Sump Pump - Air Tight Lid

Users who are viewing this thread

Nex

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Behind Monitor in Ontario
Hello Friends,

I have question, I have a house with sump pump, but in my region sump pumps are essentially non existent.

Two plumbers friends where honest with me that they don’t want to make recommendations as they don’t know any better.

Current pedestal pump is about 7 years old, so is the back flow preventer valve.

Should I replace both of those items as preventive maintenance?, if so any recommendations on pump ? Should I get pedestal or submerged one ( any proven manufacturers )

Additionally I believe this was very low quality sump pit with open holes in it, I read online that it should be sealed ?

Are there universal covers that I can retrofit to seal it ? Any recommendations.

I would appreciate feedback.

This is currently how it looks

1DCF1D5C-B2B8-4E1A-AB6D-FC1AFBAABF97-min.jpeg
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,000
Reaction score
3,775
Points
113
Location
IL
It is normal to not have a sump pit, that just catches ground water, to be sealed. That lid keeps people from stepping into a hole.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nex

Drick

In the Trades
Messages
458
Reaction score
17
Points
18
Should I replace both of those items as preventive maintenance?, if so any recommendations on pump ? Should I get pedestal or submerged one ( any proven manufacturers )
How much action does your pump see? If it only runs once in a blue moon it may have lots of life left. If it runs nonstop during the rainy season it may be time to replace it. Consider buying a leak detector with a detachable sensor. You can dangle the sensor in the pit and it will give you a warning before the basement floods. You can buy them at the big box stores for about $10. You would need to be home to hear the alarm going off, but its inexpensive and much better than nothing. If you want to seal the pit you will need a submersible pump. Avoid purchasing pumps that are controlled by a float attached to a wire.

Additionally I believe this was very low quality sump pit with open holes in it, I read online that it should be sealed ?
You may need seal it if you have a radon problem but generally there is no need. The cover you have is good enough and will keep a child from falling into it. Sealing the pit makes it more difficult to access the pump for inspection and maintenance.

Are there universal covers that I can retrofit to seal it ? Any recommendations.
There are universal air tight covers. They attach to the concrete floor using bolts and include a rubber seal that goes around the pit. They also include seals to go around the ejection pipe and power cord. Keep in mind if you seal your pit you will also need to vent it.

-rick
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nex

Nex

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Behind Monitor in Ontario
How much action does your pump see? If it only runs once in a blue moon it may have lots of life left. If it runs nonstop during the rainy season it may be time to replace it. Consider buying a leak detector with a detachable sensor. You can dangle the sensor in the pit and it will give you a warning before the basement floods. You can buy them at the big box stores for about $10. You would need to be home to hear the alarm going off, but its inexpensive and much better than nothing. If you want to seal the pit you will need a submersible pump. Avoid purchasing pumps that are controlled by a float attached to a wire.


You may need seal it if you have a radon problem but generally there is no need. The cover you have is good enough and will keep a child from falling into it. Sealing the pit makes it more difficult to access the pump for inspection and maintenance.


There are universal air tight covers. They attach to the concrete floor using bolts and include a rubber seal that goes around the pit. They also include seals to go around the ejection pipe and power cord. Keep in mind if you seal your pit you will also need to vent it.

-rick
Thank you

Radon is indeed issue around here, pump gets some action but I’m new to this house so I will have to establish baseline!

How would the venting look for pit with sealed cover

Great idea on leak detector!

I’m the only house in the city I think with sump but I think it’s due to the close proximity to water table
 

HereInOhio

Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
How would the venting look for pit with sealed cover

I'm on here browsing for other reasons but will be sealing my pit soon so I was reading though this. I'm wondering if an AAV would be sufficient to suck air in when the pump kicks on or if you would need air to be able to flow both ways for when the pit is filling.
 

Drick

In the Trades
Messages
458
Reaction score
17
Points
18
How would the venting look for pit with sealed cover
I never got that far with my own pit because I discovered my radon level is actually well below the level where I would need to address it. The air tight covers have a knock out for a second pipe. I assumed that is it just an open pipe between the pit and the outside. My plan was to run the vent out the side of the house since there are no sewer gasses involved.

I'm wondering if an AAV would be sufficient to suck air in when the pump kicks on or if you would need air to be able to flow both ways for when the pit is filling.
I'd avoid using an AAV on the sump it. If you have an active (or are planning on having) radon mitigation system a sump pit that is sealed and vented gives the fan on the radon system a potential location to pull in outside air.
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,000
Reaction score
3,775
Points
113
Location
IL
Get a radon detector. If level is high in the area of the pump, change things.

If you get excessive radon, use a radon fan, and exhaust outside. An AAV would not do anything for you,
 

jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,753
Reaction score
1,171
Points
113
Location
New England
If the sump pump needs to run, and the cover is tightly sealed, how do you expect to suck the water out of the pit without creating a vacuum in there without a vent? If you have radon, you do want to seal it, but a AAV might be suitable to prevent a suction, but if you have a radon mitigation system (harder to retrofit), you'd want to vent it outside.
 

HereInOhio

Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
If the sump pump needs to run, and the cover is tightly sealed, how do you expect to suck the water out of the pit without creating a vacuum in there without a vent? If you have radon, you do want to seal it, but a AAV might be suitable to prevent a suction, but if you have a radon mitigation system (harder to retrofit), you'd want to vent it outside.

The house isn't new so there's clay tiles around the base of the house and it seems to have lots of "air" under the house. To clarify I do have a radon fan but it is not piped to the sump pump, it is in the middle of the basement to pull air from all directions. I thought about drilling another hole to pull closer to the footer tiles but have not yet.

I would think even if the pump was sealed with no vent the amount of water it pumps and air that would need replaced would pull from the air in the voids under the basement. The water gets down there so it's not 100% sealed. That being said I figured an AAV would allow it to pull more air if that's necessary.

It's probably best I just run a 1 1/2" vent to the outside, It wouldn't be that hard where it's at.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks