drains will work.
 

Jeff H Young

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I keep putty in my kit, but rarely use it. For a cast iron tub /kit sink I might use putty due to that conical shaped flange area. But definitely not on any fiberglass or acrylic or composite tub/shower/sink. Stainless sinks I always use silicone and especially on disposers.. I've had too many call backs from our guys using putty and the scenario I described above happens and I've got a call back.
Basicaly you trust yourself right? Ill use putty on thin stainless but your right there is call backs if you have 10 guys and do 100 or more sinks yea youll get a call back probebly especially the greener they are , I mean no one schooled me that good I used to go to heavy with putty and had to get spanked LOL . Dang even disposals and SS sinks I dont get call backs but cant really make the jump to being more comfortable with silicone
 

Jeff H Young

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Where did you find a list of recommended tub drains? I looked for a few hours and found nothing except Duravit drains.
nothing special about that tub regular waste and overflow is fine Plain glue on is bullet proof and dont require acess panels.
I think you are safe with silicone note : manufacture recomends non acetic silicone on other areas of the tub but no mention on the tub drain itself to avoid putty.
Btw Ive never heard of a regular tub like this being specific to only use a certain waste and overflow manufacture dosent care
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Where did you find a list of recommended tub drains? I looked for a few hours and found nothing except Duravit drains.
When I opened a link for one of the D-Code tubs they show 2 at the bottom of the page. 1 only available in Chrome and the other has a White option.. so not a lot to work with. But my comment was more that - looking at the drains they offer, any other brands standard or cable drains of appropriate length will work for their tub. Some of their tubs use a proprietary overflow which took me 12wks to get a replacement when I broke it... I ended up making my own.

I like Kohlers cable drains, they have a lot of color options.
 
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