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Thread: Well pump recovery rate?

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    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    Default Well pump recovery rate?

    My Wife and I noticed that water pressure isn't what it used to be. Weak showers and faucets are most noticeable. I have an in ground 220V pump, I don't know how deep. Possibly original, I've been here 5 years, house is 29.
    I looked at the gauge on the well line in the basement as I opened a garden hose type drain right on the pipe leading to the pressure tank and let it run into the sump. When draining, the pressure dropped until 42psi and then the pump kicked on. My main concern is while draining the water, it raised PSI very slowly. Finally I shut the valve and in about 5 seconds it hit 56 psi and stopped. It seemed to hold OK so I don't suspect a leak or check valve.
    Should the water from the pump far exceed the draining rate? The pipe to the well looks like 1" and I was draining it using a garden hose.

    Thanks,

    MIKE

  2. #2
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    If you have a bladder-type pressure tank, you should drain it of water and verify that the air pressure is correct. It might have lost air over time or have a bursted bladder. There is a post explaining more about that here- http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...nk-Maintenance

    A hose spigot can flow a lot of water relatively quickly. How fast your tank fills is relative to the rating of the pump and motor. In a perfectly sized system, when water is flowing from a large spigot such as an open hose or bathtub, the pump will run continuously without cycling on and off. Cycling the pump is hard on the motor, and it is better that it runs non-stop. IF the pressure falls below the cut in pressure of the pump, then your are using more water can it can pump. As long as the pump can maintain or increase the pressure while water is running, I wouldn't consider it a problem.

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    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info! I changed the pressure tank a few years ago when it was cycling a lot.
    42 to 56 psi is enough for a good shower upstairs. If I merely raise the on/off points, is there harm doing this?
    I still don't see why it just seems worse lately. My Wife saw me tinkering and asked if I was fixing the water pressure. She said it has been weak for a week or so. SO I know it's not just in my head.

  4. #4
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    If the pump is starting to fail, raising the pressure might speed up the process. If the gauge is old, you might want to consider spending a few dollars on a new one. If the gauge is wrong, you will be setting your air pressure in the bladder tank wrong also.

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    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    The gauge is new too. If I am checking the bladder air, I should turn off the pump, bleed all pressure out and set the tank air 2 psi under the turn on point?

  6. #6
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    Yes, drain the water first.

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    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    Ok I adjust the on to 48 psi and the off went to about 61 psi. I wanted a little higher, but I recall when I replaced it a few years ago it was listed as a 40-60 psi type.
    I drained the system and the tank tank had 35 psi of air. At the former 42 psi, it should have been 40, but that wasn't too far off, right? I put 46 psi of air into it.
    I also removed my whole house filter element. It didn't look bad and it has only been installed for 36 days.
    I took a shower and it was much better! Now I wonder where the fix was: dial up the psi, removing the filter, adding air to the tank? I am buying a filter after work and when that's in, I will know if it affects it. this is the model: http://products.geappliances.com/App...ge&Sku=GXWH35F

    Is there supposed to be a 20 psi difference between on and off? Should I replace the switch with a 50-70 psi type?

  8. #8
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    There is some leeway with the adjustment. The better ones allow you to adjust the turn on and turn off separately. 20 psi is normal setback.

    I don't know what kind of filter element you use, but my experience has been that carbon filters tend to restrict flow rates quite notably.

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    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    I put in a regular sediment filter(not carbon) and the shower is still good. An extra 5-10 psi goes a long way
    Thank you to schooling me.

    MIKE

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    Porky Cutter,MGWC Porky's Avatar
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    Now install a Cycle Stop Valve and you will have constant pressure like city water pressure. . . you're wife will love it.
    Porky Cutter, MGWC
    (Master Ground Water Consultant)

  11. #11
    DIY Junior Member mikeb33's Avatar
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    what does the valve do?

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