galvanized pressure tank advise

Users who are viewing this thread

logboy

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
kamloops
1st timer here. I've been searching through a lot of good info but would still appreciate some advise on my tank set-up for my seasonal cabin. My shallow well is 22' deep with a foot valve at the bottom. Because of the slope of the property, the well sits on higher ground then the tank & pump. The pump is a 1/3 HP jet pump and my tank is a 45 gal galvanized (air over water) pressure tank. I bought the tank and pump used 25 years ago and it has definitely paid for itself. Over the years, I have replaced the air volume control from the original diaphragm type to the plastic bottle type (air charger only).
**I have always had both the water in (from the pump) and the water out (to the house faucets etc) plumped in the bottom hole. Is that wrong? Should water in and water out be in separate holes in the tank? I hope that made sense.
** Because of the age of the tank and the sediment plugging the kitchen faucet aerator lately, I've been thinking of replacing the tank. I do have hard water so am I right in thinking this style of tank is better then a bladder or diaphragm tank?
** Has anyone ever had their galvanized tank re-galvanized or completely striped inside and out and painted with a food safe epoxy?
**The plastic bottle type air charger (AVC) does fill up with water near the end of the 1st pump cycle....should it?
** i do like this style of tank because draining when winterizing the cabin is fairly easy. I would be concerned of draining a bladder tank, having it frozen, and filling it up when up for NEW YEARS. Again, I hope that made sense.
**Recently, (and not in this picture) I have added another filter. A sponge type canister filter just after the little filter in the picture. I have also added an air valve to the very top tank hole....thinking I could add air if waterlogged or to help in the draining process.
Anyway, thank you in advance for any thoughts or advice.
 

Attachments

  • IMG-1034.JPG
    IMG-1034.JPG
    84.2 KB · Views: 65

Valveman

Cary Austin
Staff member
Messages
14,505
Reaction score
1,280
Points
113
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Website
cyclestopvalves.com
Diaphragm tanks are much better because you don't have to worry about all the air charge and air volume control devices. The air just stays on top of the diaphragm. A diaphragm tank is also easier to drain. But the line to the well needs to stay charged and not drain back. If the line from the well to the pump will freeze, a drain back system with the old style galvanized tank is an option.

With newer technology you don't need much of a tank. A 4.5 gallon size tank that only holds 1 gallon of water is all you need anyway. You will like the no maintenance system and the strong constant pressure from a Cycle Stop Valve.
PK1A jet pump with foot valve.jpg
 

logboy

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
kamloops
hello Cary...aka valveman and thank you for your reply. I have read many of your posts over the years and value your comments. The water line from my 22' well has never frozen . I'm pretty sure I have a foot valve and a check valve on the bottom of that line in the well. Just before were the water line enters the house, there is a curb-stop about 4' in the ground. When winterizing, I close the curb-stop and suck all the water out of that line from the curb-stop to the pump/tank...all waterline in the cabin slope to an out side hose-bib, as well as the tank. I open all the faucets in the cabin and in about an hour, tank and lines are drained.
One of my concerns about replacing my galvanized tank with a diaphragm tank is the diaphragm material damaging from freeze, then thaw then freeze as well as the hard water. Is it your believe that hard water or freezing won't effect or shorten the life of the diaphragm material?

Please keep in mind this is a seasonal cabin and not a full time home
 

Valveman

Cary Austin
Staff member
Messages
14,505
Reaction score
1,280
Points
113
Location
Lubbock, Texas
Website
cyclestopvalves.com
Won't hurt a tank to freeze unless there is water in it. No different than storing pressure tanks in an unheated warehouse, which I have done for a loooong time. Good diaphragm tanks like Amtrol or Water Worker have the water side plastic lined. There is no place where water touches the metal. The only difference would be when you open the lines a diaphragm tank will be empty in a minute instead of an hour. Oh, and you don't ever have to worry about the air charge. But if you have a bleeder orifice or air maker, you will need to get rid of it to use a diaphragm tank.
 

logboy

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
kamloops
Were are my manors? Thank you Valveman. I think I've made up my mind to replace that 42 gal galvanized tank with WX-203 Well-X-Toll. (amtrol). Probably a good idea for me to put some bleach into my well and run it through before switching out.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks