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Thread: Pressure Tank Question

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Johnnyf0614's Avatar
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    Default Pressure Tank Question

    Newbie here... I've lived in my house for about 5 years. Never had well water before. My wife and I have always been on public, but since onwing the home, always noticed that the pressure has always been low. While taking showers we can always feel the pump and pressure kick in typically after a minute or less of showering. The higher pressure typically only lasts for less than a minute as well. From my understanding the submersible pump is fairly new though. I currently have a Wellmate WM-9. The date handwritten on the tank is June 1993. I'm assuming that's when it was installed. The T-set looks to be a bit old and coroted as well. My pressure gauge is not working. I'm looking to replace the tank with a new WM-9 and a new T-set with new pump switch, guage, etc... I'm not sure what switch I should purchase, 30/50 or 40/60, as I don't know what I currently have. Is one recommended over the other? Just a few other questions. Is it normal to really notice a difference in water pressure when showering, do dishes etc? How long should I expect the pressure tank, switch etc, to last? Any guidance would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    I suggest the EPS15/99 and a CSV from CycleStopValves. What pressure you can run will depend on the pump, the well, and your usage.

  3. #3
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    There is no reason why a home pump system can’t have even better pressure than any city water supply. You are in control of the system. You can have as much pressure as you want. With city water, the city is in control. You pay what they want you to pay, and you only get as much pressure as they want you to have.

    It maybe as simple as just turning up the pressure switch. Tighten the big adjustment nut in the pressure switch about three full turns to the right. That should increase your pressure by about 10 PSI.

    A WM9 tank holds 9 gallons of water. As you use the 9 gallons of water from the tank, the pressure will continue to decrease until the pump starts. Then the pressure will continue to increase until the 9 gallons in the tank has been replenished, and the pump shuts off. This normal cycling on and off of the pump is why you see the pressure increase for a time, then decrease for a time. This is very noticeable for people who are use to a city water supply.

    If you increase the size of the tank, you will only see longer time periods of decreasing pressure and longer time periods of increasing pressure. A CSV will give you constant pressure, after the tank has been emptied and the pump has started. For this reason a smaller tank is beneficial, as it takes less time to drain and get your system up to good strong constant pressure.

    With the size tank you have, you can narrow the bandwidth between on and off from 40/60 to 50/60 when using the EPS15/99 pressure switch as Lligetfa mentioned.
    Then a CSV would hold a constant 55 PSI for as long as you are in the shower. This would seem like so much stronger pressure that many people tell me they no longer even need soap in the shower. The strong constant pressure will just blast the dirt off.

    Most people who have a Cycle Stop Valve don’t like to visit a city. Because they have so much better pressure at home. A pressure switch at 50/60 with a CSV at 55 will make Momma happy.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member Johnnyf0614's Avatar
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    Thank you both for the information... Without knowing what my current pressure is, should I just replace the guage first, and then adjust the the pressure switch? Is it normal for a WM9 to last almost 20 years? Assuming it was installed on the dated that was handwritten on the tank? Or should I just pony up the money, replace the tank, switch, guage, and start anew?

  5. #5
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    read the stickies on how to test the tank.

  6. #6
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Since the WM-9 is a bag-in-water bladder tank, it compresses the bag so it suffers less from neglect than a water-in-bag tank which tends to stretch the bag. There's no harm in replacing the gauge even though the EPS15/99 has one built in. With the gauge you will at least know where you stand. I would pony up and get the EPS15/99 and the CSV right away. I see no reason to replace the tank. If the drawdown test comes up short and the bladder is to blame, you can replace just the bladder in those tanks.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member Johnnyf0614's Avatar
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    Thanks again,

    I ended up testing it this past weekend. After emptying the tank with water, I began to add air pressure. Unfortunately there appeared to be a few pinholes at the top of the tank. I don't know how that happened or how the tank has been holding the pressure this long, if it really had been at all. Unfortunately I was in a jam, and I had to resort to picking up a tank at a big box store. I did end up replacing the guage and added a new switch. Installed the new tank, and had absolutely no problems. The water pressure I am now getting is night and day compared to what I was getting. What a difference!! This was the first time I ever replaced a tank. I realize the lifespan I'll get out of the new tank will be minimal, but I will plan accordingly next time, and purchase a better tank when I need to replace the one I just purchased. Unfortunately I was desparate and the plumbing stores that I would have purchased a better tank at were already closed. Thanks again for everyone's help. I certainly have learned a lot!

  8. #8
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Check the pressure OFTEN and keep it a bit high with those bags tanks.

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member Johnnyf0614's Avatar
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    Often as in every 6 months? Or every month?

  10. #10
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    Often enough in the first months with a few GOOD gauges to see if there is any loss. Then go to a longer interval if it holds.

  11. #11
    DIY Junior Member Johnnyf0614's Avatar
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    Thanks again! Will do that!

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