Brown water in house pipes after pump replacement and chlorination

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Brockf

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I recently replaced the pump in my well after it failed after 17 years of service.

The problem:
Water coming from house pipes in the morning after sitting all night is coming out brownish in color. After running it a short while (what I assume is the time to clear the house pipes) it runs clear.
I have put water in a glass that appeared clear and let it sit for 24 hours it stays clear so it doesn't look like iron coming out of solution.

Details of replacement :
Reduced depth of pump in well by 3 feet
shutoff water to house , only flowing water @ Pump house and pressure tank. Went through pump startup procedure 1/3 open, 2/3 open , Full ...
Sanitized well 2 cups bleach in 5 gallons water down well head ran garden house. on ground from pressure tank until Chlorine detected.
Moved garden hose to well head and let recirculate for 2 hours.
Removed hose from well head and ran on ground until PPM of Chlorine was , 1.5 ppm.
Turned water back on to house ran all faucets.
Next day ran water w/garden hose down well casing again to wash any residual chlorine off casing and wiring.

pump was replaced 4 days ago.

Is this normal ? What should I do?

Thanks!
 

Reach4

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Brockf

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It is normal to have some solids kicked up when you replace a submersible pump.

Your bleach use is a lot less than mine. I like that you measured the residual bleach level.
This is aimed at those with a pitless, but could be adapted to a well seal with a port that could be used for recirculation.
Run water to the ditch for a good while, to help be rid of sediment kicked up.
What I am seeing is clear well water and colored water from the water that sat in the house pipes overnight. It doesn't appear to be solids from the well. I'm guessing the pipes are leaching into the water to visually detectable levels when the water is stagnant in the pipes for extended times
 
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