Weeping Solder Joint

Users who are viewing this thread

Smatz

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Saskatchewan
Hello,

I soldered in a shower tap and head today, when I turned the water on I noticed the 1/2" copper pipe had a slight beed of moisture on it where it is soldered to the top of the shower tap (pipe goes to shower head). There was also a small beed of moisture half way up the shower head pipe (top of soldered collar).
Now I can remove, replace and resolder the collar but what do I do about the weep on the top of the tap.
Do I heat it up, remove the pipe, clean best I can and resolder?

Thanks
 

Jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,770
Reaction score
1,191
Points
113
Location
New England
Once a solder joint has been contaminated with water, the only way to fix it is to take things apart, reclean and flux things, then put it back together.
 

Smatz

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Saskatchewan
Thanks for the reply, one other question. When I was soldering the collar joint I did the underside first then the top of the collar. I noticed when I was heating the bottom there was a small amount of black material that came up around the top of the collar. After getting a good solder on the underside of the collar I went to the top and then the solder didn't seem to want to drop into or around the top collar.
I cleaned and fluxed the pipe and inside of collar. Did I put too much flux on and the heat burned the flux? Note that the top pipe going into the top side of he collar was the old original, was there something on the inside of that?
 

Jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,770
Reaction score
1,191
Points
113
Location
New England
You may have overheated the joint. If you didn't clean it out well, that may have been an issue. You don't need to remove all of the solder in a connection, but any corrosion does need to be removed (burned flux, etc.) and the bare metal must be clean and shiny. You need enough solder out of there to be able to slide the pipe back in, though. In reality, having a nice coat of solder on the pipe/fitting can make the joint a little easier (it's called tinning). They also sell flux that has powdered solder in it that works well. Depending on where you are, the choice of flux may be limited...some of the newer ones are a lot easier to burn up...the older paste stuff is easier to get a good joint with, but can leave a taste in the water until it flushes out. There's a fine line between enough and too much flux. To someone that does it every day, they know and don't have problems...it's us DIY'ers that run into them.

Once the fitting is hot enough, you may be able to solder both ends without putting the torch back on - move the flame around and try to apply the solder to each end one right after the other.
 

Dj2

In the Trades
Messages
2,611
Reaction score
258
Points
83
Location
California
I think you may find it hard to fiddle with and to correct it. You may have to use new fittings for a successful first time soldering.

Make sure every part is sanded well, completely dry and plumbed.
 

DonL

Jack of all trades Master of one
Messages
5,205
Reaction score
72
Points
48
Location
Houston, TX
I am no pro plumber. (Unless you ask my Girl)

But the pressure that you have on your connection is not all that much.

You should get a better torch that will get with the program on your next try.


I would get a better torch and add Flux, and not add more solder, unless needed. May be no need to take it all apart.


Seems simple.
 

Smatz

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Saskatchewan
What about instead of copper I go with the clear plastic ABS pipe for the shower head piping. If that is an option is there a 3/4 nut that would screw onto the threaded connection at the top of the shower valve (1/2 copper was soldered inside but I removed), then go to plastic ABS and then from ABS back onto the existing 1/2" copper line coming down from the shower head. If this an option what are the parts that I would need?
 

Gary Swart

In the Trades
Messages
8,101
Reaction score
84
Points
48
Location
Yakima, WA
I have to take exception to Don L's comment that you may be able to just add flux and reheat. Once water has gotten into the joint, there is zero chance to do that. The joint MUST be completely disassembled and all parts cleaned. You can reuse fittings if you clean them with a wire brush or emery cloth (sand paper). Traces of the old solder are OK to leave. The key to a good solder joint is to clean to bright and shiny, flux, heat just until the solder flows when touched to the heated joint, then leave it alone until cool. Too much heat can burn off the flux, any water in the pipe will turn to steam and prevent a good joint, not cleaning the pipe and fitting will prevent a good joint, and moving the joint while still hot can crack the solder seal. It's not rocket science, but you do have to follow the proper procedure.
 

DonL

Jack of all trades Master of one
Messages
5,205
Reaction score
72
Points
48
Location
Houston, TX
I have to take exception to Don L's comment that you may be able to just add flux and reheat. Once water has gotten into the joint, there is zero chance to do that. The joint MUST be completely disassembled and all parts cleaned.


I guess I never worried about water in the connection. It will not be there long.

The flux will clean any residue that water leaves, and most likely will be water soluble.

In theory if everything is perfectly clean you do not need flux.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
29,942
Reaction score
3,461
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
I don't know anybody that reheats a joint to add solder after water has been in the line.

At least not twice!
I think we have all tried that fix ONCE. :)
 

Gary Swart

In the Trades
Messages
8,101
Reaction score
84
Points
48
Location
Yakima, WA
Taking the risk of starting a war with Don, flux is needed to sweat a joint, PERIOD. Molten solder will not draw into the joint without it. Yes, bright and shiny surfaces are also necessary, but that will not create the chemical reaction that flux provides.
 

hj

Master Plumber
Messages
33,608
Reaction score
1,047
Points
113
Location
Cave Creek, Arizona
Website
www.terrylove.com
quote; In theory if everything is perfectly clean you do not need flux.

I do not know what theory you are using, but flux IS necessary for a good solder joint. However, the water soluble fluxes will "burn" if they are overheated, which can happen if you heat the bottom joint too much before moving to the top one.
 

DonL

Jack of all trades Master of one
Messages
5,205
Reaction score
72
Points
48
Location
Houston, TX
Taking the risk of starting a war with Don, flux is needed to sweat a joint, PERIOD. Molten solder will not draw into the joint without it. Yes, bright and shiny surfaces are also necessary, but that will not create the chemical reaction that flux provides.


No war here Gary. You are correct.

I am just saying just because a joint had water in it short term does not make it unrepairable. You need no water in the pipe that can make steam, but the water in the fitting will boil off. The Flux and solder will flow with the proper heat.

If the leak is from improper cleaning then it needs to be taken apart and re-cleaned.


hj, I was using the theory in a vacuum.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
29,942
Reaction score
3,461
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
hj, I was using the theory in a vacuum.

So many things I could say here. :)

Have you seen the movie Gravity yet?
Speaking of vacuum, there were a few parts that were making my mechanical brain twist in knots. It was fun, but ilogical too.

All that stuff in space too. I was thinking of you Don.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks