How to reduce sounds of ABS main drain

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Maxxfusion

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I have my main drain exposed right now. Before I put drywall back up is there a preferred method to wrap the pipe or somehow deaden the sound of the pipe? The main drain pipe is right between the kitchen and family room and you can hear it every time the toilet flushes. Since the wall is open it would be nice to reduced the sounds if possible.
 

Reach4

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Try this in your Google thingie: sound deadening material pipes

I don't know which is best. Even pipe insulation will do something positive. Two layers of drywall over that wall will block sound better than one layer.
 

Maxxfusion

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I did search on google before i posted. I see a few options. Some of them people are saying didnt make a difference. So was looking for some advise from the pros.

One video i saw talked about 1 lb Mass Loaded Vinyl MLV
 

Reach4

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I did search on google before i posted. I see a few options. Some of them people are saying didnt make a difference. So was looking for some advise from the pros.
That may be to switch to cast iron pipe. ;)
 

Maxxfusion

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I read that too. I would think to do that if this would be my forever home. I just want a less intrusive solution before the drywal goes up.

Maybe i will try the MLV wrap and maybe some r13 insultaion between the studs and see how it does. Maybe add an extra layer of drywal in the kitchen as well.
 

wwhitney

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If it's a 2x6 wall, then there should be some extra depth in the wall unobstructed by the drain. In which case you could apply one or two layers of drywall to some nailers installed along the studs, so that it is recessed within the stud bay. That way you don't have to increase the thickness of the whole wall.

Of course, if it's a 3" DWV in a 2x4 wall, that won't work. Seems like in that case the drain ends up in contact with the back of the drywall, which would transmit sound better than if there were an air gap. In which case furring the wall out 1/2" before drywall should help, but I don't know.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Skoronesa

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As a drain cleaner I HATE modern no-hub cast iron with a passion, the stuff rusts really badly and doesn't last long, certainly not the 50 year design life they aim for with piping systems. It's only good quality is that it doesn't light on fire. I don't personally think it's that much quieter but we do install some no-hub for drops in some of the houses we build. And then 10 or 20 years later we change it out when it cracks lengthwise as no-hub is prone to do.

As the others guys have said you need to add mass to get it to quiet down. The lead sheet was a good idea but expensive. The important part is that whatever you do, avoid sealing it to the pipe so if need be you can work on it later. At the least leave a good portion where the pipe goes into a floor or ceiling joist/stud.
 
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